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Francis Jackson Garrison, William Lloyd Garrison, 1805-1879; the story of his life told by his children: volume 3 4 4 Browse Search
Horace Greeley, The American Conflict: A History of the Great Rebellion in the United States of America, 1860-65: its Causes, Incidents, and Results: Intended to exhibit especially its moral and political phases with the drift and progress of American opinion respecting human slavery from 1776 to the close of the War for the Union. Volume II. 4 4 Browse Search
John D. Billings, The history of the Tenth Massachusetts battery of light artillery in the war of the rebellion 4 4 Browse Search
George Bancroft, History of the United States from the Discovery of the American Continent, Vol. 10 4 4 Browse Search
The Photographic History of The Civil War: in ten volumes, Thousands of Scenes Photographed 1861-65, with Text by many Special Authorities, Volume 2: Two Years of Grim War. (ed. Francis Trevelyan Miller) 4 4 Browse Search
J. B. Jones, A Rebel War Clerk's Diary 4 4 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events, Diary from December 17, 1860 - April 30, 1864 (ed. Frank Moore) 4 4 Browse Search
Edward L. Pierce, Memoir and letters of Charles Sumner: volume 3 4 4 Browse Search
Benson J. Lossing, Pictorial Field Book of the Civil War. Volume 3. 3 3 Browse Search
Edward L. Pierce, Memoir and letters of Charles Sumner: volume 4 3 3 Browse Search
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rces in toward Rock-fish Gap. This enabled me to re-establish Merritt at Port Republic, send the Sixth and Nineteenth corps to the neighborhood of Mt. Crawford to await the return of Torbert, and to post Crook at Harrisonburg; these dispositions practically obtained till the 6th of October, I holding a line across the valley from Port Republic along North River by Mt. Crawford to the Back road near the mouth of Briery Branch Gap. It was during this period, about dusk on the evening of October 3, that between Harrisonburg and Dayton my engineer officer, Lieutenant John R. Meigs, was murdered within my lines. He had gone out with two topographical assistants to plot the country, and late in the evening, while riding along the public road on his return to camp, he overtook three men dressed in our uniform. From their dress, and also because the party was immediately behind our lines and within a mile and a half of my headquarters, Meigs and his assistants naturally thought that th
t hundred bushels of wheat, near five hundred bushels of oats, and seventy-five barrels of fish; all of which was stored in the commissary's depot at Alexandria.--National Intelligencer, Oct. 1. At Cumberland, Md., a Union meeting was held. Speeches were delivered by Messrs. Bradford and Maffit. The wickedness of the rebellion was portrayed in its true colors; and the deceitfulness of secession under the hypocritical guise of a peace party, was fully exposed. --Cumberland Civilian, October 3. The Fourth regiment of New Hampshire Volunteers, under the command of Colonel Thomas J. Whipple, passed through Jersey City, N. J., en route to Washington. The regiment is well provided with all the necessaries peculiar to the movable soldier, and has twenty-two baggage-wagons, one ambulance, one hospital, and ninety-five horses, which are provided entirely for accommodation and comfort. It numbers one thousand men, who are armed with the Enfield rifle. Colonel Whipple is well k
October 3. The Memphis Argus of to-day contains the following proclamation by Thomas O. Moore, Governor of Louisiana: Concurring entirely in the views expressed by the cotton factors of New Orleans, in the annexed communication and petition from business men here, praying that no cotton be sent to New Orleans during the existence of the blockade, I have determined to take the most decided means to prevent the landing of any cotton in this city. Notice is therefore hereby given to all masters and owners of steamboats and other water-craft, that from and after the 10th of October no cotton must be brought to New Orleans, or within the lines embracing that section of the country between the fortifications above Carrollton and those below the city, and extending back to the lake. All steamboats or other water-craft arriving within the prescribed limits, will be forthwith placed in charge of an armed force, and escorted above the point indicated. This course will be ado
October 3. The rebel General Bragg issued an order from his headquarters at Lexington, Ky., ordering that the paper currency of the confederate States should be taken at its par value in all transactions whatever, public or private. The order also stated that the refusal to take it, or the exaction of exorbitant prices, would be treated as a military offence, and punished accordingly. The advance brigade of Gen. Geo. W. Morgan's command, from Cumberland Gap, reached Greenupsburgh, Ky., after a march of sixteen days. Many of them were hatless, shoeless, and naked. They had marched twenty miles a day, skirmishing with the rebels as they advanced. Clement C. Clay, Senator from Alabama, submitted the following preamble and resolution in the rebel Congress in session at Richmond, Va.: Whereas, It is notorious that many and most flagrant acts violative of the usages of war, of the rights of humanity and even of common decency, have been, and still are being, perpetrate
October 3. McMinnville, Tenn., was captured by the rebels under General Wheeler. Major Patterson, who was taken prisoner with a portion of the Fourth Tennessee infantry, relates the following history of the capture: He had with him seven companies, mostly fragments. On the second instant he sent out scouts, who returned and reported no enemy. On the next day he sent Lieutenant Farnsworth with twenty scouts, who were cut off. He then sent out Lieutenant Allen, who passed the pickets a quarter of a mile and returned, reporting the rebels in force. Major Patterson drew up his command, four hundred and four in all, and fifty convalescents from the hospital. Skirmishing followed for an hour and a quarter, during which the rebels were repulsed in three charges. Wheeler then sent in a flag of truce, with a verbal demand for a surrender, which Major Patterson refused, saying he would not surrender until he was compelled to do so. In half an hour Colonel Hodge of the Kentucky briga
upply and ammunition train, which the enemy had captured and burned. The explosion of shells in the burning train sounded like artillery. We camped that night on the mountain — a spur of the Cumberland — on a road running parallel with and between two roads, on which the divided column of the enemy was moving. Our advance camp, the Second brigade, was within two and a half miles of the main rebel, camp, yet there was no collision — even of pickets. A march of twenty miles next day, October third, without once halting, during which a battalion of the Fourth Ohio rejoined the brigade, brought the advance to the Gap in the western slope, where they met with stubborn resistance; but the First brigade forced a passage down the mountain. The rear of the column descended after night, and the fires of a large rebel camp were visible. Once down, Minty had to fight for forage and water. We were in a small space without either. This could not long remain so; the command must have water<
ho dwelleth in the heavens, and I recommend too that while offering up the ascriptions justly due to him for such singular deliverances and blessings, they do also, with humble penitence for our national perverseness and disobedience, commend to his tender care all those who have become widows, orphans, mourners, or sufferers in the lamentable civil strife in which we are unavoidably engaged, and fervently implore the interposition of the Almighty hand to heal the wounds of the nation, and to restore it, as soon as may be consistent with divine purposes, to the full enjoyment of peace, harmony, tranquillity, and union. In testimony whereof, I have hereunto set my hand and caused the seal of the United States to be affixed. Done at the city of Washington, this third day of October, in the year of our Lord one thousand eight hundred and sixty-three, and of the Independence of the United States the eighty-eighth. Abraham Lincoln. By the President. W. H. Seward, Secretary of State.
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War: Volume 2., Iuka and Corinth. (search)
ttle of Corinth, Miss., which is often confounded in public memory with our advance, under Halleck, from Pittsburg Landing in April and May, 1862, was fought on the 3d and 4th of October, of that year, between the combined forces of Generals Earl Van Dorn and Sterling Price of the Confederacy, and the Union divisions of Generals Dred Stanley to move in close to town near the middle line of works, called the Halleck line, and to wait for further developments. An order dated 1:30 A. M., October 3d, had set all the troops in motion. The impression that the enemy might find it better to strike a point on our line of communication and compel us to get out omainly in reserve on the extreme left, looking toward the Kossuth road. Thus in front of those wooded western approaches, the Union troops, on the morning of October 3d, waited for what might happen, wholly ignorant of what Van Dorn was doing at Chewalla, ten miles away through thick forests. Of this General Van Dorn says:
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War: Volume 2., The battle of Corinth. (search)
ttle of Corinth, Miss., which is often confounded in public memory with our advance, under Halleck, from Pittsburg Landing in April and May, 1862, was fought on the 3d and 4th of October, of that year, between the combined forces of Generals Earl Van Dorn and Sterling Price of the Confederacy, and the Union divisions of Generals Dred Stanley to move in close to town near the middle line of works, called the Halleck line, and to wait for further developments. An order dated 1:30 A. M., October 3d, had set all the troops in motion. The impression that the enemy might find it better to strike a point on our line of communication and compel us to get out omainly in reserve on the extreme left, looking toward the Kossuth road. Thus in front of those wooded western approaches, the Union troops, on the morning of October 3d, waited for what might happen, wholly ignorant of what Van Dorn was doing at Chewalla, ten miles away through thick forests. Of this General Van Dorn says:
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 3., Bragg's invasion of Kentucky. (search)
reached the suburbs of Covington, but his instructions were not to make an attack upon the city. Smith used vigorous efforts to gather and concentrate supplies, arouse the people, and raise and organize troops for the Confederacy. General George W. Morgan (Federal), who was left at Cumberland Gap with 8682 men, seeing these active movements in his rear, evacuated that position on September 17th and made his way through eastern Kentucky to the Ohio River at Greenupsburg, arriving there October 3d. While these events were happening, Bragg had organized his army at Chattanooga into two wings. The right, commanded by General Polk, consisted of Cheatham's and Withers's divisions of infantry and Colonel Lay's brigade of cavalry. The left wing, commanded by General Hardee, consisted of Buckner's and Anderson's divisions of infantry and Wheeler's brigade of cavalry. This entire force, on August 27th, reported 27,816 officers and men for duty. This return reports a total of 431 of
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