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Browsing named entities in a specific section of Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 10. (ed. Frank Moore). Search the whole document.

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J. T. M. Barnes (search for this): chapter 47
ommand. I detailed the required number from the different companies, selecting men with long-range guns, as far as practicable; placed them under command of Lieutenant Barnes, of Company A, and carried them forward to the left of Dobbins' skirmishers. and beyond the lagoon (which, starting from near the base of the levee, on the half-past 7, by order of General Walker, I detached Companies B and G under command of Captain Portis, of the former, and deployed them as skirmishers to support Barnes' sharpshooters, and resist a small force of Federal cavalry which was reported to be threatening our extreme left. About eight o'clock Portis reported to me thatth a list of casualties. The officers and men engaged behaved in admirable style. Captains Portis and Bryant, commanding skirmishers, did their duty well. Lieutenant Barnes, who, with his thirty sharpshooters, was almost constantly engaged, here, as everywhere else that I have ever placed him, was prompt and faithful and display
would falter or break under this flank attack, but they moved gallantly on, unheeding the murderous missiles now being hurled on them both from front and flank. Turning my attention to the front, the head of the two columns (McRae's and mine) were beyond the rifle-pits, and in an instant White's battle-flag, waving over the works, announced that Graveyard Hill was won. Thirty men of Tilden's battery having been armed and sent forward with Colonel White's regiment, under command of Lieutenant Lessneur, for the purpose of working the enemy's guns, upon their capture, this officer immediately took them in charge, but finding shot wedged in the bore, and the enemy having taken away the worms, he could not work them. He and his men resumed their muskets, and fought as infantry throughout the battle. As previously ordered, the commandants of regiments proceeded to restore order in their commands, wherever confusion had occurred. Just at this time the Lieutenant-General commanding a
D. C. Cage (search for this): chapter 47
ontested fields. I commend all these officers to the Lieutenant-General commanding, and through him to the President, for promotion, on account of gallant and meritorious conduct in the field. Acting Engineers, John Mhoon, of Alabama, and D. C. Cage, of Mississippi, not only deserve honorable mention for their gallantry upon the field, but for the skill and energy with which they overcame the difficulties that obstructed my road from Cache River to Helena. I have repeatedly recommended Mr. Mhoon for appointment in the Engineer corps, and again respectfully urge the President to recognize the worth of so excellent an officer. Mr. Cage's services demand a similar recognition. Nor should the less conspicuous, but equally useful, services of Major Isaac Brinker and Major John Reid be passed over in silence. To the practical good sense and untiring and well directed energy of the former, as Chief Quartermaster of my division, I am greatly indebted for the accomplishment of the m
J. Edwards (search for this): chapter 47
ecedented coolness and daring. To mention the name of any particular officer or soldier as having distinguished himself for gallantry above his fellows, would be to do injustice; for the brigade, as a whole, has fully sustained its well-earned reputation, and given additional evidence of the disinterested devotion of Missourians to the cause of their country-showing, as heretofore, that they are always among the first in the breach, and the last to leave it. I am indebted to my Aids, Captain Edwards and Lieutenant Chesnut for the prompt and untiring energy with which they assisted me in the engagement. Major Monroe, my brigade Quartermaster, and Major Ruthven, my brigade Commissary, deserve great praise for the activity with which they discharged the duties of their respective departments. Chief Surgeon Bear, with the regimental surgeons and their assistants, were on the field, and, by their prompt professional attention to the wounded, saved many valuable lives. A report in det
J. G. Pickett (search for this): chapter 47
d felled timber between, rendering the rapid and orderly movement of the troops very difficult. At twelve o'clock on the night of the third, the division was put in motion, my brigade in advance, which moved in the following order, viz.: first, battalion of sharpshooters, Major Pindall commanding, in front; second, the Ninth regiment, Colonel White; third, the Eighth regiment, Colonel Burns commanding; fourth, the Seventh regiment, Colonel Lewis commanding; fifth, the Tenth regiment, Colonel Pickett commanding. After moving on the main road about two miles, the column diverged to the left, along an obscure path for two miles further, and then left this path to the left, and followed up a rivulet, until arriving within about one and a half miles of Graveyard Hill. Day having not yet dawned, a halt was ordered, to await sufficient light, during which time my command was ordered to load. I had previously thrown out well to the front, as skirmishers, Major Pindall's battalion of sha
to do injustice; for the brigade, as a whole, has fully sustained its well-earned reputation, and given additional evidence of the disinterested devotion of Missourians to the cause of their country-showing, as heretofore, that they are always among the first in the breach, and the last to leave it. I am indebted to my Aids, Captain Edwards and Lieutenant Chesnut for the prompt and untiring energy with which they assisted me in the engagement. Major Monroe, my brigade Quartermaster, and Major Ruthven, my brigade Commissary, deserve great praise for the activity with which they discharged the duties of their respective departments. Chief Surgeon Bear, with the regimental surgeons and their assistants, were on the field, and, by their prompt professional attention to the wounded, saved many valuable lives. A report in detail of the killed, wounded and missing, will be forwarded at an early day to the proper department. I have the honor to be, Very respectfully, M. M. Parsons,
Marcus J. Wright (search for this): chapter 47
s Foster and Farley. Wounded: Lieutenant-Colonel Murray; Captains McRill, Bradley and Johnson; Lieutenants Pierce, McBride, Gibson, Dudley, Good, Stevens, and Weatherford. In the Seventh regiment were killed: Captains Cocke and Perry. Wounded: Lieutenant-Colonel Cummings; Adjutant Waisburg, Captain Gillett, Stemmons, and McGee; Lieutenants Austin, Anderson, Weims, Wight, Strong, Wall, Finley, West, Gonce, and Bronaugh. Colonel Lewis captured. In the Tenth regiment were wounded: Lieutenants Wright, Baker, and Hanley. The following is a summary of my losses in each regiment, battalion, and the artillery detachment: Seventh regimentKilled17  Wounded126  Missing54--197 Eighth regimentKilled14  Wounded82  Missing67--163 Ninth regimentKilled7  Wounded53--60 Tenth regimentKilled11  Wounded41  Missing237--289 Pindall's sharps'trsKilled9  Wounded26  Missing8--43 Artillery detach'tKilled1  Wounded8  Missing3--12    Total loss764 recapitulation. Killed
&c., camp at Searcy, Arkansas, July 21, 1863. Major W. B. Blair, A. A. A. General, Headquarters District of Arkansas, &c.: Major: I have the honor to report as follows in regard to the part taken by my brigade in the attack on Helena, upon the fourth instant: On the evening of the third instant, at dark, I ordered Colonel Brooks, with his regiment, one section of Etter's battery of light artillery, commanded by Lieutenant John C. Arnett, and three companies of cavalry, commanded by Captain Densen, to move to the front in support of the cavalry, then within three miles of the town of Helena. About eleven o'clock at night, with the three remaining regiments, commanded respectively by Colonels King, Hawthorne and Bell, and Blocker's battery of light artillery, commanded by Captain W. D. Blocker, I moved forward on the road towards Helena. On joining Colonel Brooks, where the old hill road leaves the Little Rock road, I ordered him to advance at once with his command, on the latter
W. S. Walker (search for this): chapter 47
h June (Friday), whence, by converging roads, the two columns would move in the direction of Helena. I also informed General Walker, commanding brigade of cavalry in the vicinity of Helena, of my intention, and directed him to allow no ingress to thgades, will proceed by the best route, assume position, assault and take Graveyard Hill, at daylight. Second--Brigadier-General Walker, with his cavalry brigade, will, in like manner, proceed to the Stirling road, where he will hold himself in posed on his left flank and rear, and held him perfectly in check during the whole day. It was the peculiar duty of Brigadier-General Walker to have prevented this movement on the part of the enemy, and, as represented by General Marmaduke, the same could have been easily accomplished. No satisfactory reason has been given by General Walker why this service was not rendered. This attack, being most remote, was not under my personal supervision, and was too distant for me to give specific orders.
t, that he was being pressed, and needed two more companies. I immediately communicated the information to General Walker, and, by his direction, instructed Portis to observe the enemy closely, skirmish with him and, if too heavily pressed, fall back slowly, advising me from time to time of what was transpiring. About this time I received an order to send forward another company to support Dobbins' skirmishers, which I obeyed by sending Captain Rolland's Company E, under command of Lieutenant Garner. Learning that the enemy had made several attempts to force Portis back, and gain possession of the west bank of Porter's lake, which would enable him, by means of his sharpshooters, to annoy the rear at our battery posted on the hill in front of the blockade, and, perhaps, finally force us from the hill altogether, I went in person to where Portis was to learn the true condition of affairs, and ascertain what, if anything, could be done. I found that Portis, with his small force,
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