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Tom Corwin (search for this): article 16
nt of the Mexicans. The Houston Telegraph, of the 10th, contains the following important item: Our Brownsville correspondent gives unimportant piece of information regarding the movements across the Rio Grande. The sham fight at Matamoras is, of course, unworthy of further attention, but the approach of Vidaurri, with 7,000 men, to make his headquarters at Matamoras, as a representative of the Mexican Federal government, the government that has been making the late treaties with Tom Corwin, that receives a loan of ten millions and protection from the United States, for some purpose or other — we say this military movement demands attention, and measures should at once be taken to keep the closest watch on the doings of that republic. A force of 7,000 Mexicans, joined to as many Northern troops, might give us some trouble, especially if supported by raids upon our coast. It still looks as though Texas might be a theatre of war within a twelvemonth or less. From the Po
U. S. Senator (search for this): article 16
ently injured by the stumbling of his horse, has sufficiently recovered to resume his duties during the coming week. The assault on Gen. Montgomery. Capt. Chapman and Lieut McHenry, who committed the murderous assault on Gen. Montgomery, at Alexandria, on Saturday, are to be tried by court-martial immediately. There is no doubt, as it is a plain case, but that they will be sentenced to be shot. They may escape the death penalty through the intercession of Gen. Montgomery. U. S. Senator from Missouri. St. Louis, Jan. 20. --John B. Henderson has been appointed, by Lieut. Gov. Wall, U. S. Senator, to fill the vacancy occasioned by the expulsion of Truston Polk. Mr. Henderson is a Douglas Democrat, and an uncompressing Union man. He was a member of the State Convention, and a Brigadier General in the State service. Late from the Rio Grande — important movement of the Mexicans. The Houston Telegraph, of the 10th, contains the following important item:
ess is represented as prevailing among the people of that region. It is rumored to-day in town that Gen. Hindman is to be superseded by come other officer. What foundation there exists for the report I have not been able to ascertain. His acts above are understood to have been performed under military orders reluctantly given, as a rigorous, though an imperious, necessity of the times. The possession and occupancy of the property destroyed, by the Federal, (who say they will be ready in a few days to come in force against us,) would have aided them no little in their monstrous designs upon the South. Miscellaneous. Mr. Davids, of Massachusetts, from the Committee on Elections, reported that Joe. Segar was not entitled to a seat in the House of Representatives has member from the 1st District of Virginia. Mr. Vallandighan had asked have to make a motion to abolish the Post-Office Department. The privateersmen from Philadelphia have been sent to Fort Lafayette.
court- martials, &c., but, as before remarked, it may all be idle rumor. Operations of Gen. Hindman in Kentucky. The Bowling Green correspondence of the Nashville Banner, writing under its recent date, furnishes the following interesting intelligence of the operations of Gen. Hindman's forces: In my last, mention was made of the burning of Cave City, Horse Cave, Rowletts, etc., by the forces of Gen. Hindman, which have for some time been stationed at Glasgow Junction. Since the date of writing, more full particulars of his transactions have been received. After having effectthe extreme. Scarcely anything in the shape of articles of sustenance remain along the line of Hindman's march. He drove off quantities of live stock, and many cattle and hogs were killed and left represented as prevailing among the people of that region. It is rumored to-day in town that Gen. Hindman is to be superseded by come other officer. What foundation there exists for the report I hav
ll arrive to-morrow. The object of the expedition, it now appears, was a reconnaissance in force of all that part of Kentucky in which a portion of the operations against Columbus will necessarily be performed, and a demonstration to aid General Buell's right wing. Our forces have been eminently successful, and the engineer corps, under Col. Webster, have a full and accurate knowledge of the country. It is understood that Gen. Smith has taken the camp equipage and whatever was left in Cathe financial view taken by Secretary Chase. It also approves of General McClellan's defensive position upon the Potomac; but he thinks that offensive operations by the Federal columns are the best plans for driving the rebels out of Kentucky. Gen. Buell is made the subject of high commendation. Gen. Sumner, commanding a division of the army in Virginia, who was recently injured by the stumbling of his horse, has sufficiently recovered to resume his duties during the coming week. The
ss is represented as prevailing among the people of that region. It is rumored to-day in town that Gen. Hindman is to be superseded by come other officer. What foundation there exists for the report I have not been able to ascertain. His acts above are understood to have been performed under military orders reluctantly given, as a rigorous, though an imperious, necessity of the times. The possession and occupancy of the property destroyed, by the Federal, (who say they will be ready in a few days to come in force against us,) would have aided them no little in their monstrous designs upon the South. Miscellaneous. Mr. Davids, of Massachusetts, from the Committee on Elections, reported that Joe. Segar was not entitled to a seat in the House of Representatives has member from the 1st District of Virginia. Mr. Vallandighan had asked have to make a motion to abolish the Post-Office Department. The privateersmen from Philadelphia have been sent to Fort Lafayette.
ay. A battery of the 1st Missouri Light Artillery, under command of Maj. Schofield, started from this city yesterday, and probably reach Pilot Knob this morning. The rebels had not destroyed any more of the bridges. The Big river bridge is being rapidly rebuilt. From Cairo — return of Federal troops from a grand reconnaissance to Columbus. Cairo, Jan. 20. --(Special dispatch to the Chicago Journal.)--General Grant and his staff arrived in town yesterday morning.--General Paine's brigade reached Fort Jefferson on Saturday, and General McClernand's brigade will arrive to-morrow. The object of the expedition, it now appears, was a reconnaissance in force of all that part of Kentucky in which a portion of the operations against Columbus will necessarily be performed, and a demonstration to aid General Buell's right wing. Our forces have been eminently successful, and the engineer corps, under Col. Webster, have a full and accurate knowledge of the country.
ir respects to him. A letter has been received here from Hon. James Guthrie, the distinguished Secretary of the Treasury under Franklin Pierce's Administration, which generally sustains the financial view taken by Secretary Chase. It also approves of General McClellan's defensive position upon the Potomac; but he thinks that offensive operations by the Federal columns are the best plans for driving the rebels out of Kentucky. Gen. Buell is made the subject of high commendation. Gen. Sumner, commanding a division of the army in Virginia, who was recently injured by the stumbling of his horse, has sufficiently recovered to resume his duties during the coming week. The assault on Gen. Montgomery. Capt. Chapman and Lieut McHenry, who committed the murderous assault on Gen. Montgomery, at Alexandria, on Saturday, are to be tried by court-martial immediately. There is no doubt, as it is a plain case, but that they will be sentenced to be shot. They may escape the death
. It is understood that Gen. Smith has taken the camp equipage and whatever was left in Camp Beauregard, the rebels having fled to Columbus. General McClernand's brigade went to within seven miles of Columbus, and encamped on Thursday night in eight of the rebel watch-fires. He afterwards visited the towns of Millburn, Lovelaceville, and Blandville, surveying all the roads as he went. A part of Gen. Smith's command will return to Paducah to-day. Reach sentiment at the North. Forney, in his letter to the Press, from Washington says: "Some of our public men do not hesitate to say that, rather than bring back the seceded States into the Union, they would agree to a peaceful and prompt separation," And again: "There is an active party in the loyal States, which, under cover of being for the Union, are at work to force a dishonorable peace, by sowing the seeds of disaffection among the people." From Manassas the Confederates Evacuating their position.
s attacked and forced — death of Gen. Zollicoffer. Cincinnati, Jan. 20. --A combined attach was made to-day on Gen. Zollicoffer's entrenchments, by Gen. Schoepff and General Thomas, resulting in a complete victory. The Stars and Stripes how wave over the rebel fortifications. Our troops captured all the camp p Gen. Zollicoffer, learning that the Federal forces had appeared in his rear, marched out of his entrenchment at 3 o'clock on Saturday morning, and attacked Gen. Schoepff in his camp. Our pickets were driven in at an early hour on Saturday morning, and before daylight the attack was made. The battle is said to have raged wvision — a Brilliant victory at Somerset, Ky. Cincinnati Jan. 20. --A battle was fought at Somerset, Ky., on Saturday, between the Federal troops under Gen. Schoepff, and the rebels under General Zollicoffer. The engagement was commenced in the morning, and lasted till nightfall. Gen. Zollicoffer was killed, and hi
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