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Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Dudley, Thomas, 1576-1653 (search)
Dudley, Thomas, 1576-1653 Colonial governor; born in Northampton, England, in 1576; was an officer of Queen Elizabeth, serving in Holland; and afterwards he became a Puritan, and retrieved the fortunes of the Earl of Lincoln by a faithful care of his estate as his steward. He came to Boston in 1630, as deputy governor, with his son-in-law, Simon Bradstreet, and held the office ten years. He was appointed major-general of the colony in 1644. He died in Roxbury, Mass., July 31, 1653. Dudley, Thomas, 1576-1653 Colonial governor; born in Northampton, England, in 1576; was an officer of Queen Elizabeth, serving in Holland; and afterwards he became a Puritan, and retrieved the fortunes of the Earl of Lincoln by a faithful care of his estate as his steward. He came to Boston in 1630, as deputy governor, with his son-in-law, Simon Bradstreet, and held the office ten years. He was appointed major-general of the colony in 1644. He died in Roxbury, Mass., July 31, 1653.
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Gilbert, Sir Humphrey 1539- (search)
er Raleigh. Finishing his studies at Eton and Oxford, he entered upon the military profession; and being successful in suppressing a rebellion in Ireland in 1570, he was made commander-in-chief and governor of Munster, and was knighted by the lorddeputy. Returning to England soon after wards, he married a rich heiress. In Sir Humphrey Gilbert. 1572 he commanded a squadron of nine ships to reinforce an armament intended for the recovery of Flushing; and soon after his return he published (1576) a Discourse of a discoverie for a New Pas-Sage to Cathaia and the East Indies. He obtained letters-patent from Queen Elizabeth, dated June 11, 1578, empowering him to discover and possess any lands in North America then unsettled, he to pay to the crown one-fifth of all gold and silver which the countries he might discover and colonize should produce. It invested him with powers of an absolute ruler over his colony, provided the laws should not be in derogation of supreme allegiance to th
into the vat of melted tallow. See candle. 2. (Dyeing.) A frame on which the fabric is stretched and immersed in dyeing with indigo. Dipping-needle. Dip′ping-nee′dle. The inclination or dip of the magnetized needle was not known to the Chinese, who had discovered its variation during the twelfth century. This element of terrestrial magnetism appears to have been discovered by Robert Norman, a compass-maker of Ratcliff, London, who detected the dip and published the fact in 1576. He contrived the dipping-needle, and found the dip at London to be 71° 50′. See also dip-circle. Captain Sir James Ross, the celebrated Arctic navigator, reached the magnetic pole, latitude 70° 5′ 17″ north, and longitude 96° 46′ 45″ west, on the 1st of June, 1831. The amount of dip was 89° 59′. Horizontal needles refused to work, showing no sensitiveness. He erected a cairn of limestone rocks, inclosing a tin case containing the record. The cairn may remain, unless the
verer was nearly brought to an abrupt conclusion by the discovery of this error. See mariner's compass. The dip of the magnet was discovered by Robert Norman, 1576. See magnetometer. The magnet worn by Sir Isaac Newton in his ring weighed only 3 grains, yet was able to take up 746 grains, or nearly 250 times its own weig balance when touched by the loadstone. Robert Norman of London, a maker of compasses, was the first, so far as we know, to detect the dip and publish the fact; 1576. He contrived the dipping-needle, suspended on a horizontal axis, and found the dip at London to be 71° 50′. Robert Halley, in 1700, published a chart, having 10 B. C. The gimbal-joint and compass-box were invented by the Rev. William Barlowe in 1608. The dip of the needle was discovered by Robert Norman of London, 1576; the diurnal variation, by Graham, a London watchmaker, in 1722. An azimuth compass is one used at sea for finding the horizonal distance of the sun or a star f
. 0362,73450364,862 10362,84360365,454 20363,15870365,937 30363,64180366,252 40364,23390366,361 The length of the degrees of longitude at every tenth degree is as follows: — Latitude.Length of degree of longitude in English feetLatitude.Length of degree of longitude in English feet. 0365,16250235,171 10359,64060183,629 20343,26370125,254 30316,4938063,612 40280,106900 Odometers were possessed by Augustus, the Elector of Saxony, A. D. 1553-86, and for Emperor Rodolphus II. 1576-1612. In the eighteenth century they became common, and descriptions are found in scientific reports and works of that date. Hohlfield, born at Hennerndorf, in Saxony, in 1711, seems to have much improved the instrument. A new French instrument, termed a compteur mecanique, or calculating-machine, not only reckons the distance traversed, but indicates as well the exact sum of money due to the driver. Two dials are fixed on the back of the driving-seat; one contains a clock, while on
in other places. All the present modes of using the tobacco plant originated in America. a. Columbus noticed that the natives of the West India islands used the leaves in rolls, — cigars. The Aztecs had cigar tubes, and also used nostril tubes of tortoise-shell for inhaling the smoke. The Mexicans and North American Indians used pipes. Ovideo speaks in 1426 of the inhaling of the smoke through the forked nostril tube by the Indians of Hispaniola. Lobel, in his History of plants, 1576, gives an engraving of a rolled tube of tobacco (a cigar) as seen by Colon in the mouths of the natives of San Salvador. He describes it as a funnel of palm-leaf with a filling of tobacco leaves. The pipe is shown in the engravings to Be Bry, Historia Braziliana, 1590. b. Cortez found smoking the pipe to be an established custom in Mexico. Bernal Diaz relates that Montezuma had his pipe brought in great state by the ladies of his court after he had dined, and washed his mouth with scent
ough indeed from very imperfect observations, as early as 1530, or a century and a half before Halley. The movement of the magnetic lines, the first recognition of which is usually ascribed to Gassendi, was not even yet conjectured by William Gilbert; but at an earlier period Acosta, from the information of Portuguese navigators, assumed four lines of no declination upon the surface of the globe. Hardly had the inclinometer, or dipping-needle, been invented in England by Robert Norman, in 1576, than Gilbert boasted that by means of this instrument he could determine the position of a ship in a dark and starless night. Pope Alexander VI adopted the line of no variation discovered by Columbus 100 miles west of the Azores, as the easterly limit of the papal grant to the Spaniards, May, 1493. He was not aware, no blame to him, that the line was slowly moving east, and would soon be far removed from its first-observed position. It was reserved for a future age to show the incorrec
James Russell Lowell, Among my books, Spenser (search)
at a time when the business talent of the middle class was opening to it the door of prosperous preferment. In 1569 he was entered as a sizar at Pembroke Hall, Cambridge, and in due course took his bachelor's degree in 1573, and his master's in 1576. He is supposed, on insufficient grounds, as it appears to me, to have met with some disgust or disappointment during his residence at the University. This has been inferred from a passage in one of Gabriel Harvey's letters to him. But it woulhe friendship of Spenser. Yet the reiteration of emphasis with which he insists on all the world's knowing that Nash had called him an ass, probably gave Shakespeare the hint for one of the most comic touches in the character of Dogberry. Between 1576 and 1578 Spenser seems to have been with some of his kinsfolk in the North. It was during this interval that he conceived his fruitless passion for the Rosalinde, whose jilting him for another shepherd, whom he calls Menalcas, is somewhat perfunc
eet, which was to enter gulfs that none before him had visited. As they June 8. dropped down the Thames, Queen Elizabeth waved her hand in token of favor, and, by an honorable message, transmitted her approbation of an adventure which her own treasures had not contributed to advance During a storm on the voyage, the pinnace was swallowed up by the sea; the mariners in the Michael became terrified, and turned their prow home wards; but Frobisher, in a vessel not much surpassing Chap. III.} 1576. in tonnage the barge of a man-of-war, made his way. fearless and unattended, to the shores of Labrador. and to a passage or inlet north of the entrance of Hudson's Bay. A strange perversion has transferred the scene of his discoveries to the eastern coast of Greenland; Forster's Northern Voyages, 274—284; Hist. des Voyages, t. XV. 94—100. it was among a group of American islands, in the latitude of sixty-three degrees and eight minutes, that he entered what seemed to be a strait. Hope
secret favorer of Puritanism, he resented the imputation of lenity as a false accusation and malignant calumny of some incarnate, never-sleeping devil. It is true that the learned Grindal, who, during the reign of Mary, had lived in exile, and in 1576 was 1576. advanced to the see of Canterbury, was of a mild and gentle nature; and at the head of the English clergy, gave an example of reluctance to persecute. But having incurred the enmity of Elizabeth by his refusal to suppress the liberty o1576. advanced to the see of Canterbury, was of a mild and gentle nature; and at the head of the English clergy, gave an example of reluctance to persecute. But having incurred the enmity of Elizabeth by his refusal to suppress the liberty of prophesying, he was suspended, and when old and blind and broken-hearted, was ordered to resign. Nothing but his death in 1583, saved him from being superseded by Whitgift. 1583. The Puritans, as a body, had avoided a separation from the church. They had desired a reform, and not a schism. When, by espousing a party, a man puts a halter round his neck, and is thrust out from the career of public honor, the rash, the least cautious, and therefore, the least persevering, may sometimes be t
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