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, etc., etc.: General,—I am instructed to communicate to you the following orders of the Commanding General: 1st. That the treble-banded Brooke gun which burst on Sullivan's Island be brought to the city as soon as practicable. 2d. That, if not already done, the other Brooke gun which arrived from Richmond be forthwith sent to Sullivan's Island. This was ordered several days ago. 3d. That you will please inform these Headquarters whether the order in reference to the picket at Monk's Corner has yet been complied with, and any deserters arrested. 4th. That you turn over, temporarily, to Lieutenant Rochelle, C. S. N., for army transportation and guard purposes in the harbor, all row-boats, barges, etc., not required for your current wants, taking proper receipts. 5th. That, as soon as possible, you have removed from Fort Sumter all the lead, copper, good carriages, and chassis, etc., especially the carriage and chassis of the 11-inch gun now required in the city.
Braxton Bragg (search for this): chapter 8
e Almighty would seem to have protected the heroic garrison of that historic work. Respectfully, your obedient servant, G. T. Beauregard, Genl. Comdg. Headquarters, Department S. C., Ga., and Fla., Charleston, S. C., Oct. 7th, 1863. General Braxton Bragg, Commanding near Chattanooga, Tenn.: Dear General,—I have just been informed from Richmond that the Army of Virginia is about to take the offensive again, to prevent Meade from reinforcing Rosecrans, thus repeating, to a certain extentstance of General Taliaferro. The incident now about to be related is deserving of note. It produced a feeling of disappointment among some of the warmest friends of Mr. Davis. About the middle of October, 1863, President Davis visited General Bragg at his headquarters near Dalton, to settle a difficulty then existing between that officer and his subordinate commanders, and to suggest Longstreet's assault on Knoxville. While returning to Richmond he stopped a day or two in Savannah and
John Johnson (search for this): chapter 8
. H. Harleston, 1st S. C. Artillery; and Lieutenant Johnson, Corps of Engineers, met at Fort Sumter sent offensive condition of the fort. Lieutenant Johnson, Engineer Corps: The present offensive c Captain Harleston: Of same opinion as Lieutenant Johnson. Major Blanding: The offensive condity advantage. Colonel Harris: Endorses Lieutenant Johnson's opinion. Colonel Rhett: In action w Colonel Gilmer: Of the same opinion as Lieutenant Johnson. Second proposition. Can offensivlish the work in the manner suggested by Lieutenant Johnson, if not under fire, at night, when the fattack, and the number of men needed. Lieutenant Johnson: I think the capacity of the fort suffice condition against probable attacks. Lieutenant Johnson: Against the probable combined attacks ohours. Captain Harleston: Agrees with Lieutenant Johnson. Major Blanding: Against a combined vy. F. H. Harleston, Capt., 1st S. C. Art'y. John Johnson, 1st Lieut., Engr. Corps, P. A. C. S. [3 more...]
Ormsby Blandino (search for this): chapter 8
ng reinforced with eight feet of sand. The roof of the hospital is now only protected by brick arches that would be crushed through by a few shells. Colonel Gilmer: From the examination I have been able to make, as to the effect of the bombardment up to this time, I think the fort will remain tenable against any probable attack for many days, if the Engineer officer be supplied with the labor and material necessary to reinforce points comparatively weak. Alfred Rhett, Col. Comdg. Ormsby Blandino, Major, 1st S. C. Art'y. F. H. Harleston, Capt., 1st S. C. Art'y. John Johnson, 1st Lieut., Engr. Corps, P. A. C. S. The foregoing is a correct report of what occurred at the consultation of the officers named; but we do not consider it as embodying our opinion in full as to the advisability of abandoning the work, as called for by the Commanding General, in a letter a copy of which is embraced in the foregoing proceedings. J. F. Gilmer, Col. and Chief-Engr. of Bureau, D. B. Harr
G. T. Beauregard (search for this): chapter 8
rded to Colonel Harris: Colonel,—General Beauregard directs that you proceed immediately to timation in which he held Colonel Rhett, General Beauregard, shortly after this occurrence, stronglyant, Thomas Jordan, Chief of Staff. General Beauregard had taken more than ordinary pains in thweeks. It had been obtained as follows: General Beauregard, in his anxiety to understand the enemy'unable to do; then, at the suggestion of General Beauregard, another expedient was resorted to—namelthe beginning of the war. He reported to General Beauregard, at Manassas, and was, shortly afterwardprobable assault on the ruins of Sumter, General Beauregard had ordered the nearest harbor batteries, very respectfully, your obdt. servt., G. T. Beauregard, Genl. Comdg. Headquarters, Departmentof South Carolina, Georgia, and Florida, General Beauregard sent several members of his staff—among When the President left Charleston, General Beauregard escorted him once more, and was among th[25 more...
Joseph E. Johnston (search for this): chapter 8
f last July into Pennsylvania, which did not save Middle Tennessee and the Mississippi Valley. You must, no doubt, recollect what I wrote on the subject to General Johnston, on the 15th of May See Chapter XXXI. last, to endeavor to prevent that offensive campaign, which, I thought, would not effect the object in view. I no,000. War being a contest of masses against fractions, all other things being equal, you would certainly be defeated; then, either you must be reinforced from Johnston's or Lee's army, or Middle Georgia would be lost, and the Confederacy, now cut in two, would then be cut in three. Meanwhile, Meade, having been reinforced by tnce could be listened to, I would say again, act entirely on the defensive in Virginia, send you immediately 25,000 men from Lee's army, 5000 or 10,000 more from Johnston's forces, to enable you to take the offensive forthwith, and cross the Tennessee to crush Rosecrans before he can be reinforced to any large extent from any quar
iumph. I regret I have not time to pay you a short visit, to present you my views more fully, and to discuss with you our future operations. Wishing you ample success, I remain, sincerely your friend, G. T. Beauregard. Headquarters, Department S. C., Ga., and Fla., Charleston, S. C., Oct. 8th, 1863. Brig.-General R. S. Ripley, Comdg. First Mil. Dist., etc., etc.: General,—It is the wish of the Commanding General that you should at once have inquiries made where the fault lies in Evans's brigade not being properly supplied with ammunition. With the exception of the 22d South Carolina Volunteers, now on Sullivan's Island, none of the regiments are completely supplied with the regulation number of forty rounds. The 23d Regiment, stationed some seven miles from Brigade Headquarters, is extremely deficient, and has no immediate means of replacing any necessary consumption, as all ordnance wagons and ordnance sergeants are attached to Brigade Headquarters, and not with th
ery respectfully, your obedient servant, Jno. F. O'Brien, Major, and A. A. G. Headquarters, Department S. C., Ga., and Fla., Charleston, S. C., Sept. 15th, 1863. Brig.-General R. S. Ripley, Comdg. First Mil. Dist., etc., etc.: General,—I am instructed to communicate to you the following orders of the Commanding General: 1st. That the treble-banded Brooke gun which burst on Sullivan's Island be brought to the city as soon as practicable. 2d. That, if not already done, the other Brooke gun which arrived from Richmond be forthwith sent to Sullivan's Island. This was ordered several days ago. 3d. That you will please inform these Headquarters whether the order in reference to the picket at Monk's Corner has yet been complied with, and any deserters arrested. 4th. That you turn over, temporarily, to Lieutenant Rochelle, C. S. N., for army transportation and guard purposes in the harbor, all row-boats, barges, etc., not required for your current wants, taking proper r
A. S. Williams (search for this): chapter 8
able. This order was also sent to Brigadier-General Hagood. Respectfully, your obedient servant, Thomas Jordan, Chief of Staff. Headquarters, Department S. C., Ga., and Fla., Charleston, S. C., Nov. 1st, 1863. His Excellency M. L. Bonham, Governor of South Carolina, etc., etc.: Governor,—Your letter of the 24th inst. enclosing one from Colonel Waddy Thompson, and another from Messrs. Pullian and Patten, has been received. I have ordered a light battery to report at once to Colonel Williams, at Greenville, S. C. I regret as much as you do my inability to send mounted troops for the defence of that part of the State. It is not prudent to withdraw, at this critical moment, from my already too small forces a regiment of old troops from the defence of Charleston. So soon as it can be done with safety I will gladly send all the assistance in my power to Governor Vance. I remain, very respectfully, your obdt. servt., G. T. Beauregard, Genl. Comdg. Headquarters, Depart
J. S. Bee (search for this): chapter 8
at Cummings's Point, the Commanding General hopes we may be able to foil and convert it into a signal disaster, to which end he wishes you to acquaint Flag-officer Tucker of the project, and request him to take such a position with his ships as may enable him to sweep with his fire the interior face of Morris Island and the mouth of Vincent's Creek. Battery Simpkins will fire likewise so as to sweep in front of the mouth of the same creek, and, later, to the left of Cummings's Point. Battery Bee will be specially enjoined to direct her fire between Fort Sumter and Cummings's Point, so as to assist the gunboats in sweeping the interior water face of Morris Island. Some of the guns of Fort Moultrie must also be brought to bear on the same face of the island, the rest of her armament giving attention to the monitors, but being employed in strict conformity with the views of the Commanding General, hitherto expressed, on the subject of the fire of the Sullivan's Island batteries at the
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