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Browsing named entities in The Daily Dispatch: January 24, 1861., [Electronic resource].

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West Point (Georgia, United States) (search for this): article 1
The National crisis. Hon. Sherrard Clemens in the House — the contemplated Seizure of the Brooklyn Navy Yard — a battery Erected on the Mississippi river--letter from Ex-President Fillmore--salute for an Ex-commander, &c. Capt. Alfred Cumming, late Governor of Utah, a graduate of West Point, and for sixteen years connected with the United States Army, was elected Lieutenant-Colonel of the Augusta (Ga.) Independent Volunteer Battalion on Saturday. Col. Cumming will immediately resign his captaincy in the Federal army. The Chicago Zouaves have offered their services to the United States Government. The Mulenburg Riflemen, of Shenandoah county, Va., fired one hundred and fifty guns on the 21st instant, in honor of the workingmen of New York city, who lately adopted resolutions sympathizing with the South. General Twiggs has declared his purpose to adhere to his gallant State of Georgia, and to resign his position in the present army whenever Georgia sha
Edgefield (Tennessee, United States) (search for this): article 1
his gallant State of Georgia, and to resign his position in the present army whenever Georgia shall secede.--Mobile Advertiser. The New York Senate has adopted complimentary resolutions to Gov. Hicks, of Maryland, for his position. The Waynesboro (Ga.) News says that the "Burke Sharpe Shooters" at a late meeting elected twenty-six "unqualified secession and determined-on- resistance ladies" as honorary members of the company. Eight of them are unmarried. Byrd Douglas, of Nashville, Tenn., has sent a donation of $1,000 to the Governor of South Carolina. In Florida, the ladies of the families of Messrs. Robert Gamble and Robert W. Williams have offered their services in any manner available for preparing the troops for the field of battle. Sherrard Clemens, of Va., in the House. The following occurrence took place in the U. S. House of Representatives, on Tuesday: Mr. Clemens, of Virginia, said he spoke as a Southern man, identified by birth, education
the banks, shores and beds of the rivers and creeks in the western part of the State. The 1st section of chapter 62 of the Code of Virginia, in alluding to the above recited acts, declares that "all the lands which remained ungranted by the former government, and which have been used as a common by-way to all the people of the State, shall continue to be such." These repeated and emphatic prohibitions have estopped the passage of any title by the register for any such lands in the East since 1780, and in the West since 1802, which reunited migranted by the Colonial Government. The Auditor of Public Accounts alludes to the subject in his recent communication to the General Assembly, and we insert his concluding remarks, as they possess local interest. He says: "In 1675 Governor Berkeley granted William Byrd 7,351 acres of land on the north side of the James River, beginning at the mouth of Shockoe Creek, and running up said river; and in 1687 William Byrd obtained a grant o
January 15th (search for this): article 1
erefrom will be monopolized by a few individuals, and the poor laid under contribution for exercising the accustomed privilege of fishing." For the reason stated, the lands so referred to which remained "ungranted by the former covenant," (meaning that of the English,) were excepted out of said act, and it was declared that no grant issued by the Register of the Land Office for the same thereafter should be valid to pass any estate or interest therein. A similar law was made on the 15th January, 1802, in reference to the banks, shores and beds of the rivers and creeks in the western part of the State. The 1st section of chapter 62 of the Code of Virginia, in alluding to the above recited acts, declares that "all the lands which remained ungranted by the former government, and which have been used as a common by-way to all the people of the State, shall continue to be such." These repeated and emphatic prohibitions have estopped the passage of any title by the register for any s
way to all the people of the State, shall continue to be such." These repeated and emphatic prohibitions have estopped the passage of any title by the register for any such lands in the East since 1780, and in the West since 1802, which reunited migranted by the Colonial Government. The Auditor of Public Accounts alludes to the subject in his recent communication to the General Assembly, and we insert his concluding remarks, as they possess local interest. He says: "In 1675 Governor Berkeley granted William Byrd 7,351 acres of land on the north side of the James River, beginning at the mouth of Shockoe Creek, and running up said river; and in 1687 William Byrd obtained a grant of 956 acres on the north side of said river, beginning at the mouth of Shockoe Creek, and running down said river. --Neither grant appears to include either the banks or beds of the said James River or Shockoe Creek, nor the islands in James River opposite and near the city of Richmond. The channel
f the English,) were excepted out of said act, and it was declared that no grant issued by the Register of the Land Office for the same thereafter should be valid to pass any estate or interest therein. A similar law was made on the 15th January, 1802, in reference to the banks, shores and beds of the rivers and creeks in the western part of the State. The 1st section of chapter 62 of the Code of Virginia, in alluding to the above recited acts, declares that "all the lands which remained ungraen used as a common by-way to all the people of the State, shall continue to be such." These repeated and emphatic prohibitions have estopped the passage of any title by the register for any such lands in the East since 1780, and in the West since 1802, which reunited migranted by the Colonial Government. The Auditor of Public Accounts alludes to the subject in his recent communication to the General Assembly, and we insert his concluding remarks, as they possess local interest. He says:
May, 1780 AD (search for this): article 1
Commonwealth's Lands.--The General Assembly, in May, 1780, passed an act which may be found in Henning's Statutes at Large, ch. 2, page 226, for the purpose of securing "to the public certain lands held as common. " The lands referred to were "unappropriated lands on the bay, sea and river shores, in the Eastern parts of this Commonwealth." It is further stated, that in the "act establishing a land office, and ascertaining the terms and manner of granting waste and unappropriated lands," no reservation thereof is made, but the same "is now subject to be entered for and appropriated by any person or persons, whereby the benefits formerly derived to the public therefrom will be monopolized by a few individuals, and the poor laid under contribution for exercising the accustomed privilege of fishing." For the reason stated, the lands so referred to which remained "ungranted by the former covenant," (meaning that of the English,) were excepted out of said act, and it was declar
Commonwealth's Lands.--The General Assembly, in May, 1780, passed an act which may be found in Henning's Statutes at Large, ch. 2, page 226, for the purpose of securing "to the public certain lands held as common. " The lands referred to were "unappropriated lands on the bay, sea and river shores, in the Eastern parts of this Commonwealth." It is further stated, that in the "act establishing a land office, and ascertaining the terms and manner of granting waste and unappropriated lands," no reservation thereof is made, but the same "is now subject to be entered for and appropriated by any person or persons, whereby the benefits formerly derived to the public therefrom will be monopolized by a few individuals, and the poor laid under contribution for exercising the accustomed privilege of fishing." For the reason stated, the lands so referred to which remained "ungranted by the former covenant," (meaning that of the English,) were excepted out of said act, and it was decla
ny such lands in the East since 1780, and in the West since 1802, which reunited migranted by the Colonial Government. The Auditor of Public Accounts alludes to the subject in his recent communication to the General Assembly, and we insert his concluding remarks, as they possess local interest. He says: "In 1675 Governor Berkeley granted William Byrd 7,351 acres of land on the north side of the James River, beginning at the mouth of Shockoe Creek, and running up said river; and in 1687 William Byrd obtained a grant of 956 acres on the north side of said river, beginning at the mouth of Shockoe Creek, and running down said river. --Neither grant appears to include either the banks or beds of the said James River or Shockoe Creek, nor the islands in James River opposite and near the city of Richmond. The channel of Shockoe Creek within the city of Richmond has been changed by artificial means for necessary improvements. That which was at a former day the bed of Shockoe Cree
a common by-way to all the people of the State, shall continue to be such." These repeated and emphatic prohibitions have estopped the passage of any title by the register for any such lands in the East since 1780, and in the West since 1802, which reunited migranted by the Colonial Government. The Auditor of Public Accounts alludes to the subject in his recent communication to the General Assembly, and we insert his concluding remarks, as they possess local interest. He says: "In 1675 Governor Berkeley granted William Byrd 7,351 acres of land on the north side of the James River, beginning at the mouth of Shockoe Creek, and running up said river; and in 1687 William Byrd obtained a grant of 956 acres on the north side of said river, beginning at the mouth of Shockoe Creek, and running down said river. --Neither grant appears to include either the banks or beds of the said James River or Shockoe Creek, nor the islands in James River opposite and near the city of Richmond.
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