hide Sorting

You can sort these results in two ways:

By entity
Chronological order for dates, alphabetical order for places and people.
By position (current method)
As the entities appear in the document.

You are currently sorting in descending order. Sort in ascending order.

hide Most Frequent Entities

The entities that appear most frequently in this document are shown below.

Entity Max. Freq Min. Freq
John Tyler 45 1 Browse Search
Mexico (Mexico, Mexico) 42 0 Browse Search
United States (United States) 40 0 Browse Search
John Hagan 32 0 Browse Search
Vera Cruz (Veracruz, Mexico) 32 0 Browse Search
Maryland (Maryland, United States) 18 0 Browse Search
Edward A. Pollard 18 0 Browse Search
Biloxi (Mississippi, United States) 14 0 Browse Search
France (France) 14 0 Browse Search
John S. Caskie 11 1 Browse Search
View all entities in this document...

Browsing named entities in a specific section of The Daily Dispatch: January 20, 1862., [Electronic resource]. Search the whole document.

Found 199 total hits in 106 results.

... 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11
Edward Sweeney (search for this): article 1
nd Captain Hugh McQuade, who were also prisoners, have both died, the latter of wounds received at Bull Run. The following are the names of the returned prisoners; Serg't Chas W. Fairfield, company D; Frederick Hoefer company C; W, H. Millett, company G; Patrick McGinnley and John Hirst, company C; Michael Dowting, company F; Adolphus Keller, company C; Jas. H. Hart, company B; Ferd. Kelley, company B; Michael McGrain, company B; Luther L. Mills, company A; Jas. A. Coburn, company K; Ed. Sweeney, company G; Henry Hege, company G; Hugh F. Dunnigan, company H; Chas Redecker, company G; John Tyler, company D; Samuel Van Duger, company I; Wm. Fielding, company F; Wm. H. Brees, company l; Henry Van Orman, company K; Augustus Gauss, company C; Ed. N. Kellogg, company B, and Edw. L. Marsh, company E. Total, twenty-four. Another letter from Dempsey, the Yankee prisoner. From the New York Herald, of the 15th instant, we copy the following letter, from J. W. Dempsey, who, it will
.Santa Fe. (search for this): article 1
Fort Union. Kansas City, Mo, Jan. 13. --The Santa Fe mail has arrived, with dates to December 29. Two thousand Texan troops are reported to be marching up the Rio Grand river for the purpose of attacking Fort Craig, and the same number marching up the Tocos river to attack Fort Union. The troops stationed at Fort Wise have been ordered to New Mexico. Fort Union is well prepared to receive an at tack; but fears are entertained that Fort Craig will be taken and the Texans advance on Santa Fe. Considerable excitement prevails in that place. A strange Juxtaposition. The Boston Traveller, of the 13th instant, says: Five officers of the British army reached this city on Friday last, in the steamer from Europe, on their way to Canada, preparatory to fighting the United States, should a war with England occur. They stopped at a hotel, and their names were recorded upon the register. Later in the day focus officers of the Confederate army, just released from Fort Warr
re on a bank within two hundred yards of the bridge, pouring in bullets at such a rate that the attempt to burn and tear up the floor were both abandoned. Col. Dunning then ordered his men men to charge on the bridge and over it, and compelling a negro woman at Blue's house to show him the road up to the left. He fed the Fif; whole voifeys of musketry were heard, and it was soon discovered that the rebels were firing from behind a breastwork on the top of the mountain. As soon as Col. Dunning discovered this he ordered his men to fix bayonets and charge.--While this was being done the rebels left in haste for their camp, at the foot of the mountain firing had nearly ceased on the mountains, the Eighth Ohio led the way down the Gap, followed by the First Virginia, Seventh Ohio and the Fourth Indiana. Colonel Dunning having passed on and taken the two pieces of artillery, with their caissons and horses also a wagon and horses, with the Ohio regiment returned and ordered th
Hugh McQuade (search for this): article 1
n the same prison with these men at Richmond. Not one of them would speak with him, and their contempt was so great that a rope was prepared to hang him in the prison. The authorities found it necessary to confine him in the prison with the citizens, This speaks well for the character of our soldiers. Sixty-five members of this regiment are yet held as prisoners of war in various portions of the South, including Major J. D. Potter and Lieutenant Thomas Hamblin. Surgeon Griswold and Captain Hugh McQuade, who were also prisoners, have both died, the latter of wounds received at Bull Run. The following are the names of the returned prisoners; Serg't Chas W. Fairfield, company D; Frederick Hoefer company C; W, H. Millett, company G; Patrick McGinnley and John Hirst, company C; Michael Dowting, company F; Adolphus Keller, company C; Jas. H. Hart, company B; Ferd. Kelley, company B; Michael McGrain, company B; Luther L. Mills, company A; Jas. A. Coburn, company K; Ed. Sweeney, compan
the 21st of July, and four while on picket at Munson's Hill, on the 28th of August --were paid off at Washington on the 13th inst., and returned to the camp of their regiment in Virginia under direction of Lieutenant W. Banks. They halted at Colonel Ward's quarters, and gave him three times three hearty cheers, as their commanding officer at the Hull Run battle. An over whelming outburst of congratulation and applause from the entire regiment, a hearty welcome from the Colonel, and suitable ronths, imprisonment at Richmond, treated more like dogs than men, that not even one would consent to accept the furlough offered by the War Department until they first returned to their regiment and placed themselves again under the command of Colonel Ward. The account given by these men is conclusive that the Federal prisoners in the hands of the rebels are patriotic and true men. Not long since a private from this regiment deserted and went over to the enemy, and was placed in the same pri
McClernand (search for this): article 1
. Reconnaissance near Columbus — movements of Union troops. The gun-boats Essex, St Louis, and Tyler made a reconnaissance down the river today. They approached within a mile and a half of Columbus, and fired several shots into the rebel camps. The rebels returned the fire from three or four guns without doing any damage to our boats. The effect of our shells is unknown. No obstruction in the river nor masked batteries on shore were discovered, as before reported. General McClernand's column moved in the direction of Blandville, Ky., to-day. Gen. Paine's force moved forward this morning from Bird's Point. The Second regiment of the Douglas Brigade will arrive to-night. The Seventh Lowa, Eighth Wisconsin, and Forty-fifth Illinois are expected to-morrow. Operations of the Confederates at Cave city, Ky. Louisville, Jan. 14. --The rebels of Hammond's command, encamped up the river, on Sunday night burned the depot and black smith's shop, an
have relieved their sufferings in many ways. If my letters have not been received, I fear their friends and themselves will think I have forgotten them. I sent you the names of all the wounded from Richmond last August. If you receive it save it, as I have lost the copy. I have written to Colonel Tompkins and Captain Decorsey, but got no answer. You will be delighted to learn Colonel Corcoran and the officers confined with him are in good health. They were removed here with us. Lieutenants Connolly and Underhill, in fact all the officers and men, are in good health. My dear wife, I received my trunk and box, together with four letters from you, on Christmas Eve. From circumstances that I will here after explain, it was impossible for me to write until New Year's morning. Your likeness and little Mary's was my only company this anniversary of the birth of Christ. When you write say if you got my letter dated 1st of January. Do not send me any money, as I have made arrangement
Augustus Gauss (search for this): article 1
W, H. Millett, company G; Patrick McGinnley and John Hirst, company C; Michael Dowting, company F; Adolphus Keller, company C; Jas. H. Hart, company B; Ferd. Kelley, company B; Michael McGrain, company B; Luther L. Mills, company A; Jas. A. Coburn, company K; Ed. Sweeney, company G; Henry Hege, company G; Hugh F. Dunnigan, company H; Chas Redecker, company G; John Tyler, company D; Samuel Van Duger, company I; Wm. Fielding, company F; Wm. H. Brees, company l; Henry Van Orman, company K; Augustus Gauss, company C; Ed. N. Kellogg, company B, and Edw. L. Marsh, company E. Total, twenty-four. Another letter from Dempsey, the Yankee prisoner. From the New York Herald, of the 15th instant, we copy the following letter, from J. W. Dempsey, who, it will be remembered, wrote a letter from the Charleston prison some time since, in which he took occasion to utter many falsehoods with regard to the treatment of Federal prisoners in the South: Columbia, S. C., Jan. 4, 1862. My De
number. Marshall's whole army is now flying in utter confusion. He had abandoned and burned a large quantity of stores. We have taken fifteen prisoners. Our loss was two killed and one wounded. I start in pursuit to-morrow morning. J. A. Garfield, Commanding Brigade, Brigade, Prestonsburg, Ky,. Jan. 11, 1862. Capt. J. B. Fry, Assistant Adj't-Gen: I left Paintsville on Thursday noon with 1,100 men, and drove in the enemy's pickets two miles below Prestonsburg The men sleptoners, ten horses and a quantity of stores. The enemy burned most of his stores, and fled precipitately in the night. To-day I have crossed the river, and am now occupying Prestonsburg Our loss is two killed and twenty-five wounded. J. A. Garfield, Colonel Commanding Brigade. Interesting from Missouri--troops ordered to March from Rolla — movements of Gen. Price, &c. Sedalia, Mo., Jan. 14 --Advices have reached here that the 1st Kansas regiment, which was sent from here
has made within four weeks. The released prisoners from Richmond returned to camp. The special Washington correspondent of the New York Herald writes as follows: The following named twenty-four exchanged prisoners from Richmond--twenty taken at the battle of Bull Run, on the 21st of July, and four while on picket at Munson's Hill, on the 28th of August --were paid off at Washington on the 13th inst., and returned to the camp of their regiment in Virginia under direction of Lieutenant W. Banks. They halted at Colonel Ward's quarters, and gave him three times three hearty cheers, as their commanding officer at the Hull Run battle. An over whelming outburst of congratulation and applause from the entire regiment, a hearty welcome from the Colonel, and suitable refreshments, was their reception. It is remarkable in these soldiers, badly wounded in many instances, and having suffered five and a half months, imprisonment at Richmond, treated more like dogs than men, that not
... 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11