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This required me to detail General Weitzel from the command of his division to be chief engineer of the department, in order to get these intrenched fortifications, on which our whole safety depended, put in order so that they could be capable of being defended by a small force while we demonstrated towards Richmond. About twelve o'clock, while the movement of the 9th was going on, the enemy, advancing from Richmond upon our rear, attacked the covering force of the Tenth Corps under Colonel Voorhis of the Sixty-Seventh Ohio, and for a moment forced him back, although he gallantly held his position. General Terry, with the reserve of that corps, advanced from Port Walthall Junction. Two pieces of artillery that had been lost were re-captured by a gallant achievement of the Seventh Connecticut Volunteers, under Lieutenant-Colonel Roman, who drove the enemy back with loss to them of three hundred killed. The woods from which the enemy had been driven took fire under a high wind and
Godfrey Weitzel (search for this): chapter 16
n. Eppa Hunton, who commanded the Confederate forces in Richmond, I find that he was thoroughly puzzled to learn Gen. Godfrey Weitzel what we were up there for, and why if we intended to assault the city we did not do it with more vigor than by a my under the personal supervision and knowledge of my staff, and I thought it was my duty not to go. I sent, however, for Weitzel, but then it had got quite well along in the night. Weitzel said to me: General, I shall go if you order me to, as you Weitzel said to me: General, I shall go if you order me to, as you know, and do the very best I can, but it is exceedingly hazardous, and if it should fail after your two corps commanders, Smith and Gillmore, have so strenuously advised that it should not be undertaken, it would entirely ruin you, although to take e. One insisted on building on one line, and the other insisted on building on another. This required me to detail General Weitzel from the command of his division to be chief engineer of the department, in order to get these intrenched fortificat
George B. McClellan (search for this): chapter 16
examined particularly the topography of Virginia and North Carolina and that, too, in connection with the campaigns of McClellan around Richmond and his final retreat to Harrison's Landing. I was a good deal impressed with the peculiar topographshington in three days to meet him, without losing a man, because it is all inland navigation. In the re-transfer of McClellan's army in 1862, Halleck reports that On the first of August I ordered General Burnside to immediately embark his troopsnvince him that the transportation could be thus speedily effected, but he called my attention to the fact that it took McClellan three months to move less than thirty thousand troops from Washington to Fortress Monroe, and the whole country was ranes, or move with their artillery and supplies, at least without attracting the attention of the enemy, because when General McClellan tried to move the Army of the Potomac from Washington to Fortress Monroe, scarcely twenty-five thousand men were ab
Benj Butler (search for this): chapter 16
ies would become a unit. All the minor details of your advance are left entirely to your direction. If, however, you think it practicable to use your cavalry south of you so as to cut the railroad about Hicksford about the time of the general advance, it would be of immense advantage. You will please forward for my information, at the earliest practicable day, all orders, details, and instructions you may give for the execution of this order. U. S. Grant, Lieutenant-General. to Maj.-Gen. B. F. Butler. It was specially enjoined upon me to regulate my movements by those of the Army of the Potomac, so as to co-operate with it, and that both should move at the same moment, rain or shine. Early in the spring of 1864 the political campaign for the presidency was in progress. Indeed, the hopes of the most far-seeing rebel statesmen, and of General Lee especially, and the conduct of the military campaign by the enemy, were to a great extent regulated by the endeavor to hold on wi
outh was useless, because, while Washington was distant from New Berne only about twenty miles, and Plymouth perhaps a less distance from Washington by land, the enemy held the intervening territory, and the only communication between these places was by water by travelling a distance of from 120 to 170 miles. This opinion was reported to the War Department, but no action was taken, and I did not feel at liberty to order the evacuation of either place. November 16, an expedition under Colonel Quinn, with 450 men of the One Hundred and Forty-Eighth New York Volunteers, captured a rebel marine brigade organized to prey upon the commerce of Chesapeake Bay, and a dangerous nest of pirates was broken up. November 27, Colonel Draper, with the Sixth U. S. Colored Troops, made a successful raid into the counties lying on the sounds in Virginia and North Carolina, capturing and dispersing organized guerillas. December 4, Brigadier-General Wilde, at the head of two regiments of colored
nhabitants from the outrages of their immediate neighbors. January 25, 1864, the roads being impassable, Brigadier-General Graham, with some armed transports, went up the James River to Lower Brandon and destroyed a large quantity of provisions and forage stored there, and captured some smuggling vessels. Major-General Pickett, of the Confederate forces, made an attack upon New Berne and our lines at Beaufort, N. C., on the 1st of February, but was cleverly repulsed with loss, Brigadier-General Palmer commanding the district. By a surprise of an outpost, fifty-three of the Second North Carolina (loyal) Regiment were captured by General Pickett. By his order they were tried by court martial and twenty-two of them were hanged. Their supposed offence was that they, being enrolled in the Confederate army, had enlisted in the Union army. Upon remonstrance by General Peck, commanding in North Carolina, Pickett replied, that being deserters they were executed by his orders, and if
itude. Therefore, he spoke with directness. The President, as you know, said he, intends to be a candidate for re-election, and as his friends indicate that Mr. Hamlin should no longer be a candidate for Vice-President, and as he is from New England, the President thinks his place should be filled by someone from that section.ut that was now assured, and the question of a man for the second place on the ticket was freely and earnestly discussed. Mr. Lincoln thought and so did I that Mr. Hamlin's position during the four years of his administration made it advisable to have a new name substituted. Several men were freely talked of, but without conclusid the result to Mr. Lincoln. He seemed to regret General Butler's decision, and afterwards the name of Andrew Johnson was suggested and accepted. In my judgment Mr. Hamlin never had a serious chance to become the vice-presidential candidate after Mr. Lincoln's renomination was assured. Is Mr. Chase making any headway in his ca
Jefferson Davis (search for this): chapter 16
expeditions pusillanimity of the government regarding Reprisals Wistar's attempted surprise of Richmond and capture of Davis frustrated advantages of occupying Bermuda hundred noted: Grant and Butler plan its occupation presidential election of who would have made a very great addition to our force; and the second was to capture the Confederate Cabinet and Mr. Jefferson Davis. We had for one of our guides when the city was reached, his gardener, who had deserted to us, and if we could have laid our hands upon Davis in the early morning he would certainly have taken a ride to Fortress Monroe to greet an old friend of his who would have taken special care to keep him there, certainly as long as the telegraph wires would not work betwehe Confederacy, the decision was not gracefully acceded to. It doubtless would have been except for the obstinacy of President Davis, who insisted upon the revocation of the proclamation of emancipation as one of the terms of peace. Secretary Cha
Fitzhugh Lee (search for this): chapter 16
ened that I was proven right, for in the summer Lee did send Early to make an attack on Washington t if he failed in turning the left flank of General Lee and driving him back into Richmond, he coul of the Potomac will act from its present base, Lee's army being the objective point. You will colthe most far-seeing rebel statesmen, and of General Lee especially, and the conduct of the militaryt General Grant should strike the left flank of Lee and turn that so as to drive him into Richmond,ank and come down to co-operate with me against Lee, as he afterwards did, at City Point, Bermuda Hust below Trent's Reach, I drew and sent to Admiral Lee, in obedience to the lieutenant-general's larding of troops and supplies from the South to Lee's army. On the evening of the same day a rep not be troubled with further reinforcements to Lee from Beauregard's army. See Appendix No. 38. I was to throw my force between Beauregard and Lee, and prevent a possible junction of their force[22 more...]
A. E. Burnside (search for this): chapter 16
But, said he, bringing my troops to the James by water will uncover Washington, and Lee may attack there. To that I answered: Lee cannot march troops enough to attack Washington in eight days after he gets in motion. Keeping our transportation here ready, we can send sufficient men to Washington in three days to meet him, without losing a man, because it is all inland navigation. In the re-transfer of McClellan's army in 1862, Halleck reports that On the first of August I ordered General Burnside to immediately embark his troops at Newport News [on the James River], transfer them to Acquia Creek [near Washington], and take position opposite Fredericksburg. This officer moved with great promptness, and reached Acquia Creek on the night of the third. It also happened that I was proven right, for in the summer Lee did send Early to make an attack on Washington with his corps, it being known that quite all the veteran troops had been drawn to the Army of the Potomac, and substa
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