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Joseph Hooker (search for this): article 8
justice to General Casey, which has since been repaired by an explanatory dispatch. General Casey's division, though weak, and much reddened by sickness, stood its ground splendidly, as its long record of killed and wounded proves. Brigadier-General Hooker. Brigadier-General Joseph Hooker commands a division of the army of the Potomac, and has distinguished himself exceedingly at the battle of Fair Oaks and the other conflicts of the campaign in Virginia. He was born in MassachusetBrigadier-General Joseph Hooker commands a division of the army of the Potomac, and has distinguished himself exceedingly at the battle of Fair Oaks and the other conflicts of the campaign in Virginia. He was born in Massachusetts, about the year 1817, and is consequently about 45 years of age. --He entered West Point in 1833, and graduated in the artillery in 1837. At the outbreak of the war with Mexico he accompanied Brigadier-General Hamer as aide-de-camp, and was brevetted Captain for gallant conduct in several conflicts at Monterey, in March, 1847, he was appointed Assistant Adjutant General, with the rank of Captain. At the National Bridge he distinguished himself, and was brevetted Major; and at Chapellepec,
February 23rd, 1847 AD (search for this): article 8
native of Kentucky. He is a son of Governor Nathaniel Pope, of Virginia, who went to Kentucky before the birth of John, and, after living in Kentucky a few years removed to Illinois John, the son, entered the West Point Academy in 1838. He graduated in 1842, and was appointed to the army from the State of Illinois, entering the service as a Brevet 3d Lieutenant for gallant and meritorious conduct in several conflicts at Monterey, the brevet bearing date from September . On the 23d of February, 1847, he was brevetted Captain for gallant and meritorious conduct at the battle of Vista. On the 1st of July, 1862 he took the actual rank of Captain in the corps of Topographical Engineers, and on the 17th of May, 1861, was made a Brigadier-General of volunteers. His brilliant movement in Central Mississippi tended as much as anything to restores place to that State, and his brilliant of New led to the evaluation of that place. Since its first possession by our troops Gen. has
July 1st, 1862 AD (search for this): article 8
on of Governor Nathaniel Pope, of Virginia, who went to Kentucky before the birth of John, and, after living in Kentucky a few years removed to Illinois John, the son, entered the West Point Academy in 1838. He graduated in 1842, and was appointed to the army from the State of Illinois, entering the service as a Brevet 3d Lieutenant for gallant and meritorious conduct in several conflicts at Monterey, the brevet bearing date from September . On the 23d of February, 1847, he was brevetted Captain for gallant and meritorious conduct at the battle of Vista. On the 1st of July, 1862 he took the actual rank of Captain in the corps of Topographical Engineers, and on the 17th of May, 1861, was made a Brigadier-General of volunteers. His brilliant movement in Central Mississippi tended as much as anything to restores place to that State, and his brilliant of New led to the evaluation of that place. Since its first possession by our troops Gen. has held New Madridgin force.
sey, which has since been repaired by an explanatory dispatch. General Casey's division, though weak, and much reddened by sickness, stood its ground splendidly, as its long record of killed and wounded proves. Brigadier-General Hooker. Brigadier-General Joseph Hooker commands a division of the army of the Potomac, and has distinguished himself exceedingly at the battle of Fair Oaks and the other conflicts of the campaign in Virginia. He was born in Massachusetts, about the year 1817, and is consequently about 45 years of age. --He entered West Point in 1833, and graduated in the artillery in 1837. At the outbreak of the war with Mexico he accompanied Brigadier-General Hamer as aide-de-camp, and was brevetted Captain for gallant conduct in several conflicts at Monterey, in March, 1847, he was appointed Assistant Adjutant General, with the rank of Captain. At the National Bridge he distinguished himself, and was brevetted Major; and at Chapellepec, he again attracted att
grazing country and wheat country to subsist a large army. This involves, as a necessity, a continued and undisturbed rebel occupation of the plains and valleys of Virginia. Their Generals. From some of the Northern papers we take sketches of three of the Federal Generals, commencing with the unhappy. Brigadier-General Silas Casey. Brigadier-General Silas Casey commanded the advance division at the battle of Fair Oaks. --General Casey was born in Rhode Island about the year 1806; entered West Point in 1822; graduated in 1826, and entered the Seventh infantry; was promoted to First Lieutenant in June, 1836, and Captain in July, 1839. In the Florida war Captain Casey served with distinction under General Worth. He served also throughout the Mexican war, and added still further to his reputation for gallantry. At Contreras and Churubusco be distinguished himself, and received the braver of Major. At the assault on Chapuitepec he led the storming party, and was sever
May 17th, 1861 AD (search for this): article 8
outbreak of the rebellion found him there, and he was one of the first of the old West Pointers who offered his services to the Government. He was one of the first batch of Brigadier-Generals of volunteers appointed by President Lincoln on 17th May, 1861; and was, on his arrival, placed in command of a brigade of the army of the Potomac, and subsequently of a division. From July, 1861. to February, 1862. he was stationed in Southern Maryland, on the north shore of the Potomac, his duty beingmber . On the 23d of February, 1847, he was brevetted Captain for gallant and meritorious conduct at the battle of Vista. On the 1st of July, 1862 he took the actual rank of Captain in the corps of Topographical Engineers, and on the 17th of May, 1861, was made a Brigadier-General of volunteers. His brilliant movement in Central Mississippi tended as much as anything to restores place to that State, and his brilliant of New led to the evaluation of that place. Since its first poss
June 21st, 1862 AD (search for this): article 8
ome changes here within the last few days. Our squadron is lying this P. M. off City, Point, Contrabands bring the intelligence that the Confederates claim to have lost one man killed and one man's arm shot off in the fight on the 20th, at Watkins's Bluff. It that is all, they came off very lucky We, as I stated before, had no one injured in the least, although they claim to have killed 20 men, as we are also informed by contrabands: United States Steamer Jacon Bell.James River, June 21, 1862. Sir: I respectfully submit the following: Yesterday, in obedience to your orders I proceeded with the dispatches up the river to the Manitor.--On passing the Red Bluff, known as Watkins's Bluff, I was opened upon by two batteries, three pieces, each of 12 pounders, add about 500 sharp shooters. The channel being very narrow, being obliged to go within a few feet of the Bluff, I suffered severely. The had of bullets from the sharpshooters prevented me for a time from respondin
August, 1861 AD (search for this): article 8
General Worth. He served also throughout the Mexican war, and added still further to his reputation for gallantry. At Contreras and Churubusco be distinguished himself, and received the braver of Major. At the assault on Chapuitepec he led the storming party, and was severely wounded. For this he received the brevet of Lieutenant Colonel. At the outbreak of the rebellion Colonel Casey was one of the first to offer his services to the Government, and obtained command of a brigade in August, 1861. On the reorganization of the army under Gen. McClellan he was appointed to the command of a division in Gen. Heintzelman's corps. General McClellan's first dispatch, written hastily on the field of battle, did some injustice to General Casey, which has since been repaired by an explanatory dispatch. General Casey's division, though weak, and much reddened by sickness, stood its ground splendidly, as its long record of killed and wounded proves. Brigadier-General Hooker. Bri
February, 1862 AD (search for this): article 8
e war with Mexico he withdrew from the service, and soon afterward emigrated to California. The outbreak of the rebellion found him there, and he was one of the first of the old West Pointers who offered his services to the Government. He was one of the first batch of Brigadier-Generals of volunteers appointed by President Lincoln on 17th May, 1861; and was, on his arrival, placed in command of a brigade of the army of the Potomac, and subsequently of a division. From July, 1861. to February, 1862. he was stationed in Southern Maryland, on the north shore of the Potomac, his duty being to prevent the rebels crossing the river, and to amuse them with their river stockade while McClellan was getting his army into trim. This difficult duty he performed admirably. Maj. Gen. John Pope. Major-Gen. John Pope is a man about forty years of age, and a native of Kentucky. He is a son of Governor Nathaniel Pope, of Virginia, who went to Kentucky before the birth of John, and, after
July, 1861 AD (search for this): article 8
t the close of the war with Mexico he withdrew from the service, and soon afterward emigrated to California. The outbreak of the rebellion found him there, and he was one of the first of the old West Pointers who offered his services to the Government. He was one of the first batch of Brigadier-Generals of volunteers appointed by President Lincoln on 17th May, 1861; and was, on his arrival, placed in command of a brigade of the army of the Potomac, and subsequently of a division. From July, 1861. to February, 1862. he was stationed in Southern Maryland, on the north shore of the Potomac, his duty being to prevent the rebels crossing the river, and to amuse them with their river stockade while McClellan was getting his army into trim. This difficult duty he performed admirably. Maj. Gen. John Pope. Major-Gen. John Pope is a man about forty years of age, and a native of Kentucky. He is a son of Governor Nathaniel Pope, of Virginia, who went to Kentucky before the birth of
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