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Browsing named entities in a specific section of Edward Porter Alexander, Military memoirs of a Confederate: a critical narrative. Search the whole document.

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irst made by Col. E. C. Edmonds of the 38th Va. . . . I found that the enemy were in, near, and around Crew's house, and that the hill in front of the ravine we occupied was a good position for artillery. It was asked for, and Capt. Pegram's and Grimes's batteries were sent. The fire was a terrible one and the men stood it well. The enemy must have had 30 or 40 pieces opposed to ours and of superior calibre. No men could have behaved better than Capts. Pegram and Grimes. They worked their gGrimes. They worked their guns after their men were cut down, and only retired when entirely disabled. I sent for more artillery repeatedly. These extracts sufficiently illustrate the character of the fighting during the hours devoted in theory to bringing a heavy enfilading and cross-fire of artillery to bear upon the enemy in his crowded position. The one advantage which we had was that all our shots were converging toward his centre, and stood fair chances of finding some of his troops, even when they missed thei
Stonewall Jackson (search for this): chapter 9
Hill writes in the Century magazine: — Jackson moved over White Oak Swamp on July 1, Whitingbut by staff-officers under cavalry escorts. Jackson, on the left flank, had with him a fair suppl enemy observed and held by Longstreet, while Jackson got a position which they would be forced to zed. He forwarded the report to Lee, through Jackson, and early on the 3d, with a few cavalry and ned fire, he thought that both Longstreet and Jackson were near. In fact, neither was within milesnd on the 3d was sent by roads to the left of Jackson. By mistake of the guides he was conducted tlast to retire. . . . The next day, July 4, Gen. Jackson's command drove in the enemy's advanced picll's division and two brigades of Magruder's. Jackson was also up with his own, Ewell's, Whiting's,Jackson's troops, however, were in front, and Jackson protested against the attack, saying that the yielded to Jackson's persuasion. Evidently, Jackson was still not the Jackson of the Valley. T[4 more...]
G. T. Beauregard (search for this): chapter 9
rally appreciated. Fortunately for us, Lincoln and Halleck recalled McClellan and his army to Washington without ever realizing them; although McClellan had tried hard to impress them upon his superiors. Fortunately, too, for us, Gen. S. G. French, in command at Petersburg, saw and appreciated the threat of the position, and immediately began the construction of a line of intrenchments about that city. These intrenchments, in 1864, defeated some attempts at surprise; and at last enabled Beauregard, with two divisions, to withstand the attack of Grant's whole army, between June 15 and 18 of that year. My personal duties during the Seven Days were the supervision and distribution of our ammunition supplies. Our organized division supply trains and brigade wagons worked smoothly, and no scarcity was felt anywhere. In addition to these duties, I was placed in charge of a balloon which had been manufactured in Savannah by Dr. Edward Cheves, and sent to Gen. Lee for use in reconnoi
Longstreet (search for this): chapter 9
him whipped. Reconnoissance, ordered by Longstreet on the right, found a position favorable if eld on the River road, and was not engaged. Longstreet and Hill were in reserve behind Magruder; anock Lee abandoned his intention to assault. Longstreet was informed, His report says, — A littleeased. Shortly before this, Lee had taken Longstreet and ridden over to our left in search of som A short reconnoissance induced Lee to order Longstreet at once to move his own division and Hill's nly been severely engaged at Gaines Mill. Longstreet, with A. P. Hill's and his own divisions, wahow important it was to hold the ground till Longstreet arrived. The enemy's infantry advanced, a kept up its fire. I just then learned that Longstreet had taken the wrong road and was then at Nan with Franklin's division. The next morning Longstreet was up with his own and A. P. Hill's divisio did not reach the field until noon, and, as Longstreet ranked Jackson, he ordered the enemy's picke[10 more...]
U. S. Grant (search for this): chapter 9
ck recalled McClellan and his army to Washington without ever realizing them; although McClellan had tried hard to impress them upon his superiors. Fortunately, too, for us, Gen. S. G. French, in command at Petersburg, saw and appreciated the threat of the position, and immediately began the construction of a line of intrenchments about that city. These intrenchments, in 1864, defeated some attempts at surprise; and at last enabled Beauregard, with two divisions, to withstand the attack of Grant's whole army, between June 15 and 18 of that year. My personal duties during the Seven Days were the supervision and distribution of our ammunition supplies. Our organized division supply trains and brigade wagons worked smoothly, and no scarcity was felt anywhere. In addition to these duties, I was placed in charge of a balloon which had been manufactured in Savannah by Dr. Edward Cheves, and sent to Gen. Lee for use in reconnoitring the enemy's lines. It was made from silk of many
n to advance. This, as near as I could judge, was about an hour and a half before sundown. . . . The division fought heroically and well, but fought in vain. Garland, in my immediate front, showed all his wonted courage and enthusiasm, but he needed and asked for reenforcements. I sent Lt.-Col. Newton, 6th Ga., to his support, and, observing a brigade by a fence in our rear, I galloped back to it and found it to be that of Gen. Toombs. I ordered it forward to support Garland, and accompanied it. The brigade advanced handsomely to the brow of the hill, but soon retreated in disorder. Gordon, commanding Rodes's brigade, pushed gallantly forward and gais's, Colquitt's, and Ripley's brigades of D. H. Hill's division, the casualties were making 889, a total, so far, of 5111. The other two brigades, Anderson's and Garland's, report only their total casualties for the campaign as 863 and 844, a total of 1707. A half, 854, is a moderate estimate for their losses at Malvern. This w
whole reserve artillery stood idle all day. Pendleton graduated at West Point in 1830, one year after Lee. He resigned in 1833, and entered the ministry in 1837. In 1861, he returned to military life, and was appointed Chief of Artillery of the Army about Oct., 1861, under Gen. Johnston. His command did little during the Seven Days, and Col. Brown, commanding his largest battalion, in his report mentions the great superabundance of artillery and the scanty use that was made of it. Col. Cutts, commanding another battalion, also reported:— My own small command (seven guns) was assigned a place near the battle-field of Tuesday, the 1st inst., and although I am sure that more artillery could have been used with advantage in this engagement, and also that my company could have done good service, yet I received no orders; therefore, I have not had the honor to participate in any of the many engagements for the protection of our capital. Several field-batteries were brought i
J. R. Anderson (search for this): chapter 9
, pushed gallantly forward and gained considerable ground, but was forced back. The gallant and accomplished Meares, 3d N. C., Ripley's brigade, had fallen at the head of his regiment, and that brigade was streaming to the rear. Colquitt's and Anderson's brigades had also fallen back. Ransom's brigade had come up to my support from Gen. Huger. It moved too far to the left and became mixed up with a mass of troops near the parsonage on the Quaker road, suffering much and effecting little. Geer's division the casualties were 2014, and in Huger's, including Ransom's brigade, 1609. In Rodes's, Colquitt's, and Ripley's brigades of D. H. Hill's division, the casualties were making 889, a total, so far, of 5111. The other two brigades, Anderson's and Garland's, report only their total casualties for the campaign as 863 and 844, a total of 1707. A half, 854, is a moderate estimate for their losses at Malvern. This would make our total losses 5965 or more; those of the enemy could sca
A. P. Hill (search for this): chapter 9
rely exhausted its ammunition and been sent to the rear to replenish. In the demand for guns, A. P. Hill sent two of his batteries, Davidson's and Pegram's. Pegram had been engaged in every battle, been in position for a counterstroke, the fragments could have made but little opposition. But A. P. Hill and Longstreet were close in rear, and Whiting's, Jackson's, and Ewell's divisions were on the's and Whiting's divisions, had only been severely engaged at Gaines Mill. Longstreet, with A. P. Hill's and his own divisions, was on the 2d moved around the field of battle to Poindexter's house,rnoon of July 3 with Franklin's division. The next morning Longstreet was up with his own and A. P. Hill's division and two brigades of Magruder's. Jackson was also up with his own, Ewell's, Whiting''s corps Margruder's Div.2848749967 Longstreet's Div.6188325554438 Huger's Div.311373941531 A. P. Hill's Div.6764268875084210 Holmes's Div.3499178677 Pendleton's Art.22 Stuart's Cav.7171 Totals
's brigades had also fallen back. Ransom's brigade had come up to my support from Gen. Huger. It moved too far to the left and became mixed up with a mass of troops near the parsonage on the Quaker road, suffering much and effecting little. Gen. Winder was sent up by Gen. Jackson, but he came too late, and also went to the same belt of woods near the parsonage, already overcrowded with troops. Finally Gen. Ewell came up, but it was after dark, and nothing could be accomplished. I advised ht direct roads, and his troops having been least engaged during the Seven Days. Two of the four brigades of his own division had been so little exposed as to have had together but two killed and 26 wounded, in the whole campaign. His 3d brigade, Winder's, had had but 75 casualties at Gaines Mill, and 104 at Malvern. Lawton's brigade, and Ewell's and Whiting's divisions, had only been severely engaged at Gaines Mill. Longstreet, with A. P. Hill's and his own divisions, was on the 2d moved ar
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