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the carriages and ordnance stores. These guns, however, would not have answered for what was required for the armament at the south end of Morris Island or Black Island. Some guns reported to be of the class wished for having, as I understood, arrived from Europe at Wilmington, were asked for, and refused. As the enemy persisted in his occupation, although the works were not completed at the south end of Morris Island, the armament was increased by a captured 30-pounder Parrott, a light Whitworth, and three 10-inch seacoast mortars. It was, I have understood, intended to have constructed bombproof and hospital arrangements at the south end of Morris Island; but they had hardly been commenced. To the 4th Question.—In my opinion it would have been possible, had the works at the south end of the island been completed, and with the small force at our disposal, for the enemy by a bold dash from their ironclads and gunboats to have cut off the retreat of the troops south of Craig's H
n, doing away with elections and promotion by seniority, a more summary mode of dropping worthless officers, the improvement of the cavalry arm (the point so forcibly dwelt upon by you), and some stringent remedy for the absenteeism of officers. Upon all these subjects my committee has been at work and framed bills which we hope may prove efficacious if adopted by Congress. I send you a copy of our Cavalry Bill as it passed our House. It is now pending in the Senate. It was drawn by General Wickham, a distinguished cavalry officer, now a member of my committee, and meets with General Wade Hampton's warm approval, as well as that of various distinguished cavalry officers whom we were able to consult. I have written Governor Magrath concerning the condition of things in South Carolina, and would be glad if you would read the letter which I have requested him to show you. Very truly yours, Wm. Porcher miles. I received your telegram with reference to General J., Genera
W. H. Wigg (search for this): chapter 26
and men performed their duties with spirit and celerity. During the action the flag-staff was cut down by a shot from the enemy, which, in falling, struck Private Lusby, Company F, 1st South Carolina Infantry, causing his death in a few minutes. This was the only casualty of any importance. One gunner, Private Harrison, Company G, lost a finger by some inadvertence in running a gun into battery, but returned to his post after getting his wound dressed. When the flag was struck down Captain W. H. Wigg, A. C. S., promptly placed the regimental flag in a conspicuous place upon a traverse. Captain W. H. Wardlaw, A. Q. M., and Lieutenant and Adjutant Mitchell King and First-Lieutenant D. G. Calhoun were likewise prompt in placing the battle and garrison flags in conspicuous positions. Major T. M. Baker, 1st South Carolina Infantry, was wherever his services would be most useful. The ordnance officer, Second-Lieutenant Thomas Williams, was at his post at the magazine. Much credit is
Cadmus Wilcox (search for this): chapter 26
ssing—aggregate 922, including Colquitt's brigade, and omitting Gracie's. The losses of the enemy were estimated at that time, from such information as we gathered, at between five and six thousand. I suppose accurate statements can be now commanded. I have not time to be concise or to write with any care, or even to read over this paper. I have heard that all the credit has been given, by some one publishing his views, to Mahone's division. I think this has been rebutted by General Cadmus Wilcox, of New Orleans. You can accumulate facts from him and General Beauregard, as well as from officers named in command—especially Colonel McMaster. Columbia, S. C., Feb. 14th, 1872. To Genl. G. T. Beauregard, New Orleans: Dear Sir,—General W. H. Wallace, the commander of Evans's old brigade and successor of General Stephen Elliott, sent me, in December last, your letter of November 13th, 1871, forwarded through General Bonham, with the request that I should give you the report of<
Molony fell, shot through the head, and Hagood and Stoney alone reached the works—the latter shot in the shoulder, but not disabled. The 25th and 21st regiments being on the left, from the oblique direction of the advance, first struck the works; and while they staggered to get in the other three regiments swept on. When they reached the ditch there was from seventy-five to one hundred yards interval between the two divisions into which the brigade had broken. General Hagood was with Major Wilds, commanding the 21st, who was cheering on his men to renewed assault (success now being their only hope of safety), when, looking to the right, he saw a mounted Federal officer among the men on the left of the portion of the brigade to the right with a regimental color in his hands, and a confusion and parleying immediately around him that betokened approaching surrender. The fight was still raging at Hagood's right and left; there was no cessation on our part except in the squad just ar
Thomas Williams (search for this): chapter 26
getting his wound dressed. When the flag was struck down Captain W. H. Wigg, A. C. S., promptly placed the regimental flag in a conspicuous place upon a traverse. Captain W. H. Wardlaw, A. Q. M., and Lieutenant and Adjutant Mitchell King and First-Lieutenant D. G. Calhoun were likewise prompt in placing the battle and garrison flags in conspicuous positions. Major T. M. Baker, 1st South Carolina Infantry, was wherever his services would be most useful. The ordnance officer, Second-Lieutenant Thomas Williams, was at his post at the magazine. Much credit is due to him for the good condition of the gun-carriages and the ordnance stores. I have already submitted a report of the amount of ammunition expended. The guns engaged consisted of nine 8-inch columbiads, five 32-pounder rifled and banded guns, five smooth-bore 32-pounders, and two 10-inch mortars. I am, Sir, very respectfully, your obedient servant, William Butler, Col. 1st S. C. Infantry, Comdg. Report of Colonel Al
George Williamson (search for this): chapter 26
who, I hope, will be allowed to remain with me: Officers brought with me. Captains John M. Otey and Alb. Ferry, Assistant Adjutant-Generals. Officers ordered here. Colonel D. B. Harris, Engineer; Majors Henry Bryan and Giles B. Cook, Assistant Adjutant-Generals, as inspectors. Offcers Required to Complete my General Staff. 1. Chief of Staff. Brigadier-General Thomas Jordan, if his services can be obtained; otherwise, Colonel G. W. Brent, or Major S. W. Melton, or Colonel George Williamson, who was assistant adjutant-general to General Polk at Corinth. 2. Chief of Artillery. Lieutenant-Colonel C. C. Jones, now Chief of Artillery to General Mercer for the District of Georgia. 3. Chief of Ordnance. Lieutenant-Colonel J. R. Waddy, now Chief of Ordnance, Department South Carolina, Georgia, and Florida, as soon as he can be spared; if he cannot, then Captain James Harding, in charge of a cap-factory near Savannah, or any good ordnance officer (of General Bragg's c
Edward Willis (search for this): chapter 26
ched him, owing to delays on roads. Losses not yet reported. G. T. Beauregard. Charleston, S. C., May 18th, 1876. Mr. E. Willis: Dear Sir,—In answer to your request, and also that it will be a pleasure to do anything in my power for General By, A. A. G. 5. Colonel D. B. Harris, Chief-Engineer of Department. 6. Surgeon S. Choppin, Medical Inspector. 7. Major Willis, Chief Quartermaster. 8. Major Molloy, Chief Commissary. personal Staff. 1. Lieutenant A. R. Chisolm, A. D. C. at Catawba bridge. Troops must continue to march along railroad, and trains will take up the first they meet with. Major E. Willis, at Salisbury, my chiefquartermas-ter, will attend to your transportation wants. G. T. Beauregard. Telegd Clerk. Ordnance Department. Lieut.-Col. J. R. Waddy, Chief Ordnance officer. Quartermaster's Department. Major E. Willis, Chief Quartermaster. Lieut. Jno. J. Mellen, Crescent La. Regt., A. A. Quartermaster. Private Henry C. Robinson,
S. W. Wilson (search for this): chapter 26
n down on the road and fall in with ours of the 30th. I can hardly estimate how many animals fit for farm purposes will be loaned to the farmers, but enough, I hope, to insure a crop. I can hardly commit myself how far commerce will be free, but I think the cotton still in the country, and the crude turpentine, will make money with which to procure supplies. General Schofield, in a few days, will be able to arrange all such matters. I wish you would send the enclosed parcel for General Wilson, as it contains the Orders, 65 and 66, and instructions to release all his prisoners on the conditions of our convention. Now that war is over, I am as willing to risk my person and reputation as heretofore to heal the wounds made by the past war, and I think my feeling is shared by the whole army. I also think a similar feeling actuates the mass of your army; but there are some unthinking young men, who have no sense or experience, that unless controlled may embroil their neighbors.
the available forces of the State, exempting, however, any one who will return an absentee to the army. G. T. Beauregard. Telegram. Augusta, Feb. 6th, 1865. To Commanding Officer, Columbia, S. C.: It is still uncertain whether enemy, after reaching Branchville, will move on Augusta, Columbia, or Charleston. He may move on two last at once, without our being able to check him long. Make, accordingly, all necessary preparations. Communicate this to Governor Magrath and General Winder. G. T. Beauregard. Telegram. Grahams, Feb. 6th, 1865:11.50 P. M. Genl. Beauregard: Enemy will certainly take possession of railroad to-morrow, and I shall get between him and Augusta. I have sent one brigade to reinforce Colonel Crews, who is now between enemy and Augusta; should he move towards Columbia I will cross bridge above and get in his front. I have ordered all bridges below Holman's bridge destroyed. J. Wheeler, Major-Genl. Telegram. Charleston,
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