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Titus Livius (Livy), Ab Urbe Condita, books 23-25 (ed. Frank Gardener Moore, Professor Emeritus in Columbia University) 1 1 Browse Search
Titus Livius (Livy), Ab Urbe Condita, books 8-10 (ed. Benjamin Oliver Foster, Ph.D.) 1 1 Browse Search
Polybius, Histories 1 1 Browse Search
Appian, The Foreign Wars (ed. Horace White) 1 1 Browse Search
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J. B. Greenough, G. L. Kittredge, Select Orations of Cicero, Allen and Greenough's Edition., section 60 (search)
at enim: see first note on sect. 51. exempla, precedents; instituta, established customs. non dicam, etc.: an excellent specimen of the rhetorical device known as praeteritio (cf. note on p. 88, l. 13, above). paruisse, adcommodasse, i.e. they disregarded precedents in great emergencies. temporum depends on casus, consiliorum on rationes (chiastic order). ab uno imperatore: Scipio Africanus the younger (Aemilianus), who captured Carthage (B.C. 146) and Numantia (B.C. 133). In his time there had been a law that no person should be consul twice in successlon. ut . . . poneretur: clause of purpose with visum est (here a verb of decreeing). C. Mario: Marius was chosen consul five years in succession, to carry on the wars here referred to.
J. B. Greenough, G. L. Kittredge, Select Orations of Cicero , Allen and Greenough's Edition., chapter 1 (search)
both to interfecit and perferemus; in English we should connect the two clauses by and. On the force of an, see § 335, b (211, b); B. 162, 4, a; G. 457, 1 ; H. 380, 3 (353, N.4); H.-B. 236. vir amplissimus, pontifex maximus: observe how these words strengthen the force of the example. Ti. Gracchium: Tiberius Sempronius Gracchus, a young man of high rank and great purity of character, attempted to carry through some important reforms, particularly touching the tenure of the public lands, B.C. 133. Requiring more time to make his legislation effective, he attempted illegally to secure his own re-election as tribune, when he was attacked and killed by a mob of Senators headed by P. Scipio Nasica. privatus: at the time referred to, Nasica was only a private citizen of consular rank. He afterwards went into exile, and was made Pontifex Maximus in his absence. The word privatus is rhetorically opposed to nos consules. illa, that case, plural for singular as referring to the circums
J. B. Greenough, G. L. Kittredge, Select Orations of Cicero , Allen and Greenough's Edition., chapter 10 (search)
B. 209, I; G. 377; 11.457(409, iii); H-B. 352, I. gesta: abl. abs. with re publica. Scipio: the elder Africanus, who brought the Second Punic War to a triumphant close by the battle of Zama, B.C. 202. By "carrying the war into Africa," he forced Hannibal to retire from Italy. alter Africanus: the younger, surnamed Aemilianus. He was the son of L. Aemilius Paulus (mentioned below), and adopted by the son of the elder Africanus. He captured Carthage, B.C. 146, and Numantia, in Spain, B.C. 133. Paulus: father of the younger Africanus, and, like his son, the most eminent and upright man of his generation. He brought the Third Macedonian War to a close by the battle of Pydna, B.C. 168, and led King Perseus captive in his triumphal procession. currum [triumphalem]: the captives did not go with or behind the triumphal chariot, but preceded it in the procession. bis liberavit: by the victories over the German invaders, —over the Teutones at Aquae Sextiae (B.C. 102), and the Cimb
J. B. Greenough, G. L. Kittredge, Select Orations of Cicero, Allen and Greenough's Edition., section 5 (search)
tunc, at that time. This was the long period of comparative quiet between the Gracchan disturbances (B.C. 133-121) and the tribunate of Drusus (B.C. 91), which was followed by the Social War and the civil wars of Marius and Sulla. Latio: not the geographical Latium merely, but all towns which at that time possessed Latin citizenship; that is, the Latin colonies, such as Venusia, the birthplace of the poet Horace. de ingeniis, i.e. could form some opinion about the talents of literary men. absentibus, people at a distance. Mario et Catulo (coss. B.C. 102); of these, Marius was renowned for his exploits, while Catulus was a good officer, and also a man of culture. nactus est, etc., he happened to find holding the consulship. eos, quorum alter, men of such a kind that one of them, etc. This would not only furnish him with themes for his poetry but insure appreciation of his genius. Luculli: Lucius, the one who fought against Mithridates, and his brother Marcus; both of them
Frank Frost Abbott, Commentary on Selected Letters of Cicero, Letter LXXXIX: ad familiares 7.22 (search)
Letter LXXXIX: ad familiares 7.22 Tusculum (?), June, (?) 44 B.C. possetne heres, etc., whether an heir could properly bring action for a theft committed before (he became the heir). furti: the genitive to indicate the charge. bene potus: cf. Intr. 90. id caput, that chapter or section; so quoddam caput legis, Att. 3.15.6. Sex. Aelium (Paetum) : consul in 198 B.C. , an authority upon jurisprudence and civil law, often mentioned by Cicero, e.g. Brut. 78; Tusc. Disp. 1.18. His name is coupled with that of Manilius in de Or. 1.212 also. M'. Manilium: cf. Ep. XXV.2n. M. Brutum: Marcus Junius Brutus: an authority on civil law, upon which subject he composed three books. Scaevolae: consul in 133 B.C. , and frequently quoted by Cicero as a legal authority. Testae: i.e. Trebatius.
A Dictionary of Greek and Roman biography and mythology (ed. William Smith), or Anti'ochus Sidetes (search)
e was brought up, (and not from a Syriac word signifying a hunter,) and on coins Euergetes (*Eu)erge/ths), was the younger son of Demetrius Soter, and obtained possession of the throne in B. C. 137, after conquering Tryphon, who had held the sovereignty since the murder of Antiochus VI. He married Cleopatra, the wife of his elder brother Demetrius Nicator, who was a prisoner in the hand of the Parthians. He carried on war against the Jews, and took Jerusalem after almost a year's siege, in B. C. 133. He then granted them a peace on favourable terms, and next directed his arms against the Parthians. At first he met with success, but was afterwards defeated by the Parthian king, and lost his life in the battle, after a reign of nine years. (B. C. 128.) His son Seleucus was taken prisoner in the same battle. Antiochus, like many of his predecessors, was passionately devoted to the pleasures of the table. He had three sons and two daughters, the latter of whom both bore the name of Laodic
Aristoni'cus 2. A natural son of Eumenes II. of Pergamus, who was succeeded by Attalus III. When the latter died in B. C. 133, and made over his kingdom to the Romans, Aristonicus claimed his father's kingdom as his lawful inheritance. The towns, for fear of the Romans, refused to recognise him, but he compelled them by force of arms; and at last there seemed no doubt of his ultimate success. In B. C. 131, the consul P. Licinius Crassus, who received Asia as his province, marched against him; but he was more intent upon making booty than on combating his enemy, and in an ill-organized battle which was fought about the end of the year, his army was defeated, and he himself made prisoner by Aristonicus. In the year following, B. C. 130, the consul M. Perperna, who succeeded Crassus, acted with more energy, and in the very first engagement conquered Aristonicus and took him prisoner. After the death of Perperna, M. Aquillius completed the conquest of the kingdom of Pergamus, B. C. 129.
A Dictionary of Greek and Roman biography and mythology (ed. William Smith), (search)
Ase'llio, P. Sempro'nius was tribune of the soldiers under P. Scipio Africanus at Numantia, B. C. 133, and wrote a history of the affairs in which he had been engaged. (Gel. 2.13.) His work appears to have commenced with the Punic wars, and it contained a very full account of the times of the Gracchi. The exact title of the work, and the number of books into which it was divided, are not known. From the great superiority which Asellio assigns to history above annals (apud Gell. 5.18), it is pretty certain that his own work was not in the form of annals. It is sometimes cited by the name of libri rerum gestarunm, and sometimes by that of historiae; and it contained at least fourteen books. (Gel. 13.3, 21; Charis. ii. p. 195.) It is cited also in Gel. 1.13, 4.9, 13.3, 21; Priscian, v. p. 668; Serv. ad Virg. Aen. 12.121; Nonius, s. v. gliseitur. Cicero speaks (de Leg. 1.2) slightingly of Asellio. P. Sempronius Asellio should be carefully distinguished from C. Sempronius Tuditanus, wit
LOMETOR, was the son of Eumenes II. and Stratonice, daughter of Ariarathes, king of Cappadocia. While yet a boy, he was brought to Rome (B. C. 152), and presented to the senate at the same time with Alexander Balas. He succeeded his uncle Attalus II. B. C. 138. He is known to us chiefly for the extravagance of his conduct and the murder of his relations and friends. At last, seized with remorse, he abandoned all public business, and devoted himself to sculpture, statuary, and gardening, on which he wrote a work. He died B. C. 133 of a fever, with which he was seized in consequence of exposing himself to the sun's rays while engaged in erecting a monument to his mother. In his will, he made the Romans his heirs. (Strab. xiii. p.624; Plb. 33.16; Just. 36.14; Diod. xxxiv. Exc. p. 601; Varro, R. R. Praef.; Columell. 1.1.8; Plin. Nat. 18.5; Liv. Epit. 58; Plut. TG 14; Vell. 2.4; Florus, 2.20; Appian. Mithr. 62, Bell. Civ. 5.4.) His kingdom was claimed by Aristonicus. [ARISTONICUS.] [C.P.M]
med PHILOMETOR, was the son of Eumenes II. and Stratonice, daughter of Ariarathes, king of Cappadocia. While yet a boy, he was brought to Rome (B. C. 152), and presented to the senate at the same time with Alexander Balas. He succeeded his uncle Attalus II. B. C. 138. He is known to us chiefly for the extravagance of his conduct and the murder of his relations and friends. At last, seized with remorse, he abandoned all public business, and devoted himself to sculpture, statuary, and gardening, on which he wrote a work. He died B. C. 133 of a fever, with which he was seized in consequence of exposing himself to the sun's rays while engaged in erecting a monument to his mother. In his will, he made the Romans his heirs. (Strab. xiii. p.624; Plb. 33.16; Just. 36.14; Diod. xxxiv. Exc. p. 601; Varro, R. R. Praef.; Columell. 1.1.8; Plin. Nat. 18.5; Liv. Epit. 58; Plut. TG 14; Vell. 2.4; Florus, 2.20; Appian. Mithr. 62, Bell. Civ. 5.4.) His kingdom was claimed by Aristonicus. [ARISTONICUS.]
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