hide Sorting

You can sort these results in two ways:

By entity (current method)
Chronological order for dates, alphabetical order for places and people.
By position
As the entities appear in the document.

You are currently sorting in ascending order. Sort in descending order.

hide Most Frequent Entities

The entities that appear most frequently in this document are shown below.

Entity Max. Freq Min. Freq
Virginia (Virginia, United States) 190 0 Browse Search
Grant 139 23 Browse Search
Washington (United States) 102 0 Browse Search
Jefferson Davis 96 0 Browse Search
Stonewall Jackson 88 0 Browse Search
S. D. Lee 86 0 Browse Search
Braxton Bragg 84 2 Browse Search
Manassas, Va. (Virginia, United States) 72 0 Browse Search
United States (United States) 70 0 Browse Search
Stephen Lee 64 0 Browse Search
View all entities in this document...

Browsing named entities in Thomas C. DeLeon, Four years in Rebel capitals: an inside view of life in the southern confederacy, from birth to death..

Found 5,274 total hits in 1,573 results.

... 153 154 155 156 157 158
, reaching there on the 27th of June. Hooker, falling rapidly back upon Washington-at which point he believed the movement aimed-had been sacrificed, and with more justice than usual, to popular clamor. General Geo. G. Meade replaced him in command, and strained every nerve to collect numbers of men, irrespective of quality — seeming to desire to crush the invasion by weight alone. Wild was the alarm in the North when the rebel advance had, penetrated the heart of Pennsylvania; when York was held by Early and laid under contribution and Harrisburg was threatened by Ewell. The whole North rose in its might. Governors Seymour, of New York, Andrew, of Massachusetts, and Curtin, of Pennsylvania, put their whole militia at the service of the President; the energy at Washington, momentarily paralyzed, soon recovered; and by the last day of the month, Meade had collected an army of near 200,000 men. Many of these were, of course, new levies and raw militia; but near one-half were
urthouse, Virginia, May 13, 1861. First blood of the war. Naturally, many conflicting statements as to the last effective shot of the long struggle were made and received as true. The most reliable would appear to be the followingt reproduced from a paper printed by the boys of Mr. Denson's school, in the village of Pittsboro, N. C., in 1866: The accomplished author of that series of interesting papers, The last ninety days of the war in North Carolina, published in The Watchman, New York, states that the last blood of the war was shed near the Atkins plantation, a few miles from Chapel Hill, on the 14th April, 1865. In a later number of the same paper, a member of the First Tennessee Cavalry says that it is a mistake; that companies F1 and F2 of the same regiment to which he belonged, skirmished sharply with the Federals on the 15th, and claims that this was the last blood shed. Both are in error: there was a skirmish near Mt. Zion church, two miles south-east of Pittsboro
Zollicoffer (search for this): chapter 20
Chapter 19: days of depression. Reverses on all lines Zollicoffer's death Mr. Benjamin, Secretary of war transportation dangers the Tennessee river forts Forrest, and Morgan gloom follows Nashville's fall Government blamed by people the permanent Government Mr. Davis' typical inaugural its effect and its Sequence Cabinet changes. The proverb that misfortunes never come singly soon became a painful verity in the South; and a terrible reaction began to still the high-beatingth stunning effect; opening wide the eyes of the whole country to the condition in which apathy, or mismanagement, had left it. As usual, too, in the popular estimate of a success, or a reverse, the public laid much stress on the death of Zollicoffer, who was a favorite both with them and the army. He was declared uselessly sacrificed, and his commanding general and the Government came in for an equal share of popular condemnation. Mr. Davis soon afterward relieved Secretary Walker fr
... 153 154 155 156 157 158