Your search returned 109 results in 59 document sections:

1 2 3 4 5 6
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), New Netherland. (search)
recall. The States-General had already peremptorily ordered the West Indian Company to take measures to relieve the people, but the corporation was bankrupt and powerless The immediate purpose of the Eight Men was gained, for Kieft was ordered to Holland, and Lubbertus Van Dincklagen, the former sheriff, was appointed provisional governor, until the commission of Peter Stuyvesant was issued in May, 1645. Uncas, the Mohegan sachem, always bent on mischief, spread a report, in the spring of 1653, that Ninegret, a Niantic sachem, uncle of Miantonomoh, had visited New Amsterdam during the preceding winter, and had arranged with the Dutch governor (Stuyvesant) a plot for a general insurrection of the natives and the murder of the New England settlers. The story caused such alarm (England had just declared war against Holland) that the commissioners of the New England confederacy assembled in special session at Boston in May. They sent messengers to Ninegret and Pessacus to inquire int
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Newman, Francis 1638-1660 (search)
Newman, Francis 1638-1660 Statesman; born in England; removed to New Hampshire in 1638; and later settled in New Haven, where he became secretary of Theophilus Eaton, the first governor of Connecticut. He was with the party sent to New Netherland on a visit to Gov. Peter Stuyvesant in 1653 for the purpose of securing an indemnity for the Dutch encroachments upon New Haven. In 1654-58 he was a commissioner of the consolidated colonies; and in 1658-60 was governor. He died in New Haven, Conn., Nov. 18, 1660.
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Ninegret, (search)
Ninegret, Chief of the Narraganset Indians, and uncle of Miantonomoh (q. v.). He aided the English in the Pequod War (1637). Because of a supposed plot between Ninegret and the Dutch, the commissioners or Congress of the New England Confederation deemed it advisable to make war upon him. They voted 250 footsoldiers (1653). The commissioners of Massachusetts did not agree with the others in the measure. Ninegret prosecuted a war with the Long Island Indians, who had placed themselves under the protection of the English. In September. 1654, the commissioners sent a message to Ninegret, demanding his appearance at Hartford, where they were convened, and the payment of a tribute long due for the Pequods under him. He refused to appear, and sent them a haughty answer. They therefore determined again to make war on him. They raised 270 infantry and forty horsemen. Maj. Simon Willard was appointed commander-in-chief of these forces, with instructions to proceed directly to Ninegret's
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Oneida Indians, (search)
—the Wolf, Bear, and Turtle—their tribal totem was a stone in a forked stick, and their name meant tribe of the granite rock. Tradition says that when the great confederacy was formed, Hiawatha said to them: You, Oneidas, a people who recline your bodies against the Everlasting Stone, that cannot be moved, shall be the second nation, because you give wise counsel. Very soon after the settlement of Canada they became involved in wars with the French and their Huron and Montagnais allies. In 1653 they joined their neighbors, the Onondagas, in a treaty of peace with the French, and received missionaries from the latter. At that time they had been so reduced by war with southern tribes that they had only 150 warriors. In the general peace with the French, in 1700, they joined their sister nations; and when the Revolutionary War was kindling they alone, of the then Six Nations in the great council, opposed an alliance with the English. They remained faithful to the English-American
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Onondaga Indians, (search)
The Atatarho, or great sachem of the tribe, was chosen to be the first president of the confederacy. They were divided into fourteen clans, with a sachem for each clan, and their domain extended from Deep Spring, near Manlius, Onondaga co., west to a line between Cross and Otter lakes. This nation carried on war with the Indians in Canada, and also with the French, after their advent on the St. Lawrence; An Onondaga council. and they were prominent in the destruction of the Hurons. In 1653 they made peace with the French, and received Jesuit missionaries among them. The peace was not lasting, and in 1662 a large force of Onondagas ravaged Montreal Island. They again made peace, and in 1668 the French mission was re-established. As the English extended their influence among the Five Nations, the Iroquois were won to their interest, and the Onondagas permitted them to erect a fort in their domain; but when, in 1696, Frontenac invaded their territory, the Onondagas destroyed
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Parris, Samuel 1653-1720 (search)
Parris, Samuel 1653-1720 Clergyman; born in London, England, in 1653; was first a merchant and then a minister. It was in his family that Salem witchcraft began its terrible work, and he was the most zealous prosecutor of persons accused of the black art. In April, 1693, his church brought charges against him. He acknowledged his error and was dismissed. He preached in various places afterwards, but was an unhappy wanderer, and died in Sudbury, Mass., Feb. 27, 1720. Parris, Samuel 1653-1720 Clergyman; born in London, England, in 1653; was first a merchant and then a minister. It was in his family that Salem witchcraft began its terrible work, and he was the most zealous prosecutor of persons accused of the black art. In April, 1693, his church brought charges against him. He acknowledged his error and was dismissed. He preached in various places afterwards, but was an unhappy wanderer, and died in Sudbury, Mass., Feb. 27, 1720.
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Representative government. (search)
whom he might select nine as representatives of the tax-payers. He hedged this representative assembly as tightly as possible with restrictions. The first nine were to choose their successors, so that he need not go to the people again. They nourished the prolific seed of democracy then planted. Stuyvesant tried to stifle its growth; persecution promoted it. Settlers from New England were now many among the Dutch, and imbibed their republican sentiments. Finally, late in the autumn of 1653, nineteen delegates, who represented eight villages or communities, assembled at the City Hall in New Amsterdam, without the governor's consent, to take measures for the public good. They demanded that no new laws shall be enacted but with the consent of the people, that none shall be appointed to office but with the approbation of the people, and that obscure and obsolete laws shall never be revived. Stuyvesant, angered by what he called their impertinence, ordered them to disperse on pa
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Shute, Samuel 1653-1742 (search)
Shute, Samuel 1653-1742 Colonial governor; born in London, England, in 1653; received a collegiate education; appointed royal governor of Massachusetts in 1716, but his administration was marked by unfortunate struggles with the Assembly over his prerogatives. In 1723 he visited England to arrange the difficulties; was about to return, in June, 1727, when the King died and a new governor was appointed. He died in England, April 15, 1742. Shute, Samuel 1653-1742 Colonial governor; born in London, England, in 1653; received a collegiate education; appointed royal governor of Massachusetts in 1716, but his administration was marked by unfortunate struggles with the Assembly over his prerogatives. In 1723 he visited England to arrange the difficulties; was about to return, in June, 1727, when the King died and a new governor was appointed. He died in England, April 15, 1742.
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Stone, William 1603-1695 (search)
Stone, William 1603-1695 Colonial governor; born in Northamptonshire, England, about 1603; settled in Virginia. Later he arranged with the second Lord Baltimore, Cecil Calvert, to place in Maryland 500 Puritan colonists who claimed to have been ill-treated by the Episcopalians in Virginia. He was governor of Lord Baltimore's province in 1648-53. In recognition of his services to the proprietary he was given as much land as he could ride around in a day. He died in Charles county, Md., about 1695.
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Stuyvesant, Peter 1602-1682 (search)
so he summoned representatives of the people to meet at New Amsterdam to provide for it. This germ of popular rule he tried to smother, but in vain, and there were angry controversies between the governor and the people during nearly the whole of his administration. A fort built by the Dutch on the Delaware in 1651 was captured by the Swedes in 1654. This caused Stuyvesant to lead an expedition in person against the Swedes the next year, which resulted in the subjugation of New Sweden. In 1653 a convention of two deputies from each village in New Netherland demanded certain political rights for the people, and gave the governor to understand that they should act independently of him. He stormed and threatened, but to no purpose. The spirit of resistance increased. Disturbed by encroachments of the English on the east, he remonstrated, but in vain, and was compelled to yield to the pressure of changing circumstances around him. Finally, when an English military and naval force cam
1 2 3 4 5 6