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August 19th (search for this): chapter 6
re Parker was there, and introduced to me. I had some pleasant talk with him, but before I could get to Spinoza, somebody seized on me and carried me off to quite another S,--to supper. On the whole, it all pleased my eye; my fashionable fellow-creatures were very civil to me, and I went home, glad to have looked at this slide in the magic lantern also. Ms. Writing from Providence, August 14, 1837, she lays plans for her summer vacation, which is to begin with unmerciful tardiness on August 19. For her three weeks vacation she plans to visit, with her friend Caroline Sturgis, that delicious land of lotus-eating, Artichoke Mills, on the Merrimack, there to be silent and enjoy daily wood-walks or boat excursions with her, --or else to go to Concord. As to Providence, she writes:-- I fear I have not much to tell that will amuse you. With books and pens I have, maugre my best efforts, been able to do miserably little. If I cannot be differently situated, I must leave Provide
o, and that I have had more than average difficulties to encounter, some of them insurmountable. But from these difficulties I have learned so much that I cannot but suppose my experience is to be of further use. I do not wish to teach again at all. If I consult my own wishes I shall employ the remainder of my life in quite a different manner. But 1 foresee circumstances that may make it wrong for me to obey my wishes. Mother has sold her place at Groton, and as she is to leave it in April, I shall go home and stay three months at least. I dream of Elysian peace, of quiet growth, and other benefits no doubt well-known to your imagination. Then I hope to prevail on her to board with Ellen and me, and send the boys to school for some months. But after that we must find a sure foothold on the earth somewhere and plan anew a home. But this leaves me nearly a year for my own inventions. If at the end of that time it should seem necessary for the good of all concerned that 1
April, 1837 AD (search for this): chapter 6
oting from their snug tenements, overgrown rather with nettles than with ivy, at this star of purest ray serene. But you are not here, more's the pity, and perhaps do not know exactly what you are doing; do write to me and reassure me. Ms. But whether the newspapers were right or wrong, their criticisms killed the school. Mr. Alcott's receipts, which during the previous year had been $1,395, sank to $549 during the year after the attack; the forty pupils dwindled to ten, and in April, 1837, the school furniture and apparatus were sold, and the assistant necessarily discharged. The school itself lingered for two years more, until fresh wrath was kindled by the admission of a colored child; there was another withdrawal of pupils, leaving Mr. Alcott with nobody to teach but his own three daughters, the colored child, and one undismayed white pupil. I earn little or nothing in this miserable school, he writes in his unpublished diary, April 23, 1839, nor am I laboring towards
December 17th (search for this): chapter 6
the school of Mr. A. B. Alcott, in Boston, where Miss Elizabeth P. Peabody had been previously employed. Mr. Alcott's unpublished diary gives the successive steps in the negotiation and enables me to present the beginning and the end together. 1836, August 2d. Emerson called this morning and took me to Concord to pass the day. At his house I met Margaret Fuller (I had seen her once before this), and had some conversation with her about taking Miss Peabody's place in my school. December 17th. I have seen M. F., who, besides giving instruction in the languages, will report The conversations on the Gospels as they proceed. 1837, January 8th. I resume the Conversations, which have been suspended since last July. Subject, The sermon on the Mount, for a beginning. Miss F. reports them; if she succeeds in seizing their form and spirit, we may add a third to the two published volumes. 1837, 12th January. This evening with M. F. Clearly a person given to the boldest spec
March 17th (search for this): chapter 6
ldest speculations, and of liberal and varied acquirements. Not wanting in imaginary power, she strikes me as having the rarest good sense and discretion:--qualities so essential to success in any sphere, and especially to a woman ambitious of literary distinction, and relying solely on native work. She adopts the spiritual philosophy, and has the subtlest perceptions of its necessities and bearings. February 8th. Miss F. succeeds, after some trial, in reporting the Conversations. March 17th. An agreeable hour with M. F., in whose sympathy and insight I find great content. She takes large and generous views of things, and her dispositions are singularly catholic and liberal. She has great skill in discourse, too: few converse with the like freedom and elegance. I am pleased to learn of the interest taken in her behalf by persons here in our city whose favor is a passport to success. To her has been given with the gift of intellect that of prudence, and when these are unit
January 12th (search for this): chapter 6
rsation with her about taking Miss Peabody's place in my school. December 17th. I have seen M. F., who, besides giving instruction in the languages, will report The conversations on the Gospels as they proceed. 1837, January 8th. I resume the Conversations, which have been suspended since last July. Subject, The sermon on the Mount, for a beginning. Miss F. reports them; if she succeeds in seizing their form and spirit, we may add a third to the two published volumes. 1837, 12th January. This evening with M. F. Clearly a person given to the boldest speculations, and of liberal and varied acquirements. Not wanting in imaginary power, she strikes me as having the rarest good sense and discretion:--qualities so essential to success in any sphere, and especially to a woman ambitious of literary distinction, and relying solely on native work. She adopts the spiritual philosophy, and has the subtlest perceptions of its necessities and bearings. February 8th. Miss F. suc
January 8th (search for this): chapter 6
e steps in the negotiation and enables me to present the beginning and the end together. 1836, August 2d. Emerson called this morning and took me to Concord to pass the day. At his house I met Margaret Fuller (I had seen her once before this), and had some conversation with her about taking Miss Peabody's place in my school. December 17th. I have seen M. F., who, besides giving instruction in the languages, will report The conversations on the Gospels as they proceed. 1837, January 8th. I resume the Conversations, which have been suspended since last July. Subject, The sermon on the Mount, for a beginning. Miss F. reports them; if she succeeds in seizing their form and spirit, we may add a third to the two published volumes. 1837, 12th January. This evening with M. F. Clearly a person given to the boldest speculations, and of liberal and varied acquirements. Not wanting in imaginary power, she strikes me as having the rarest good sense and discretion:--qualities
June 10th, 1837 AD (search for this): chapter 6
the contrary. Mr. Fuller taught the school for a few years only, then went to New York and became connected with the New York Mirror, edited by N. P. Willis and George P. Morris. This he abandoned after a time, being tired, as he said, of supporting two poets, and was afterwards editor of the London Cosmopolitan. In addition to his bold choice of an assistant, he invoked the rising prestige of Ralph Waldo Emerson, inviting him to give an address at the dedication of the Academy (Saturday, June 10, 1837), and suggesting to him, he being still in the ministry, to bring sermons and preach in the two Unitarian churches. Margaret Fuller was ill for a time after reaching Providence, and wrote to Mr. Emerson in June, 1837: Concord, dear Concord, haven of repose, where headache, vertigo, other sins that flesh is heir to, cannot long continue. After this came a period of unusual health, during which she wrote in great exhilaration to her friends. To Miss Peabody, for instance (July 8
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