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Browsing named entities in a specific section of The Daily Dispatch: December 23, 1862., [Electronic resource]. Search the whole document.

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Gen. Jackson, of the Pennsylvania Reserves; Col. Zinn, 132d Pennsylvania; Lt-Col. Dickinson, 4th U. S. artillery; Lt. Col. Curtis, 4th Rhode Island; Lt. Col. Sayles, 7th Rhode Island; Major Horgan, 88th New York: Capt. Kelly, 14th Indiana, and Capt Meagher, 7th New York. Amongst the wounded are the names of Gens. Vinton, Gibbon, Kimball, Caldwell, and Campbell none of them dangerously. Cols Sinclair, 5th Pa; N H Nugent, 69th N Y; Wiseman, 28th N J; Snyder, 7th Va; Miles, 61st N Y; Andrews, enemy occupied the heights. In this emergency a council of war was held; all the corps commanders opposed an advance; but Burnside said, in conclusion, that he was compelled to advance by orders from Washington. The reported wounding of Gen. Meagher is a mistake. His horse fell upon him, but he was only slightly injured, and is still in command of what remains of his brigade. Matters in the West. Dates from Nashville to the 10th show that the dispatches to the press on that day,
Lt. Col. Curtis, 4th Rhode Island; Lt. Col. Sayles, 7th Rhode Island; Major Horgan, 88th New York: Capt. Kelly, 14th Indiana, and Capt Meagher, 7th New York. Amongst the wounded are the names of Gens. Vinton, Gibbon, Kimball, Caldwell, and Campbell none of them dangerously. Cols Sinclair, 5th Pa; N H Nugent, 69th N Y; Wiseman, 28th N J; Snyder, 7th Va; Miles, 61st N Y; Andrews, 1st Delaware; McGregor, 10th Mass; Hatch, 4th N J. Lt. Cols Geo Dane, 6th Pa; Goodman, 4th Ohio. Majors Goeccompanied by a young fellow who is to act as his secretary. Then there is an ugly, wicked, piratical looking person, with piercing gray eyes, and long flowing brown and gray beard, perhaps fifty years old, whom they call "Captain." His name is Campbell, as I learn, a Scotchman by birth, but long a resident of the South, and I think by his appearance he may have been a pilot at Charleston or Savannah. This person is to take command of one of the gunboats; and I pity any unfortunate crew that m
to night, Gen. Burnside declared that he would renew the contest in the morning. There is, to my mind however, little probability that this will be done, or can be done. It is likely that the council of Generals-- composed of Burnside, Summer, Hooker, and Franklin — now meeting at this house, will shake this determination, as I know they are all opposed to the measure. Indeed, one has only to go over to Fredericksburg, where the army is now huddled, and see its shattered and broken condition's grand division, which in- cluded two divisions of Stoneman's corps, is. In killed, 443; wounded, 3,343; missing, 1,900. There is reason to believe that the greater portion of the wounded are made prisoners. The loss in Gen. Sumner's and Hooker's grand divisions, which made the assault upon the enemy's works, cannot be fully ascertained as yet but sufficient is known to justify the assertion that our loss in killed and wounded will reach ten to twelve thousand in the battle of Saturday.
. Kelly, 14th Indiana, and Capt Meagher, 7th New York. Amongst the wounded are the names of Gens. Vinton, Gibbon, Kimball, Caldwell, and Campbell none of them dangerously. Cols Sinclair, 5th Pa; N H Nugent, 69th N Y; Wiseman, 28th N J; Snyder, 7th Va; Miles, 61st N Y; Andrews, 1st Delaware; McGregor, 10th Mass; Hatch, 4th N J. Lt. Cols Geo Dane, 6th Pa; Goodman, 4th Ohio. Majors Goebel, 7th New York; C. C Knight, L19th Pennsylvania; Jennings, 26th New York; O'Nell, 63d New York. Bardwell, of Pennsylvania; Cavanaugh, 69th New York; Philbrook, 16th Massachuset is. Captains Cameroon, 9th New York; Carpenter, 91st New York; Hart, Assistant Adjutant General to Gen. Tyler; Andrew Mahoney. 19th Massachusetts; M. Dunn, 19th Massachusetts, Hendrickson, 9th New York, G. G. Weymonth and J. R. Smith, 136th Pennsylvania; Slater, 15th N York; Leddy, 69th New York; Houghton; 14th Indiana; Burke, 88th New York; Donnovan, 69th New York; Cartwright, 63d New York. Our total loss in
ves; Col. Zinn, 132d Pennsylvania; Lt-Col. Dickinson, 4th U. S. artillery; Lt. Col. Curtis, 4th Rhode Island; Lt. Col. Sayles, 7th Rhode Island; Major Horgan, 88th New York: Capt. Kelly, 14th Indiana, and Capt Meagher, 7th New York. Amongst the wounded are the names of Gens. Vinton, Gibbon, Kimball, Caldwell, and Campbell none of them dangerously. Cols Sinclair, 5th Pa; N H Nugent, 69th N Y; Wiseman, 28th N J; Snyder, 7th Va; Miles, 61st N Y; Andrews, 1st Delaware; McGregor, 10th Mass; Hatch, 4th N J. Lt. Cols Geo Dane, 6th Pa; Goodman, 4th Ohio. Majors Goebel, 7th New York; C. C Knight, L19th Pennsylvania; Jennings, 26th New York; O'Nell, 63d New York. Bardwell, of Pennsylvania; Cavanaugh, 69th New York; Philbrook, 16th Massachuset is. Captains Cameroon, 9th New York; Carpenter, 91st New York; Hart, Assistant Adjutant General to Gen. Tyler; Andrew Mahoney. 19th Massachusetts; M. Dunn, 19th Massachusetts, Hendrickson, 9th New York, G. G. Weymonth and J. R. Smith, 136
nge of the dead bodies was resumed and continued until completed. On Monday afternoon Gen. Lee sent a flag of truce to Gen. Burnside, asking him to detail men to bury his dead in front of Gen Sumner's grand division. This was done. The wounded, with the exception of those the enemy obtained, have all been brought to this side of the Rappahannock, and as rapidly as possible are being sent to Washington. The loss in Franklin's grand division, which in- cluded two divisions of Stoneman's corps, is. In killed, 443; wounded, 3,343; missing, 1,900. There is reason to believe that the greater portion of the wounded are made prisoners. The loss in Gen. Sumner's and Hooker's grand divisions, which made the assault upon the enemy's works, cannot be fully ascertained as yet but sufficient is known to justify the assertion that our loss in killed and wounded will reach ten to twelve thousand in the battle of Saturday. During the flag of truce Gen Stuart, of the rebel army,
f Gens. Vinton, Gibbon, Kimball, Caldwell, and Campbell none of them dangerously. Cols Sinclair, 5th Pa; N H Nugent, 69th N Y; Wiseman, 28th N J; Snyder, 7th Va; Miles, 61st N Y; Andrews, 1st Delaware; McGregor, 10th Mass; Hatch, 4th N J. Lt. Cols Geo Dane, 6th Pa; Goodman, 4th Ohio. Majors Goebel, 7th New York; C. C Knight, L19th Pennsylvania; Jennings, 26th New York; O'Nell, 63d New York. Bardwell, of Pennsylvania; Cavanaugh, 69th New York; Philbrook, 16th Massachuset is. Captains Cameroon, 9th New York; Carpenter, 91st New York; Hart, Assistant Adjutant General to Gen. Tyler; Andrew Mahoney. 19th Massachusetts; M. Dunn, 19th Massachusetts, Hendrickson, 9th New York, G. G. Weymonth and J. R. Smith, 136th Pennsylvania; Slater, 15th N York; Leddy, 69th New York; Houghton; 14th Indiana; Burke, 88th New York; Donnovan, 69th New York; Cartwright, 63d New York. Our total loss in officers and men is variously stated at from five to ten thousand. The plan of the battl
r Savannah. This person is to take command of one of the gunboats; and I pity any unfortunate crew that may fall within his heartless grasp, if his face is a fair index of the soul within. I understand that he has been successfully engaged of late in running the blockade at the South. With this party are two black haired, dark eyed, olive complexioned men, whom, I think, may be called French Creoles. One of these, the elder; perhaps forty-five or fifty years of age, is said to be Colonel Lamar, late of the rebel army, and a prisoner in our hands at the first battle of Bull Run. He has the air of a person of education and refinement, and yet has a most wicked glance of mingled scorn and contempt, ready to meet the Yankee whenever he ventures near him. His companion's name I have not as yet been able to ascertain; but he appears so like the one I have described that I have thought that he must have been a brother.-- What part these parties are to play, I am unable to divine. I
mity of the war. How the army is to be extricated from these predicaments, I am unable to devise. I trust that those entrusted with its fortunes have the ability to do it. Among the officers reported as killed at the battle of Fredericksburg are Gen. Bayard, of the cavalry; Gen. Jackson, of the Pennsylvania Reserves; Col. Zinn, 132d Pennsylvania; Lt-Col. Dickinson, 4th U. S. artillery; Lt. Col. Curtis, 4th Rhode Island; Lt. Col. Sayles, 7th Rhode Island; Major Horgan, 88th New York: Capt. Kelly, 14th Indiana, and Capt Meagher, 7th New York. Amongst the wounded are the names of Gens. Vinton, Gibbon, Kimball, Caldwell, and Campbell none of them dangerously. Cols Sinclair, 5th Pa; N H Nugent, 69th N Y; Wiseman, 28th N J; Snyder, 7th Va; Miles, 61st N Y; Andrews, 1st Delaware; McGregor, 10th Mass; Hatch, 4th N J. Lt. Cols Geo Dane, 6th Pa; Goodman, 4th Ohio. Majors Goebel, 7th New York; C. C Knight, L19th Pennsylvania; Jennings, 26th New York; O'Nell, 63d New York. Bardw
Gen Sumner (search for this): article 5
hich the enemy immediately recognized, and the exchange of the dead bodies was resumed and continued until completed. On Monday afternoon Gen. Lee sent a flag of truce to Gen. Burnside, asking him to detail men to bury his dead in front of Gen Sumner's grand division. This was done. The wounded, with the exception of those the enemy obtained, have all been brought to this side of the Rappahannock, and as rapidly as possible are being sent to Washington. The loss in Franklin's grand division, which in- cluded two divisions of Stoneman's corps, is. In killed, 443; wounded, 3,343; missing, 1,900. There is reason to believe that the greater portion of the wounded are made prisoners. The loss in Gen. Sumner's and Hooker's grand divisions, which made the assault upon the enemy's works, cannot be fully ascertained as yet but sufficient is known to justify the assertion that our loss in killed and wounded will reach ten to twelve thousand in the battle of Saturday. Dur
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