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Browsing named entities in a specific section of John Dimitry , A. M., Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 10.1, Louisiana (ed. Clement Anselm Evans). Search the whole document.

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December, 1860 AD (search for this): chapter 2
any solicitude for the votes in the various States of the South. With the meeting of the legislature the adjutantgen-eral of the State submitted his report. He looked at the matter gloomily, holding that the sum absolutely needed to organize and arm the militia of the State will reach $1,000,000. Accompanying this discouraging report of the adjutant-general came others from the generals of division of the city of New Orleans. Suppose we transport ourselves, for an instant, back to December, 1860, and judge for ourselves what were the materials possessed by the First brigade of Louisiana as a preparation for war, then so imminent. The list is valuable, as compared with the reports of a military army later on; the latter became in time so much weightier in metal. State.Company.Total. Muskets belonging to260101361 Rifles belonging to138138 Sabers belonging to7575 6-pr. brass guns belonging to246 Knapsacks belonging to7575 Powder, lbs., belonging to300300 Round shot belo
January 23rd, 1861 AD (search for this): chapter 2
From the adjutant-general's office came another report, exhibiting the actual condition of Louisiana in regard to arms and ammunition: Cavalry pistols 6,000, sabers 3,000, muskets for cavalry 3,000, artillery 500, muskets and rifles 15,000, guns 48, ammunition to amount of $35,000. Combined, these reports make an official confession of a State's weakness. The convention, which was to decide whether Louisiana would go out of the Union or remain in it, was to meet in Baton Rouge on January 23, 1861. Secession was a burning question before it became the absorbing topic. Among those who addressed the senate, of which he was a distinguished member, was Hon. Randell Hunt. His text was the convention soon to meet, on which he spoke in able warning against precipitate action. After Mr. Hunt's address the senate, with the house of representatives, adjourned on December 12th sine die. The two houses had done the work for which the crisis needed them. Before the adjournment they had p
December 10th (search for this): chapter 2
require us to deliberate upon our own course of action; Now, therefore, I, Thomas Overton Moore, governor of the State of Louisiana, do hereby convene the Legislature of the State in extra and special session, and do appoint Monday, the 10th day of December next, at 12 o'clock m., the day and hour for the meeting of both houses of the Legislature at the Capitol in Baton Rouge. In testimony whereof, I have herewith set my hand and caused the great seal of the State to be affixed at the cityment of the State, on the 19th day of November, A. D. 1860, and of the independence of the United States of America the eighty-fifth. By the Governor, T. O. Moore. J. Hamilton hardy, Secretary of State. The legislature met at Baton Rouge December 10th. Congress had preceded its assembling—having already met December 3, 1860. It was another time in which precedents were missing. Never before, since its admission as a State, had Louisiana found its legislature in discord as to principle a
January 2nd (search for this): chapter 2
had been formed —still without officers—Numa Augustin; battalion major. A future, lost in clouds, cannot abate the composure of men entirely firm. Christmas came, and with it that good humor which belongs to the season. Every one, whether at home or on the street, seemed to put a jovial face on the ugly mask of doubt. With the beginning of 1861 those citizens in favor of united Southern action seemed suddenly to have all the noise to themselves. A mass meeting, called by them for January 2d, was addressed by a great orator of national fame, United States Senator Pierre Soule. Irad Ferry Fire Co., No. 12, hastened to hold among its members a special meeting at their hall in the same cause. Beside these, nightly meetings—the surest makers of clamor—met for co-operation at the corner of Camp street and Natchez alley. Day work was there, too, less for enthusiasm than labor. In all this flood of oratory, the opposition organized companies. The tramp, tramp of the marching men
mong the seceding States would go far to secure, through co-operation, the full success of the movement. Gov. T. O. Moore, as one of the most important factors of 1860-61, merits a good word. He proved a safe and careful pilot of the State through the troubled waters of secession. During his term, he was never quite out of sighet my hand and caused the great seal of the State to be affixed at the city of Baton Rouge, the seat of government of the State, on the 19th day of November, A. D. 1860, and of the independence of the United States of America the eighty-fifth. By the Governor, T. O. Moore. J. Hamilton hardy, Secretary of State. The legislaturthe time for talking has passed; the time for action has come. Let one word be sufficient. The Orleans artillery is ready. This was the spirit of the militia of 1860—a spirit which, since November 6th, had become changed into resolve touched with gaiete de coeur. With this gayety they had read that in fifteen Southern States t
the seceding States would go far to secure, through co-operation, the full success of the movement. Gov. T. O. Moore, as one of the most important factors of 1860-61, merits a good word. He proved a safe and careful pilot of the State through the troubled waters of secession. During his term, he was never quite out of sight ofers New Orleans had turned into a garrison town. In the Second district appeared the Orleans Guards, The Orleans Guards may boast that, among its privates in 1861, one was G. T. Beauregard. organized by the old members of the company bearing that name, once famous among that militia of which New Orleans has always been deserod humor which belongs to the season. Every one, whether at home or on the street, seemed to put a jovial face on the ugly mask of doubt. With the beginning of 1861 those citizens in favor of united Southern action seemed suddenly to have all the noise to themselves. A mass meeting, called by them for January 2d, was address
November 19th (search for this): chapter 2
re, I, Thomas Overton Moore, governor of the State of Louisiana, do hereby convene the Legislature of the State in extra and special session, and do appoint Monday, the 10th day of December next, at 12 o'clock m., the day and hour for the meeting of both houses of the Legislature at the Capitol in Baton Rouge. In testimony whereof, I have herewith set my hand and caused the great seal of the State to be affixed at the city of Baton Rouge, the seat of government of the State, on the 19th day of November, A. D. 1860, and of the independence of the United States of America the eighty-fifth. By the Governor, T. O. Moore. J. Hamilton hardy, Secretary of State. The legislature met at Baton Rouge December 10th. Congress had preceded its assembling—having already met December 3, 1860. It was another time in which precedents were missing. Never before, since its admission as a State, had Louisiana found its legislature in discord as to principle and fact with the Congress of the Unit
December 12th (search for this): chapter 2
hich was to decide whether Louisiana would go out of the Union or remain in it, was to meet in Baton Rouge on January 23, 1861. Secession was a burning question before it became the absorbing topic. Among those who addressed the senate, of which he was a distinguished member, was Hon. Randell Hunt. His text was the convention soon to meet, on which he spoke in able warning against precipitate action. After Mr. Hunt's address the senate, with the house of representatives, adjourned on December 12th sine die. The two houses had done the work for which the crisis needed them. Before the adjournment they had passed the convention bill, without amendment, appropriating for the purpose $500,000. With the passage of the bill began the struggle for delegates. The city vote was clearly in favor of immediate secession. United action with other Southern States, however, had a large following among the more prominent citizens. A paper headed The Platform of the Friends of United Southe
December 21st (search for this): chapter 2
border States; while, with faces growing stern, they had made sure that not one abolition vote had soiled the ballot-boxes of Louisiana. Thus cheerily and with strengthened resolve did the preparations of the State militia go on. It was no passing enthusiasm for the drill. It was less an idle caprice for a kepi and brass buttons. It was a steadfast purpose, showing itself in a systematic organization of independent companies and battalions. To the progress of this work the news of December 21st, which bore with it the secession of South Carolina, proved neither an impetus nor a check. No words were quite so commonly heard on the streets as drilling, organizing, election of officers, the convention, secession! Apropos, on the score of separate action, some of the parishes were at odds. Among others, the parishes of Claiborne, St. Helena and Jackson declared in favor of united Southern action. On the other hand, Plaquemine pronounced in favor of separate secession. It look
January 8th (search for this): chapter 2
e greenroom. This company of twenty-four privates called itself the Varieties Volunteers. Actors of repute were the officers—John E. Owens, comedian of renown, being the captain, and George Jordan, handsomest of walking men, first-lieutenant. Nor shall Labor hold back for the convention. The Screwmen's benevolent association—sturdy workers along the levee, still populous with boats bringing cotton, rice and sugar—enjoys its annual parade. Business and confidence touch elbows. The 8th of January, representing that battle which has so strongly inspired the spirit of the soldier of Louisiana, is to be celebrated with a muster of the city's militia. Every historic city, like Saragossa, Carthagena, Moscow, whose sons have from their native soil beaten back the invader, has a military day—a day wholly and gloriously its own. New Orleans is happy in her day. The world honors it It is hers by a double right: that of the invader's defeat and of her defender's valor. The day and the
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