hide Sorting

You can sort these results in two ways:

By entity
Chronological order for dates, alphabetical order for places and people.
By position (current method)
As the entities appear in the document.

You are currently sorting in ascending order. Sort in descending order.

hide Most Frequent Entities

The entities that appear most frequently in this document are shown below.

Entity Max. Freq Min. Freq
Francis Bernard 453 39 Browse Search
T. Hutchinson 446 0 Browse Search
Samuel Adams 378 0 Browse Search
Thomas Hutchinson 283 3 Browse Search
Massachusetts (Massachusetts, United States) 260 0 Browse Search
Thomas Gage 256 0 Browse Search
Due Choiseul 220 2 Browse Search
George Grenville 206 0 Browse Search
William Samuel Johnson 188 2 Browse Search
England (United Kingdom) 178 0 Browse Search
View all entities in this document...

Browsing named entities in a specific section of George Bancroft, History of the United States from the Discovery of the American Continent, Vol. 6, 10th edition.. Search the whole document.

Found 481 total hits in 168 results.

... 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 ...
of the House of Representatives to the Governor's Message of May 31, 1769, June 13; in Bradford's Massachusetts State Papers, 169, 171. in a message to the Governor, represented that the use of the military to enforce the laws was inconsistent with the spirit of a free Constitution, and that a standing army, in so far as it was uncontrollable by the civil authority of the Province, was an absolute power. Bernard, whose chief anxiety was to get a grant of a year's salary, Hutchinson to Bollan, 13 June, 1769. and who, for the moment, mixed Chap XLI.} 1769. May. some distrust of Hutchinson I. Williams of Hatfield to Hutchinson, 3 May, 1769. with his sudden recall, met their complaint of the presence of troops by adjourning the Legislature to Cambridge; and insisting that by the King's instruction the grant of salaries must be the first Act of the Session, he chid the House for a fortnight's non-activity, and a consequent waste of time and treasure. Message of Governor Berna
arrived at the Balise with an overwhelming force, despair prevailed for a moment; and white cockades were distributed by the Republicans. Acte d'accnsation in Gayarre. O'Reilly is not Chap. XLI.} 1769. July. come to ruin the Colony, said Aubry, who had received instructions to feign ingenuous candor. J'avais prevenu cet offly and by authority, the General will treat you with kindness, and you may have full confidence in the clemency of his Catholic Majesty. Aubry to the Minister; Gayarre, II. 292. These promises won faith; and with Aubry's concurrence a committee of three, Lafreniere for the Council, Marquis for the colonists, and Milhet for the mut effect. Tradition will have it, that the young and gallant Noyau, newly married, might have escaped; but he refused to fly from the doom of his associates. Gayarre's Louisiana, III. 338, 339. On the twenty-fifth of October, the five martyrs to their Chap. XLI.} 1769. love of France and liberty, were brought forth pinioned,
Francis Bernard (search for this): chapter 18
's Hist. III. 223. The secret Councils which Bernard now held with Hutchinson Bernard to Hillsb 12 June. 1769. After some hesitation, Bernard to Gage, 12 June, 1769. and after conferring me would have very dangerous consequences; Bernard to Gage, 19 June, 1769. and that it would be other at the castle, might be sufficient. Bernard to Gage, 26 June, 1769; Gage to Hillsborough, Message of Governor Bernard, 15 June, 1769. Bernard to Hutchinson, 17 June. No time, replied port as their first object. Message of Governor Bernard to the House of Representatives, June 21,d in Boston against the will of the Province, Bernard demanded Message of Bernard, 6 July, 1769;in your messages. To his Majesty, rejoined Bernard in his last words, and if he pleases, to his atisfaction, For the preceding jealousy of Bernard, see Andrew Oliver to Hutchinson, 22 June, 1769. Letters passed between Hutchinson and Bernard. Compare I. Williams of Hatfield to T. Hutchins[15 more...]
Thomas Marshall (search for this): chapter 18
s born in Virginia, McLung, 49. Boone was born in Bucks County, Pennsylvania, on the right bank of the Delaware river, Collins, 182. Boone was born in Maryland, Marshall, i. 17. The advancing settlements of Schuylkill, Morehead, 17. Bridgeworth, Somersetshire, England, Niles, IV. 33, confounding perhaps the birth-place of his fat Filson writes the name Boon. the illustrious hunter, had heard Finley, a trader, so memorable Compare J. T. Morehead's Address in commemoration, &c. 16, and Marshall's History of Kentucky, i. 7, 8. as the Pioneer, describe a tract of land west of Virginia, as the richest in North America or in the world. Filson's Discoveryrom Boone and Todd and Harrod. In May 1769, leaving his wife and offspring, having Finley as his pilot, and four others as Chap. XLI.} 1769. companions, the Marshall's History of Kentucky, i. 17. Morehead's Address, 17; compare J. M. Peck in the American Pioneers, i. 243. Boone died in 1820; Niles' Register, IV. 33, brings
t, they complained that their accusations which had, as they thought, been fully certified, had not been noticed at Westminster for Treason. The choice of Representatives showed the sense of the people. The town of Boston, on coming together, demanded the withdrawal of the soldiery during the election; but they were only confined within the barracks while the ballot was taken. Of five hundred and eight votes that were cast, the four old representatives, Otis, Cushing, Samuel Adams, and Hancock, received more than five hundred. They were instructed to insist on the departure of the army from the town and Province; and not to pay any thing towards its support. Bradford's Hist of Mass. i. 180. Of the ninety-two who voted not to rescind, eighty-one, probably all who were candidates, were re-elected; of the seventeen rescinders, only five. Especially Salem condemned the conduct of its former representatives and substituted two Sons of Liberty in their stead. Cambridge charg
Thomas Pownall (search for this): chapter 18
on the subject of provincial grants for the support of Government, coupled his new demand of a year's salary with an intimation, that he should give his assent to no Act, which the grant did not precede. The House, having disdainfully rejected his de- July. mand, Answer of the House of Representatives, 4 July, 1769; in Bradford, 180, 181. adopted nearly word for word the three Resolutions of Virginia Bradford's State Papers, 176, 177, and 180. on taxation, Compare S. Cooper to T. Pownall, 12 July, 1769. intercolonial correspondence, and trial by a jury of the vicinage. They also enumerated their grievances, and declared the establishment of a standing army in the Colony, in a time of peace, without consent of its General Assembly, an invasion of the natural and chartered rights of the people. For the troops thus quartered in Boston against the will of the Province, Bernard demanded Message of Bernard, 6 July, 1769; Bradford, 183. the appropriations which the Billeti
Daniel Boone (search for this): chapter 18
nks of the Yadkin River, in North Carolina, Daniel Boone, Boone was born in Virginia, McLung, 49. BBoone was born in Virginia, McLung, 49. Boone was born in Bucks County, Pennsylvania, on the right bank of the Delaware river, Collins, 182.Boone was born in Bucks County, Pennsylvania, on the right bank of the Delaware river, Collins, 182. Boone was born in Maryland, Marshall, i. 17. The advancing settlements of Schuylkill, Morehead, 1Boone was born in Maryland, Marshall, i. 17. The advancing settlements of Schuylkill, Morehead, 17. Bridgeworth, Somersetshire, England, Niles, IV. 33, confounding perhaps the birth-place of his f 1784, and authenticated by a certificate from Boone and Todd and Harrod. In May 1769, leaving his him a son of nearly twenty years old in 1773. Boone in his Narrative does not give the age of the Butler's History of Kentucky, Second Ed. 19. Boone still had his brother to share with him the daersion; The prowling wolves diverted, &c. &c. Boone, 342. and by day he had joy in surveying the vmind, as the beauties of nature I found here. Boone. Near the end of July 1770, his faithful bauthentication of the whole of this account of Boone, compare his Autobiography dictated by him in [2 more...]
James Otis (search for this): chapter 18
tatute of Henry the Eighth; and had persuaded themselves that inferior offenders would have consulted safety by betraying their leaders. Bernard to Hillsborough, 25 May, 1769. Since the propo- Chap. XLI.} 1769. May. sal to ship Samuel Adams, Otis, and their chief supporters across the water had come to naught, the cabal were left without a plan of conduct. The Regiments which had been sent at their suggestion were pronounced to be useless, because they were inactive. Disheartened by the of Boston, on coming together, demanded the withdrawal of the soldiery during the election; but they were only confined within the barracks while the ballot was taken. Of five hundred and eight votes that were cast, the four old representatives, Otis, Cushing, Samuel Adams, and Hancock, received more than five hundred. They were instructed to insist on the departure of the army from the town and Province; and not to pay any thing towards its support. Bradford's Hist of Mass. i. 180. O
Gayarreas Hist (search for this): chapter 18
rief, struggled with his guard, and fell dead from passion or from their bayonets. Martin's History of Louisiana; Gayarreas Hist. de la Louisiane, II. 305. The official report only declares, that he did Chap XLI.} 1769. Aug. not survive the firone to the King's dignity and authority in this Province is repaired. The example now given can never be effaced. Gayarreas Hist. II. 350, 351. Spaniards as well as men of other nations, censured the sanguinary revenge. In the several parisncil for the Indies found in his administration nothing but evidence of the immensity and sublimity of his genius. Gayarreas Hist. II. 378. Aubry perished on his voyage to France, in a ship which foundered in the Garonne. The son of Masan, one ominated, John F. Schermerhorn's Report concerning the Indians inhabiting the Western Parts of the United States; Mass. Hist. Coll. XII. 8. and their beautiful and fertile plains, cooled during the summer by the ever blowing West wind, were left v
Jonathan Carver (search for this): chapter 18
ettlement of the wilderness, of which France had reserved no portion and Spain and England feared to develope the resources, was promoted by native Pioneers. Jonathan Carver of Connecticut, had in three former years explored the borders of Lake Superior, and the country of the Sioux beyond it; Bernard to the Earl of Hillsboroug1 February, 1769. had obtained more accurate accounts of that Great River, which bore, as he reported, the name of Oregon The Oregon or the River of the West. Carver's Travels, 76. and flowed into the Pacific; and he now returned to claim reward for his discoveries, to celebrate the richness of the copper mines of the Northwestinent; and to propose opening, by aid of Lakes and Rivers, a passage across the continent, as the best route for communicating with China and the East Indies. Carver's Travels through the interior parts of North America, in the years 1766, 1767, and 1768. Introduction, v. VI. Illinois invited emigrants more than ever; for
... 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 ...