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ne. If two methods were presented, one direct and the other indirect, he always chose the direct; if two courses opened, the one doubtful and leading to safety, the other dangerous and heroic, he was sure to choose the heroic at whatever cost. Joseph E. Johnston when a subordinate was once under Sumner's command. Johnston, with other officers, was required to attend reveille every morning. On one occasion he had some slight indisposition which the early rising aggravated, so he asked Surgeon Cuyler to excuse him from that exercise. Sumner interposed at once: Ie must then go wholly on the sick report. Once again, at a frontier garrison which Sumner commanded, he himself had a severe attack of indigestion, caused from drinking some alkaline water that he could not avoid. He was much weakened, and the officers, sure of what students would call an absence at the next reveille, congratulated each other upon the anticipated rest to be had without discovery and punishment. But lo I S
Abraham Lincoln (search for this): chapter 2.14
the time great excitement on the subject. Mr. Lincoln had left his home in Illinois on February 1ed from Washington and promptly conveyed to Mr. Lincoln the startling information from Senator Sewantiated, was at the time hardly credited by Mr. Lincoln himself, yet there appeared to most of his V. Sumner and Major David Hunter were among Mr. Lincoln's many reliable friends — a sort of volunta of Colonel Sumner's early intimacy with President Lincoln, he was colonel of the First regular cavis was to enable the loyal to rise, a thing Mr. Lincoln greatly desired, and to break up all rail cce, but it originated in the great heart of Mr. Lincoln, who hoped almost against hope to win the sbtless excited himself by so many delays, Abraham Lincoln ordered on March 8th: That the Army and Name or equal intrenchments at either place. Mr. Lincoln instinctively felt that the true objective ssas. In spite of McClellan's objection, Mr. Lincoln had caused him to organize his Potomac forc
Joseph E. Johnston (search for this): chapter 2.14
to choose the heroic at whatever cost. Joseph E. Johnston when a subordinate was once under Sumner's command. Johnston, with other officers, was required to attend reveille every morning. On one o guess just what our army would attempt. But Johnston, our enemy at Centreville, Va., was shrewder lellan and so no time was to be lost, because Johnston knew that our preparations in the way of transports were already far advanced. Johnston commenced his rearward movement the day before the publind the bridge building, which did not deceive Johnston nor arrest his preparations for leaving Centre objective all the time was not Richmond but Johnston's army. After we had finished the bridge b to grove, as we pressed on. That cavalry was Johnston's rear guard, when his army was in motion soume his outpost and picketing force as soon as Johnston halted. Sumner stopped his general movement awakened dreamer and pushed out in pursuit of Johnston with more than twenty-five miles the start, c
ey said everywhere where the echo of their voices could reach: Come on, we defy you! We are in earnest. We mean war! We have struck for independence! Their leaders were too ardent, too determined, too well prepared in plan and purpose to accept any sort of compromise. They had no patience whatever with the Unionists and half Unionists among themselves. And, indeed, we ought from every military conception to have accepted this gage of combat as much as possible, as did Grant, Sherman, Thomas, and Sheridan at later dates. But we must remember that in January, 1862, the country had not yet so decided, and our Eastern forces were far behind the Western in the wish to free the slaves. It is for this reason that so many veteran soldiers, and among them those who were even then loyal to humanity, maintained that McClellan was doing his simple duty and could not be censured for the politico-military course which he at that time was obliged to pursue. In order to prevent the ever-p
E. Kirby Smith (search for this): chapter 2.14
come over to his quarters. I hastened to the interview, which resulted in my taking three regiments the next day to protect the bridge builders at Accotink Run, six miles ahead, on the Orange & Alexandria Railroad. I went as far as Fairfax Station, driving the Confederate pickets before me. That movement on March 4th and the bridge building, which did not deceive Johnston nor arrest his preparations for leaving Centreville, but rather quickened them, set the ball in motion. A brigade, E. Kirby Smith's, stationed at Fairfax and vicinity, retired as I advanced and soon after joined the main Confederate army at Manassas Junction. The news, a few days later, came: Centreville is evacuated. It startled and disappointed everybody at Washington. The peninsular plan now quickly came to the front. Quartermasters, commissaries, naval officers, commanders of steamers and army sutlers were stimulated and warmed into busy life. Everybody, great and small, had some mysterious and unusual t
George W. Balloch (search for this): chapter 2.14
the war, and Miller, who fell in our first great battle. My brother, Lieutenant C. H. Howard, and Lieutenant Nelson A. Miles were then my aids. Sumner, noticing his conduct in action, used to say of Miles: That officer will get promoted or get killed. F. D. Sewall, for many months my industrious adjutant general, took the colonelcy of the Nineteenth Maine, and my able judge advocate, E. Whittlesey, at last accepted the colonelcy of another regiment. The acting brigade commissary, George W. Balloch, then a lieutenant in the Fifth New Hampshire, adhered to his staff department and was a colonel and chief commissary of a corps before the conflict ended. To comprehend McClellan's responsibility and action after he came to Washington, we must call to mind the fact that he did not simply command the Army of the Potomac, which he had succeeded in organizing out of the chaos and confusion of the Bull Run panic, but till March 11, 1862, he had his eye upon the whole field of operation
rmit, religiously respect the constitutional rights of all. ... Be careful so to treat the unarmed inhabitants as to contract, not widen, the breach existing between us and the rebels. It should be our constant aim to make it apparent to all that their property, their comfort, and their personal safety will be best preserved by adhering to the cause of the Union. Remember that that word property in McClellan's mind was meant to include the slaves. Similar instructions went from him to Halleck~ in Missouri, who was further ordered to mass his troops on or near the Mississippi, prepared for such ulterior operations as the public interests might demand. General T. W. Sherman with a detachment was at the same time dispatched against Savannah and the coast below. The original plan was: to gain Fort Sumter and hold Charleston. But for a time that plan was postponed. After New Orleans and its approaches had been secured by Butler, McClellan contemplated a combined army and navy
F. D. Sewall (search for this): chapter 2.14
army; Barlow, of the Sixty-first New York, who, by wounds received in several engagements went again and again to death's door but lived through a most distinguished career of work and promotion to exercise eminent civil functions after the war, and Miller, who fell in our first great battle. My brother, Lieutenant C. H. Howard, and Lieutenant Nelson A. Miles were then my aids. Sumner, noticing his conduct in action, used to say of Miles: That officer will get promoted or get killed. F. D. Sewall, for many months my industrious adjutant general, took the colonelcy of the Nineteenth Maine, and my able judge advocate, E. Whittlesey, at last accepted the colonelcy of another regiment. The acting brigade commissary, George W. Balloch, then a lieutenant in the Fifth New Hampshire, adhered to his staff department and was a colonel and chief commissary of a corps before the conflict ended. To comprehend McClellan's responsibility and action after he came to Washington, we must call t
Charles Henry Howard (search for this): chapter 2.14
everal engagements went again and again to death's door but lived through a most distinguished career of work and promotion to exercise eminent civil functions after the war, and Miller, who fell in our first great battle. My brother, Lieutenant C. H. Howard, and Lieutenant Nelson A. Miles were then my aids. Sumner, noticing his conduct in action, used to say of Miles: That officer will get promoted or get killed. F. D. Sewall, for many months my industrious adjutant general, took the coloock Bridge, I went into camp with great care, facing different ways upon the top of a thickly wooded height. I was told that the venturesome Stuart during the night came over the river and made a personal examination, and that he afterwards said Howard had taken such a position and so posted his troops that he decided not to attack him. On my return Sumner met me with the gladness of a father. As the Maryland political campaign had gained me General Casey's confidence, so this reconnoissance
E. V. Sumner (search for this): chapter 2.14
t reconnoissance The first time that General E. V. Sumner's name made any considerable impressionith evident reluctance. At that time Colonel E. V. Sumner and Major David Hunter were among Mr. Ls incident indicates the indomitable spirit of Sumner, always exhibited from the time of his entry i E. Johnston when a subordinate was once under Sumner's command. Johnston, with other officers, wasgeon Cuyler to excuse him from that exercise. Sumner interposed at once: Ie must then go wholly on ort. Once again, at a frontier garrison which Sumner commanded, he himself had a severe attack of first man on the ground! At the time of Colonel Sumner's early intimacy with President Lincoln, h General Twiggs's defection and dismissal gave Sumner a brigadiership. His California work was madehe Gulf States. Such was. the war-worn, loyal Sumner who arrived in Washington the last of November expecting just then some active campaigning. Sumner was to choose his division from the provisiona[5 more...]
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