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Browsing named entities in a specific section of George Bancroft, History of the United States from the Discovery of the American Continent, Vol. 10. Search the whole document.

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De Grasse (search for this): chapter 6
ted for the tenth; but, learning that the British outpost on the north of the island had been withdrawn, Sullivan, on the morning of the ninth, without notice to d'estaing, crossed 9. with his troops from the side of Tiverton. Scarcely had he done so, when the squadron of Lord Howe, which had been re-enforced from England, was seen to anchor near Point Judith. On the tenth a strong 10. wind rising from the north-east, d'estaing by the advice of his officers, among whom were Suffren and de Grasse, sailed past the Newport batteries, and in order of battle bore down upon the British squadron. Lord Howe stood to the southward, inviting pursuit. For two days d'estaing was baffled in the attempt to force an action, while the wind increased to a hurri- Chap. V.} 1778. Aug. cane and wrecked and scattered both fleets. The French ship Languedoc lost its rudder and masts; the Apollo, to which the British admiral had shifted his flag, could not keep at sea. The same storm flooded Rhode
Marie Antoinette (search for this): chapter 6
y 8. expenses of the war. Gerard to Vergennes, Philadelphia, 12 August, 1778. On the eighth of July the French fleet, consisting of twelve ships of the line and three frigates, after a rough voyage of nearly ninety days from Toulon, anchored in the bay of Delaware; ten days too late to intercept the inferior squadron of Lord Howe and its multitude of transports on their retreat from Philadelphia. Its admiral, the Count d'estaing, a major-general in the French army, had persuaded Marie Antoinette to propose the expedition. On the eleventh, congress learned from his letters 11. that he was ready to co-operate with the states in the reduction of the British army and navy. The first invitation to a concert of measures revealed the inability of the American people to fulfil their engagements. For want of an organized government congress could do no more than empower Washington to call upon the six states north of the Delaware for aids of militia, while its financial measure was
e less. On the night following the thirtieth, the army of Sullivan, evading 30. its sluggish pursuers, withdrew from the island. Clinton, with a re-enforcement of four thousand men, landed the day after the escape. 31. The British general returned to New York, having Sept. accomplished nothing, except that a detachment under Grey set fire to the shipping in New Bedford, and then levied cattle and money on the freeholders of Martha's Vineyard. Lord Howe gave up the naval command to Admiral Byron, and was never again employed in America. The people of New England had in twenty days raised the force of Sullivan to ten thousand effective men; the total disappointment of their hope of brilliant success excited criminations and distrust. At Boston a French officer lost his life in attempting to quell a riot between his countrymen and American seamen; but d'estaing preserved unruffled politeness, and really wished well to the United States. Notwithstanding the failure of the fi
ved the least hope that the colonies could be subjected by force. Some British statesmen thought to retain a political, or at least a commercial, connection; while many were willing to give them up unconditionally. Even before the surrender of Burgoyne, Gibbon, a member of the Board of Trade, confessed that, though England had sent to America the greatest force which any European power ever ventured to transport into that continent, it was not strong enough to attack its enemy, nor to prevent ug., 1777. After that surrender, In 1847 the Archbishop of York, whose memory went back to those days, and who was with Thomas Grenville in Paris in 1782, told me, that after the affair of Bunker Hill very many persons, after the surrender of Burgoyne almost every one, gave up the expectation that England would be able to enforce the dependence of the colonies. he agreed that, Chap. V.} 1778. since the substance of power was lost, the name of independence might be granted to the Americans.
George Bryan (search for this): chapter 6
the manner of choosing one branch of the legislature, but also because it took from the chief of the executive his veto power. The majority, soon recovering from their consternation, determined to vote no taxes until the veto should be reversed. After a three days Chap. V.} 1778. adjournment, which was required by the rules before a rejected bill could be again brought forward, Rawlins Lowndes, the newly elected president, gave his sanction to the re-enacted bill. Richard Hutson to George Bryan, from Charleston, S. C., 14 March, 1778. John Rutledge to Henry Laurens, 16 Feb., 1778, and 8 March, 1778. In F. Moore's Materials for History, 94, 103-106. Ramsay's History of South Carolina, i. 129-138. The new constitution might be altered by legislative authority after a notice of ninety days. None but freeholders could elect or be elected to office; and for the higher offices the possession of a large freehold was required. In any redistribution of the representation of the s
ecked and scattered both fleets. The French ship Languedoc lost its rudder and masts; the Apollo, to which the British admiral had shifted his flag, could not keep at sea. The same storm flooded Rhode Island with rain, damaged the ammunition of the American army, overturned their tents, and left them no shelter except trees and fences. Many horses were killed, and even soldiers perished. The British troops, being quartered in the town, suffered less; and, on the return of fair weather, Pigot, but for his inertness, might have fallen upon a defenceless enemy. The squadron of Lord Howe steered for Sandy Hook. D'Estaing, three of whose ships had severally encountered three English ships, appeared on the twentieth within sight of Newport; but only to an- 20. nounce that, from the shattered condition of his fleet, and from want of water and provisions, after nearly five months service at sea, he was compelled by his instructions to sail for Boston. In general orders Sullivan ce
C. J. Fox (search for this): chapter 6
ith the war. Chat. Cor., IV. 488. Donne, II. 123. On the second of February, Fox spoke against its continuance, went over the whole of the American business, and reply; and on the division several tories voted with him. Donne, II. 123. C. J. Fox to Mr. Fitzpatrick, in Correspondence of C. J. Fox, i. 168. English opinion hC. J. Fox, i. 168. English opinion had by this time resigned itself to the belief that the United States could not be reduced; but as a massive fountain, when its waters are first let loose, rises slowdred years contest with the crown for the bulwark of English freedom. But now Fox would have England instantly declare their independence; Donne, II. 154, 17 Mates, IX. 69. Tories began to vote against the ministry. Correspondence of C. J. Fox, i. 168. The secretary of war, Lord Barrington, said to the king: The general to a treaty of peace with the new state. Earl Russell, in Correspondence of C. J. Fox, i. 201, 202. To that end all elements conspired. The initial velocity of t
Henry Laurens (search for this): chapter 6
was placed over the district of Rhode Island, to throw the American troops into two divisions, he sent Greene to command the one, and Lafayette the other. Young Laurens served d'estaing as aid and interpreter. On the twenty-ninth of July, while Clinton was reporting to Germain that he would probably be under the necessity of eva American right wing, and thus cut off every chance of escape. On that side Greene, almost within sight of his native town, held the command. Supported by young Laurens, he changed the defence into an attack, and drove the enemy in disorder back to their strong post on Quaker hill. In the engagement the British lost at least twonewly elected president, gave his sanction to the re-enacted bill. Richard Hutson to George Bryan, from Charleston, S. C., 14 March, 1778. John Rutledge to Henry Laurens, 16 Feb., 1778, and 8 March, 1778. In F. Moore's Materials for History, 94, 103-106. Ramsay's History of South Carolina, i. 129-138. The new constitution
d been concerted for the tenth; but, learning that the British outpost on the north of the island had been withdrawn, Sullivan, on the morning of the ninth, without notice to d'estaing, crossed 9. with his troops from the side of Tiverton. Scarcely had he done so, when the squadron of Lord Howe, which had been re-enforced from England, was seen to anchor near Point Judith. On the tenth a strong 10. wind rising from the north-east, d'estaing by the advice of his officers, among whom were Suffren and de Grasse, sailed past the Newport batteries, and in order of battle bore down upon the British squadron. Lord Howe stood to the southward, inviting pursuit. For two days d'estaing was baffled in the attempt to force an action, while the wind increased to a hurri- Chap. V.} 1778. Aug. cane and wrecked and scattered both fleets. The French ship Languedoc lost its rudder and masts; the Apollo, to which the British admiral had shifted his flag, could not keep at sea. The same storm
d Shelburne was provoked into saying that he never would serve with any man who would consent to its independence, when in truth independence was become the only way to peace. The menaces of the proclamation were a confession of weakness. The British army under Clinton could hold no part of the country, and only ravage and destroy by sudden expeditions. Towards the end of Sept. September Cornwallis led a foray into New Jersey; and Major-General Grey with a party of infantry, surprising Baylor's light horse, used the bayonet mercilessly against men that sued for quarter. A band led by Captain Patrick Ferguson in October, Oct. after destroying the shipping in Little Egg harbor, spread through the neighboring country to burn the houses and waste the lands of the patriots. On the night of the fifteenth they surprised light infantry under Pulaski's command; and, cumbering themselves with no prisoners, killed all they could. In November a large party of Indians with bands of Nov.
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