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J. B. Jones, A Rebel War Clerk's Diary 4 4 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 11. (ed. Frank Moore) 4 4 Browse Search
Comte de Paris, History of the Civil War in America. Vol. 2. (ed. Henry Coppee , LL.D.) 4 4 Browse Search
Maj. Jed. Hotchkiss, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 3, Virginia (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 4 4 Browse Search
John D. Billings, The history of the Tenth Massachusetts battery of light artillery in the war of the rebellion 3 3 Browse Search
Horace Greeley, The American Conflict: A History of the Great Rebellion in the United States of America, 1860-65: its Causes, Incidents, and Results: Intended to exhibit especially its moral and political phases with the drift and progress of American opinion respecting human slavery from 1776 to the close of the War for the Union. Volume I. 3 3 Browse Search
Col. O. M. Roberts, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 12.1, Alabama (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 3 3 Browse Search
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Massachusetts in the Army and Navy during the war of 1861-1865, vol. 1, Condensed history of regiments. 3 3 Browse Search
William Schouler, A history of Massachusetts in the Civil War: Volume 1 3 3 Browse Search
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War: Volume 2. 2 2 Browse Search
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J. B. Jones, A Rebel War Clerk's Diary, XXIX. August, 1863 (search)
rt with the last of her little store of gold, to buy a few articles of furniture at auction, and save a heavy expense ($40 per monthh, the same Evans came to me, saying that although he had no money from my agent, if I would give him an order on the agent for $300, he would advance that amount in Treasury notes. I accepted the sum on his conditions. This is the work of a beneficent Providence, thus manifested on three different occasions,--and to doubt it would be to deserve damnation! August 8 There is nothing new from any of the armies, except that my old friend, Gen. Rains, sent to Mississippi, stopped and stampeded Grant's army, after Johnston retreated from Jackson, with his subterra batteries. It appears that hundreds of the enemy and their horses were killed and wounded by the shells planted by him beneath the surface of the earth, and which ignited under the pressure of their weight. They knew not where to go to avoid them, and so they retreated to Vicksburg. This in
J. B. Jones, A Rebel War Clerk's Diary, chapter 42 (search)
rough the city last night, via the Central and Fredericksburg Railroads, and this morning Fitzhugh Lee's cavalry corps is passing in the same direction-9 A. M. All this indicates a transferrence of the scene of operations nearer the enemy's country — the relief of Richmond — the failure of Grant's mad Bull campaign, prompted by President Lincoln, who is no general. Honor to Lee!-the savior of his country! and the noble band of heroes whom he has led to victory!-but first to God. August 8 Hot and dry. There are rumors of battles near Winchester and in Georgia. Mr. Benjamin writes the Secretary of War for a passport for --, who is going to New York, for our service. In the assault on the fortifications near Petersburg last week, it is said Hancock's (enemy's) corps lost half its men. Watermelons have sold at $20 each; corn, $10 per dozen ears; and everything else in the markets in proportion. My yellow tomatoes are just maturing. The dry weather has rui
The Atlanta (Georgia) Campaign: May 1 - September 8, 1864., Part I: General Report. (ed. Maj. George B. Davis, Mr. Leslie J. Perry, Mr. Joseph W. Kirkley), Report of Lieut. Gen. Ulysses S. Grant, U. S. Army, commanding armies of the United States, of operations march, 1864-May, 1865. (search)
. Before starting General A. J. Smith's troops back to Sherman, General Canby sent a part of it to disperse a force of the enemy that was collecting near the Mississippi River. General Smith met and defeated this force near Lake Chicot on the 5th of June. Our loss was about 40 killed and 70 wounded. In the latter part of July General Canby sent Maj. Gen. Gordon Granger, with such forces as he could collect, to co-operate with Admiral Farragut against the defenses of Mobile Bay. On the 8th of August Fort Gaines surrendered to the combined naval and land forces. Fort Powell was blown up and abandoned. On the 9th Fort Morgan was invested, and after a severe bombardment surrendered on the 23d. The total captures amounted to 1,464 prisoners and 104 pieces of artillery. Subordinate reports of operations against Mobile will appear in Vol. XXXIX. About the last of August, it being reported that the rebel General Price, with a force of about 10,000 men, had reached Jacksonport, on
The Atlanta (Georgia) Campaign: May 1 - September 8, 1864., Part I: General Report. (ed. Maj. George B. Davis, Mr. Leslie J. Perry, Mr. Joseph W. Kirkley), chapter 10 (search)
ther a few yards in his rear. The general understanding this perfectly always told me that he did not wish anything of the kind done, that he intended to gain possession of Atlanta by operating upon the enemy's lines of communication, until he either brought on a general engagement, in which event he expected to gain a decisive victory, or compel the enemy to evacuate the city, which he could easily do, as the place was not, and it was evident that it could not be, completely invested. August 8 and 9, was at work everywhere strengthening our lines. Commenced the construction of batteries for 4 1/2-inch guns which had been ordered. These were placed in position as follows: Two in front of the Twentieth Army Corps, near the Chattanooga railroad, and two others in front of the Sixteenth Corps. The whole of the Army of the Tennessee advanced about three-eighths of a mile in the manner already described, and the lines of the Army of the Cumberland were straightened, so the whole lin
The Atlanta (Georgia) Campaign: May 1 - September 8, 1864., Part I: General Report. (ed. Maj. George B. Davis, Mr. Leslie J. Perry, Mr. Joseph W. Kirkley), chapter 20 (search)
23, 24, 25, and 26, occupied same position, building works and skirmishing. July 27, at 9 p. m. moved to left flank of army and occupied enemy's old works. July 28, 29, 30, and 31, occupied same position. August 1 in the evening relieved one brigade of General Hascall's division on the front line. August 2, occupied same position. August 3, made demonstration with skirmish line; lost 8 men wounded. August 4. same position. August 5, made demonstration with skirmish line. August 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, and 11, all quiet. August 12, advanced skirmish line 300 or 400 yards, met very little resistance, and returned to old position. August 13, 14, and 15, occupied same position. August 16, shifted position to the left, the length of the brigade. August 17 and 18, all quiet. August 19, put the brigade in position on the Augusta railroad to the left of picket-line, deployed Ninetieth Ohio, One hundred and first Ohio, and Twenty-first Illinois as skirmishers and advanced onehalf mile,
The Atlanta (Georgia) Campaign: May 1 - September 8, 1864., Part I: General Report. (ed. Maj. George B. Davis, Mr. Leslie J. Perry, Mr. Joseph W. Kirkley), chapter 32 (search)
ngs remained unchanged in our front. August 1 and 2, nothing of importance occurred on our front during the last two days. August 3, our skirmish line was advanced this afternoon, charging that of the enemy and capturing 30 prisoners, but they massed their forces and compelled ours to fall back. Our loss slight. August 4, all quiet in our front to-day. August 5, skirmishers advanced and tried to drive in or capture the rebel skirmish line, but failed. No loss in regiment. August 6, 7, 8, 9, and 10, all quiet in our front during these days. August 11, demonstration made on the picket-line by firing from rifle-pits; otherwise all quiet during the day. August 12 and 13, all quiet except occasional artillery firing. August 14, very heavy cannonading all night on our lines, the enemy replying but little. August 15 and 16, all quiet in our front. August 17, lines were extended to the left; the right did not move. A foraging party went out from the regiment and 2 of its members
The Atlanta (Georgia) Campaign: May 1 - September 8, 1864., Part I: General Report. (ed. Maj. George B. Davis, Mr. Leslie J. Perry, Mr. Joseph W. Kirkley), chapter 38 (search)
of the infantry forces and but a few rods from the Howard house. The First Brigade of First Division was to my right and Colonel Minty's brigade of cavalry to my left. My pickets occupied the old works, where the Fifteenth Corps fought in the engagement of the 22d of July. At 5 ). m. August 6 I was ordered to make a demonstration toward Atlanta, with a re-enforced skirmish line. The demonstration was continued till dusk, when the original status was resumed without casualty. August 7, 8, 9, 10, and 11, nothing but the ordinary picket duty was required of this brigade. 12th, at 11 a. m. made a reconnaissance to the front with two of my regiments and two of the First Division. Drove back the rebel pickets and got a good view of their main works on the Decatur road. Lost 1 man killed. Returned by 2 p. m. 13th and 14th, all quiet in my command. 15th, the cavalry left and my lines were extended to the left. 16th, at 8.20 p. m. received orders to move a thousand yards to the
The Atlanta (Georgia) Campaign: May 1 - September 8, 1864., Part I: General Report. (ed. Maj. George B. Davis, Mr. Leslie J. Perry, Mr. Joseph W. Kirkley), chapter 98 (search)
the enemy had not evacuated the place. A heavy skirmish occurred in which we lost 1 officer and 2 men killed, and 1 officer and 5 men wounded, while advancing the skirmish line to the suburbs. From this time to the close of July comparative quiet prevailed and no casualties occurred. August 1, heavy skirmishing all day but no casualties. August 2, 2 men wounded. August 7, the command charged the rebel lines, capturing their riflepits; lost 1 killed, I severely and 1 mortally wounded. August 8, still skirmishing; 3 men wounded. August 9, 1 man mortally and 1 slightly wounded by sharpshooters. During the period between the latter date and our arrival at Jonesborough, with the exception of one or two light skirmishes with the loss of 3 men wounded, nothing important occurred. It is but justice to say that owing to my absence on account of sickness the regiment was under the command of Captain Masters from the 3d to the 22d of July, when he was severely wounded, and the command f
The Atlanta (Georgia) Campaign: May 1 - September 8, 1864., Part I: General Report. (ed. Maj. George B. Davis, Mr. Leslie J. Perry, Mr. Joseph W. Kirkley), chapter 101 (search)
thick wood of timber and underbrush, where we came upon him in his works, quietly waiting an attack. The line was halted. After some time, orders were received to retire, which was done in good order. Went back and camped in open field, by General Baird's headquarters; loss, 1 wounded. August 6, crossed creek at mill and moved up toward works. Was not in line. In evening moved out and constructed works. August 7, remained in works. Major Barger was severely wounded by a stray shot. August 8, moved in the evening and constructed works in the interval between the left of the Forty-second Indiana and the right of the Fifteenth Corps. August 9, drove the enemy at daylight from his skirmish works on our front; lost 1 killed and 5 wounded. August 10, the regiment was sorely annoyed by the enemy's sharpshooters and a battery of artillery posted on a hill to the right of our front; loss, I killed, 2 wounded. August 11, nothing further occurred than some skirmishing. August 12, the
The Atlanta (Georgia) Campaign: May 1 - September 8, 1864., Part I: General Report. (ed. Maj. George B. Davis, Mr. Leslie J. Perry, Mr. Joseph W. Kirkley), chapter 112 (search)
The detachment lost in killed and wounded 25 per cent. of its effective force. Three first sergeants (old and tried soldiers) were wounded, viz, Charles A. Patterson, Company G, First Battalion; Benjamin R. Elrick, Company H, Second Battalion, and Charles M, Stacks, Company H, Third Battalion. The detachment in this affair captured prisoners greater in number than its own strength, taking several companies entire with their officers and while in the act of re-enforcing their lines. From August 8 to August 25 the detachment occupied the line captured on the 7th and the old first line of our works. During that time (on the 19th and 20th) we marched twice to the right of our army and back, acting as support to the Twenty-third Army Corps in movements made by said corps. August 26, at night withdrew from our line (in connection with the Army of the Cumberland), thus commencing that brilliant flank movement which ended in the decisive victory of Jonesborough and resulted in the captu
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