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rear, and that it will not be long before we shall have the pleasure of announcing a crushing defeat of the rebels in that quarter. Meantime, in accordance with the instructions of Gen. McClellan, the army of Gen. Buell is steadily encircling the great rebel camp at Bowling Green. This is a strong defensive position, the village being surrounded by a circle of abrupt and commanding hills, which are occupied by rebel fort, and batteries. We are assured, however, that the programs of General Buel, for the capture of Bowling Green is one which cannot fall. Before the expiration of the present month, therefore, with any improvement upon the late blockading snows, thaws, and rains, we expect to hear the glorious news of the expulsion of the rebels from both Columbus and Bowling Green. A rebel army, including both places, of over a hundred and twenty thousand men, will thus be cut up and dispersed, Kentucky and Tennessee will be instantly liberated, and the sustaining spirit of this
een the Cumberland and the Mississippi is attached to the department of General Halleck, there will be, under his direction, a combined movement of all his disposable forces from Fort Henry, Mayfield, Paducah, Smithland, and Cairo, including Commodore Porter's gun-boats, upon Columbus, in front, flank and rear, and that it will not be long before we shall have the pleasure of announcing a crushing defeat of the rebels in that quarter. Meantime, in accordance with the instructions of Gen. Mct length so admirably distributed and so thoroughly equipped and provided for active work, and are so well drilled and so ably commanded by such approved officers as McClellan, Buell, Halleck, Wool, Burnside, Sherman, Dupont, Goldsborough, Foote, Porter, and others, and the rebellion is so manifestly in the last throes of exhaustion, that our faith is stronger than ever, and strengthens every day, in the conviction that before England and France can agree to interfere there will be an end of Jef
at Price and his guerillas will be left on the soil of Missouri; or that the Burnside expedition will be confined to reconnaissances of the inland waters of North Carolina; or that the powerful fleet of Dupont and the co-operating land forces of Sherman will be idle; or that our land and naval forces in Florida and on Ship Island, within convenient distance of New Orleans and Mobile. Will remain resting upon their oars; or that Gen. Wool will be limited to the daily routine of Fortress Monroe; Our land and naval forces are at length so admirably distributed and so thoroughly equipped and provided for active work, and are so well drilled and so ably commanded by such approved officers as McClellan, Buell, Halleck, Wool, Burnside, Sherman, Dupont, Goldsborough, Foote, Porter, and others, and the rebellion is so manifestly in the last throes of exhaustion, that our faith is stronger than ever, and strengthens every day, in the conviction that before England and France can agree to
Goldsborough (search for this): article 4
ire against this beleaguered rebellion, the echoes of which will be heard from the Mississippi overland to the Potomac, and from the Potomac to the Carolinas, and thence along the seaboard and Gulf coast to the swamps of Louisiana. Our land and naval forces are at length so admirably distributed and so thoroughly equipped and provided for active work, and are so well drilled and so ably commanded by such approved officers as McClellan, Buell, Halleck, Wool, Burnside, Sherman, Dupont, Goldsborough, Foote, Porter, and others, and the rebellion is so manifestly in the last throes of exhaustion, that our faith is stronger than ever, and strengthens every day, in the conviction that before England and France can agree to interfere there will be an end of Jeff. Davis and his spurious Southern Confederacy. In this view we are powerfully supported by the patriotic action of Congress, in its seasonable legislation to relieve the financial embarrassments of the Government and the country.
asury Note bill was received from the House, and referred to the Finance Committee. The bill authorizing an additional issue of ten million dollars of demand notes was passed. Resolutions of the Legislature of Rhode Island, urging the propriety of permanently locating the Naval Academy at Newport was presented. A joint resolution, giving the thanks of Congress to Captain Dupont and his officers and seamen for the victory at Port Royal, was adopted. The Judiciary Committee reported that Mr. Starke, the Senator from Oregon, whose loyalty has been questioned was entitled to take the constitutional oath. A minority report was, however, presented, and the papers were ordered to be printed. In the House of Representatives, the Treasury Note bill was by consent amended so as to allow the Treasury Department, at its option, to pay the interest on Government bonds in coin or paper. At the conclusion of the debate, Mr. Holman, of Indiana, offered a resolution, censuring Mr. Cameron, t
McClernand (search for this): article 4
vernment in relation to the transmission of telegraphic dispatches are imperatively demanded by the public welfare, and interfere with neither the private rights of citizens nor the interests of the Telegraph company. "the Circle of fire closing round the Rebellion." Under this caption the Herald, of the 8th, publishes the following article: We congratulate our readers upon another important Union victory in the West. Our splendid Western soldiers, under Generals Grant and McClernand, who, in their first encounter with the rebels at Belmont, exhibited the fighting qualities of Napoleon's Old Guard, have marched into the occupation of the valuable strategic defences of Fort Henry on the Tennessee river. Our troops occupy a good position at Fort Henry from which to advance westward upon Columbus, or eastward upon Bowling Green, in the rear — the two strongholds of the rebels in Western Kentucky, and upon the maintenance of which depends the rebel cause, not only in
ve the pleasure of announcing a crushing defeat of the rebels in that quarter. Meantime, in accordance with the instructions of Gen. McClellan, the army of Gen. Buell is steadily encircling the great rebel camp at Bowling Green. This is a strong defensive position, the village being surrounded by a circle of abrupt and commadmirably distributed and so thoroughly equipped and provided for active work, and are so well drilled and so ably commanded by such approved officers as McClellan, Buell, Halleck, Wool, Burnside, Sherman, Dupont, Goldsborough, Foote, Porter, and others, and the rebellion is so manifestly in the last throes of exhaustion, that our fnot resign in consequence of the change which the censor allowed us partially to indicate last night, but will strive in the Department of the Potomac to rival General Buell in Kentucky and General Halleck in Missouri, on a level with whom the new arrangement places him. It is understood that he has consulted with several of his Ge
ry soon open in a circle of fire against this beleaguered rebellion, the echoes of which will be heard from the Mississippi overland to the Potomac, and from the Potomac to the Carolinas, and thence along the seaboard and Gulf coast to the swamps of Louisiana. Our land and naval forces are at length so admirably distributed and so thoroughly equipped and provided for active work, and are so well drilled and so ably commanded by such approved officers as McClellan, Buell, Halleck, Wool, Burnside, Sherman, Dupont, Goldsborough, Foote, Porter, and others, and the rebellion is so manifestly in the last throes of exhaustion, that our faith is stronger than ever, and strengthens every day, in the conviction that before England and France can agree to interfere there will be an end of Jeff. Davis and his spurious Southern Confederacy. In this view we are powerfully supported by the patriotic action of Congress, in its seasonable legislation to relieve the financial embarrassments of the
ugh the Secretary claimed that none of the sellers censured him, Mr. Van Wyck referred to the sale of the Mercedita, where the owners claimed to have been wronged by this system of purchase, and they had notified the Secretary. In this case Mr. Morgan claimed and took $2,500 commissions, when he did nothing towards negotiating the sale. Mr. Morgan claimed to have been asked for this vessel $130,000, and the owners testify they allowed the department to fix the price. That the sale of 5,000 Hall's carbines, by Simon Stevens to Gen. Fremont, was an inconceivable bargain, whereby, without any risk or investment of capital, Mr. Stevens was in one day to realize $50,000. That in the Department of the West, through the agency of Quartermaster McKinstry and his inspectors, Government was plundered of many thousands. That although Generals and Cabinet Ministers were buried beneath the weight of increasing responsibility, this rock less horde were undermining the very ground on which they t
ds, upon which certified allotments the Secretary shall cause drafts to be made, payable in the city of New York or Boston, to the order of such persons to whom the allotments were or may be made, and to remit the drafts to the address of such persons as may be designated. War Department and the Telegraph. The President of the American Telegraph Company leaves Washington for New York to-morrow morning. Frequent and satisfactory interviews with the Secretary of War have convinced Mr. Sanford that the measures adopted by the Government in relation to the transmission of telegraphic dispatches are imperatively demanded by the public welfare, and interfere with neither the private rights of citizens nor the interests of the Telegraph company. "the Circle of fire closing round the Rebellion." Under this caption the Herald, of the 8th, publishes the following article: We congratulate our readers upon another important Union victory in the West. Our splendid Wester
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