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Birmingham (United Kingdom) (search for this): chapter 50
in London, and accordingly I was not with General Grant at Southampton, Brighton, Torquay, and Birmingham. Nevertheless I conducted all his correspondence with the civic functionaries, accepted his ithe exact day when I will be in London as soon as possible, and also the day when I will go to Birmingham. Yours Truly, U. S. Grant. Gen. A. Badeau. Letter no. Nineteen. The last part of tingly. On Monday the 15th we will be in London: on Wednesday, the 17th, I would like to go to Birmingham to return the next day evening. On Saturday—the 20th—we go to Brighton to be the guests of Cater making the explanation. I was under the impression that I wrote you that we would go to Birmingham on Wednesday, and telegraphed to correct the date. From your last letter however I see you wrn and Ireland, London, Oct. 18th, 1877. E. C. Dear General,—I just returned this A. M. from Birmingham. The reception there was extremely flattering, and the speeches showed not only present warmt<
Georgia (Georgia, United States) (search for this): chapter 50
Very Truly Yours, U. S. Grant. Gen. A. Badeau. Letter no. Forty-three. This letter continues the supply of information Grant was furnishing me in regard to the history of Sherman's March to the Sea. I had written for an explanation of certain dispatches which he could not recall. It was a singular situation: he was writing to me from Paris, Rome, Egypt, and from Swiss villages, accounts of his instructions to Sherman and Sheridan, his own battles on the James, and the strategy in Georgia and the Valley of Virginia, and always insisting that I should do full justice to his great lieutenants, even at the sacrifice of some of the credit that was often ascribed to himself. No reader can have failed to remark the magnanimity toward Sherman and Sheridan which these letters display;— letters written to fix, so far as he was able, the status that all three were to occupy in history; for my work he fully intended should be the only authorized expression of his views on the war.
Florence, S. C. (South Carolina, United States) (search for this): chapter 50
Dear General,—I have your letter of yesterday. I will instruct Hartog to execute your commission at once. I have written to you since my arrival here and returned the last of your manuscript. We leave here two weeks from to-day to go to Florence for a week, thence to Venice for about the same time, then to Milan and on to Paris where we expect to arrive on the 10th of May. We will remain there until about the middle of July and make our journey North, to Sweden & Norway after that. Ash Grant's sanction, and in fact it was read and revised by him in advance of publication. It is to this that he refers in the following letter. When General Grant wrote that he was tired of going all the time, he had just returned from Rome, Florence, and Venice; but from Cairo he had written: Our trip has been a most enjoyable one, and the sights exceed in colossal grandeur the guide-book descriptions. The contrast in his impressions and emotions is characteristic. The works of art and ev
Edgefield (Tennessee, United States) (search for this): chapter 50
the children's schooling, and went back to City Point where she remained,—with the exception of one or two short visits to N. J.—until Lee's surrender and my return to the National Capital. Mrs. Grant made a short visit to me—the first time after leaving Cairo—at Corinth, next at Jackson, Tenn then at Memphis where I left her when I went to Young's Point, at Young's Point one or two days before running the Vicksburg Batteries, and at Vicksburg after the surrender. She again visited me at Nashville. On leaving Ragatz we traveled to Bale, Switzerland, lay over Sunday there; thence to Strasburg where we stopped five or six hours, visiting the Cathedral, fortifications, &c.; thence to Metz for the night. The next day, until late in the afternoon, was spent in visiting points of interest in and about Metz, and in the evening we went on a few hours travel to a little town—I have forgotten the name of it—near the border of Belgium. This was to save a too early start from Metz.
Peking (China) (search for this): chapter 50
two enclosed chapters were received at Tientsin China just on the eve of my departure from there, so I brought them here to mail. The last chapter I think is one of the best in the book. It shows Early in an unpleasant light and shows the Southern character—for lying—as it should be shown. I have no corrections to suggest in either chapter. My visit through China was a pleasant one though the country presents no attractions to invite the visitor to make the second trip. From Canton to Peking my reception by the Civil & Military authorities was the most cordial ever extended to any foreigner no matter what his rank. The fact is Chinese like Americans better, or rather perhaps hate them less, than any other foreigners. The reason is palpable. We are the only power that recognize their right to control their own internal affairs. My impression is that China is on the eve of a great revolution that will land her among the nations of progress. They have the elements of great wea
Orange, N. J. (New Jersey, United States) (search for this): chapter 50
n kindest regards to you. Yours Truly, U. S. Grant. Gen. A. Badeau, U. S. Consul-General. Letter no. Fifty-six. In 1864, at the time of the Presidential election when McClellan was a candidate against Lincoln, disturbances were apprehended in New York by the Government, and General Butler was sent to that city to assist in maintaining the public peace. No disorder occurred, but General Rawlins told me shortly afterward that Butler had intended, in case of a riot, to send out to Orange where McClellan was living, and have him tried by a drum-head court-martial for inciting treason, and if found guilty, he meant to hang him at once. I have, as General Grant said, no authority for this statement but Rawlins's declaration that Butler had so assured him. Acting upon Grant's advice I did not give it a place in my history. I was expecting to return to America in the spring of 1880, to bring out the concluding volumes of my history, and had written to ask General Grant's plan
Stratford, Westmoreland co., Va. (Virginia, United States) (search for this): chapter 50
cotland. The Dukes of Sutherland and Argyll had asked me to bring him to them if he went as far north as their seats of Inverary and Dunrobin, and I now wrote to them to propose his visits. In a few days he arrived in England and at once went to Edinburgh and the Highlands, even extending his trip to John O'Groat's House, the extreme northern point of the island. By October he had returned to the south of England, stopping at Glasgow, Newcastle, Sheffield, Leeds, Sunderland, Leamington, Stratford, and Warwick, on his way, and receiving the freedom of nearly every city through which he passed. After this he paid a visit to Mr. and Mrs. Sartoris, the parents of his daughter's husband, who had a country house near Southampton. I had been absent so much from my consular post that, although this was with the sanction of the State Department, I felt that I ought now to remain for a while in London, and accordingly I was not with General Grant at Southampton, Brighton, Torquay, and Bi
Leedes (United Kingdom) (search for this): chapter 50
week to arrange for his tour in Scotland. The Dukes of Sutherland and Argyll had asked me to bring him to them if he went as far north as their seats of Inverary and Dunrobin, and I now wrote to them to propose his visits. In a few days he arrived in England and at once went to Edinburgh and the Highlands, even extending his trip to John O'Groat's House, the extreme northern point of the island. By October he had returned to the south of England, stopping at Glasgow, Newcastle, Sheffield, Leeds, Sunderland, Leamington, Stratford, and Warwick, on his way, and receiving the freedom of nearly every city through which he passed. After this he paid a visit to Mr. and Mrs. Sartoris, the parents of his daughter's husband, who had a country house near Southampton. I had been absent so much from my consular post that, although this was with the sanction of the State Department, I felt that I ought now to remain for a while in London, and accordingly I was not with General Grant at South
Titchfield (United Kingdom) (search for this): chapter 50
He now took a lively interest in the question, and when the matter was revived years afterward, he was ready to testify, in the last months of his life, in my favor. Warsash House was the residence of Mr. Sartoris. Warsash House, Titchfield, Hants, Oct. 3d 1877. Dear General,—I am in receipt of your letter enclosing Mr. Jessup's invitation and your two replies. It is of course always pleasant for me to have you with me but as I do not intend to have any public demonstrations it iy Yours, U. S. Grant. Gen. A. Badeau. Letter no. Twenty. The Mr. Walter spoken of in this letter was the proprietor of the London Times, who had invited General Grant to pay him a visit at his country seat of Bearwood. Warsash, Titchfield, Oct. 8th 1877. Dear General,—I enclose you a letter which has just been returned to me. I wish you would drop a note to Mr. Walter making the explanation. I was under the impression that I wrote you that we would go to Birmingham on Wedn
Southampton (United Kingdom) (search for this): chapter 50
, Leamington, Stratford, and Warwick, on his way, and receiving the freedom of nearly every city through which he passed. After this he paid a visit to Mr. and Mrs. Sartoris, the parents of his daughter's husband, who had a country house near Southampton. I had been absent so much from my consular post that, although this was with the sanction of the State Department, I felt that I ought now to remain for a while in London, and accordingly I was not with General Grant at Southampton, BrightSouthampton, Brighton, Torquay, and Birmingham. Nevertheless I conducted all his correspondence with the civic functionaries, accepted his invitations, public and private, and arranged his route, as I had done ever since his arrival, both on the Continent and in England. In London, the Minister, Mr. Pierrepont, directed one or two of the most important arrangements, but with this exception, all his plans were made through me, and were for the most part such as I proposed—never such as I disadvised. General A
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