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Browsing named entities in a specific section of John Dimitry , A. M., Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 10.1, Louisiana (ed. Clement Anselm Evans). Search the whole document.

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Hood willingly undertook the enterprise, but unfortunately was hindered by perilous delay. In his welcome advance, the larger contingent of Louisiana men fought in Gibson's brigade, Clayton's division. The Twelfth infantry, Col. N. L. Nelson, was in its old brigade (commanded by Thomas M. Scott, promoted to brigadiergen-eral) of Loring's division; Fenner's battery, Lieut. W. T. Cluverius, trained with Eldridge's battalion, now commanded by Fenner; Bouanchaud's Point Coupee artillery, with Myrick's battalion; Slocomb's Washington artillery, with Cobb's battalion; and Capt. L. M. Nutt's cavalry was with Granbury. Gibson's regiments were led as follows: First regiment, Capt. J. C. Stafford; Fourth regiment, Col. Samuel E. Hunter; Thirteenth regiment, Lieut.--Col. Francis L. Campbell; Sixteenth regiment Lieut.-Col. Robert H. Lindsay; Nineteenth regiment, Maj. Camp Flournoy; Twentieth regiment, Capt. Alexander Dressel; Twenty-fifth regiment, Col. Francis C. Zacharie; Thirtieth regime
C. W. Cushman (search for this): chapter 19
rged on all sides by the enemy, Lindsay's Sixteenth deployed as skirmishers, and Colonel Campbell and Major Flournoy, with the First, Thirteenth, Nineteenth and Twentieth, in all about 250 muskets, moved to the rear, fighting as they went. The command fought its way to the river thus, with a loss of o killed, 25 wounded, and 5 captured. A more persistent effort was never made to rout the rear guard of a retreating column, was General Lee's comment. Among the losses at Nashville were Capt. C. W. Cushman, Lieut. J. J. Cawthon, and Lieut. C. Miller killed; and Lieut. A. T. Martin, commanding sharpshooters, wounded and captured. The Point Coupee artillery, for its courage in dispersing a charging line, was complimented by Loring. On the 16th, towards 4 p. m., the enemy charged in force the battery, left and front. At this hour and on this part of the field confusion was supreme. The Point Coupee artillery, regardless of all save duty, poured double-load canister into the advancing
Allen Thomas (search for this): chapter 19
not a promotion for G. T. Beauregard, only a new field in which to show his tact and rich military experience. This was nothing less than to give a fatal blow to Thomas, organizing at Nashville. Hood willingly undertook the enterprise, but unfortunately was hindered by perilous delay. In his welcome advance, the larger continthur Picolet; Fourth battalion, Capt. T. A. Bisland; Fourteenth battalion sharpshooters, Lieut. A. T. Martin. Schofield was at Franklin, with instructions from Thomas to hold it until the post could be made secure. Hood quickly resolved to crush Schofield before he could obey Thomas' order. His troops carried the first line oThomas' order. His troops carried the first line of hastily constructed works. Behind this was an interior line, which he failed to storm against overwhelming numbers. Confederates occupied the outer line, a position of peculiar peril. The enemy held the inner line strongly manned, against which the Confederates bravely advanced, and there inside the enemy's works many fell Th
Atlanta Hood (search for this): chapter 19
Chapter 19: The Tennessee campaign under Hood Scott's brigade at Franklin the Washington artillery at Murfreesboro battle of Nashville the retreat the Louisiana brigade in the rear Guard last days of the army of Tennessee. Hood having failed to draw Sherman into Tennessee, Beauregard, now close at hand, was ster 2, 1864, to the department of the West, including the department commanded by Hood and that of Alabama, Mississippi and East Louisiana, to which Lieut.-Gen. Richaras nothing less than to give a fatal blow to Thomas, organizing at Nashville. Hood willingly undertook the enterprise, but unfortunately was hindered by perilous d, with instructions from Thomas to hold it until the post could be made secure. Hood quickly resolved to crush Schofield before he could obey Thomas' order. His tro Rousseau was at this time strongly fortified at Murfreesboro, with 8,000 men. Hood, on the way from Franklin to Nashville, stopped Bate's division long enough to
S. E. Hunter (search for this): chapter 19
y, with Myrick's battalion; Slocomb's Washington artillery, with Cobb's battalion; and Capt. L. M. Nutt's cavalry was with Granbury. Gibson's regiments were led as follows: First regiment, Capt. J. C. Stafford; Fourth regiment, Col. Samuel E. Hunter; Thirteenth regiment, Lieut.--Col. Francis L. Campbell; Sixteenth regiment Lieut.-Col. Robert H. Lindsay; Nineteenth regiment, Maj. Camp Flournoy; Twentieth regiment, Capt. Alexander Dressel; Twenty-fifth regiment, Col. Francis C. Zacharie; Thirtarching out in good order and saving the battery they supported. Fenner, who had been dealing destruction to the enemy, brought off his guns, but three of them were afterward abandoned by order of General Forrest. On the morning of the 17th Colonel Hunter, with the Fourth and Thirtieth, was put on guard in the rear, and while there was captured with his detachment. At the Harpeth river the brigade narrowly escaped entire destruction. Deserted by the cavalry, and charged on all sides by the
killed and nearly all the cannoneers of the two guns were killed or wounded, the career of the gallant battery was practically ended. Sergeant Guibert was mentioned by General Taliaferro for gallantry and energy. The Louisiana infantry, under Walthall and Loring, had their last battle at Bentonville, March 19th. In his last report, General Walthall commended the gallant services of Private E. D. Clark, Fourth Louisiana regiment, who was wounded in the performance of the duties of adjutant-geGeneral Walthall commended the gallant services of Private E. D. Clark, Fourth Louisiana regiment, who was wounded in the performance of the duties of adjutant-general of division. had made its last retreat. With all its flags streaming; with all its bugles blowing and its drums beating, with its strong files as unbroken in that final retreat as when facing its first fight; with not a commander away, not an officer absent, not a private forgotten from its proud story, the army of Tennessee, in serried ranks, horse, foot and artillery, marched in shadowy column victoriously from its last Confederate field of December 16, 1864, straight through the golde
Richard Taylor (search for this): chapter 19
gade at Franklin the Washington artillery at Murfreesboro battle of Nashville the retreat the Louisiana brigade in the rear Guard last days of the army of Tennessee. Hood having failed to draw Sherman into Tennessee, Beauregard, now close at hand, was stirring him to a bold stroke. General Beauregard had been assigned on October 2, 1864, to the department of the West, including the department commanded by Hood and that of Alabama, Mississippi and East Louisiana, to which Lieut.-Gen. Richard Taylor had been assigned. Neither of the subaltern commanders was displeased at the selection of Beauregard, who had but lately stepped from the masterly defense of Charleston. It was not a promotion for G. T. Beauregard, only a new field in which to show his tact and rich military experience. This was nothing less than to give a fatal blow to Thomas, organizing at Nashville. Hood willingly undertook the enterprise, but unfortunately was hindered by perilous delay. In his welcome ad
J. M. Clayton (search for this): chapter 19
an to give a fatal blow to Thomas, organizing at Nashville. Hood willingly undertook the enterprise, but unfortunately was hindered by perilous delay. In his welcome advance, the larger contingent of Louisiana men fought in Gibson's brigade, Clayton's division. The Twelfth infantry, Col. N. L. Nelson, was in its old brigade (commanded by Thomas M. Scott, promoted to brigadiergen-eral) of Loring's division; Fenner's battery, Lieut. W. T. Cluverius, trained with Eldridge's battalion, now commy of Tennessee this day lost all save valor. From December 1st to 15th Gibson's brigade had been incessantly working on the intrenchments before Nashville. The attack of the 5th in other quarters caused such withdrawal of troops that two of Clayton's brigades had to be scattered along the whole front previously held by the corps, and Gibson's brigade was taken out of the trenches and thrown back perpendicularly to check the enemy's advance. About midnight the division was moved back to Ov
October 2nd, 1864 AD (search for this): chapter 19
Chapter 19: The Tennessee campaign under Hood Scott's brigade at Franklin the Washington artillery at Murfreesboro battle of Nashville the retreat the Louisiana brigade in the rear Guard last days of the army of Tennessee. Hood having failed to draw Sherman into Tennessee, Beauregard, now close at hand, was stirring him to a bold stroke. General Beauregard had been assigned on October 2, 1864, to the department of the West, including the department commanded by Hood and that of Alabama, Mississippi and East Louisiana, to which Lieut.-Gen. Richard Taylor had been assigned. Neither of the subaltern commanders was displeased at the selection of Beauregard, who had but lately stepped from the masterly defense of Charleston. It was not a promotion for G. T. Beauregard, only a new field in which to show his tact and rich military experience. This was nothing less than to give a fatal blow to Thomas, organizing at Nashville. Hood willingly undertook the enterpris
December 16th, 1864 AD (search for this): chapter 19
ormance of the duties of adjutant-general of division. had made its last retreat. With all its flags streaming; with all its bugles blowing and its drums beating, with its strong files as unbroken in that final retreat as when facing its first fight; with not a commander away, not an officer absent, not a private forgotten from its proud story, the army of Tennessee, in serried ranks, horse, foot and artillery, marched in shadowy column victoriously from its last Confederate field of December 16, 1864, straight through the golden portal leading to the transcendent roadway of history. Within five months, its elder brother, the army of Northern Virginia, holding within its skeleton ranks every man, general, officer, or private, who had in its day of greatest glory belonged to it, was to retreat from Petersburg to Appomattox, and from that culminating height of heroic effort, to march without let or challenge through those same golden portals, behind which the Confederate armies, gr
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