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Cambridge History of American Literature: volume 3 (ed. Trent, William Peterfield, 1862-1939., Erskine, John, 1879-1951., Sherman, Stuart Pratt, 1881-1926., Van Doren, Carl, 1885-1950.) 2 2 Browse Search
Cambridge History of American Literature: volume 2 (ed. Trent, William Peterfield, 1862-1939., Erskine, John, 1879-1951., Sherman, Stuart Pratt, 1881-1926., Van Doren, Carl, 1885-1950.) 2 2 Browse Search
Historic leaves, volume 1, April, 1902 - January, 1903 2 2 Browse Search
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Henry Walcott Boynton, Reader's History of American Literature 2 2 Browse Search
Col. O. M. Roberts, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 12.1, Alabama (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 1 1 Browse Search
Edward H. Savage, author of Police Recollections; Or Boston by Daylight and Gas-Light ., Boston events: a brief mention and the date of more than 5,000 events that transpired in Boston from 1630 to 1880, covering a period of 250 years, together with other occurrences of interest, arranged in alphabetical order 1 1 Browse Search
George Ticknor, Life, letters and journals of George Ticknor (ed. George Hillard) 1 1 Browse Search
Henry Morton Stanley, Dorothy Stanley, The Autobiography of Sir Henry Morton Stanley 1 1 Browse Search
The Daily Dispatch: January 15, 1863., [Electronic resource] 1 1 Browse Search
Historic leaves, volume 8, April, 1909 - January, 1910 1 1 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing). You can also browse the collection for 1728 AD or search for 1728 AD in all documents.

Your search returned 34 results in 29 document sections:

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Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Mather, cotton 1663-1728 (search)
Mather, cotton 1663-1728 Clergyman; born in Boston, Feb. 12, 1663; was one of the most notable of the early New England divines. He graduated at Harvard in 1678, was employed several years in teaching, and was ordained a minister in May, 1684, as colleague of his father, Dr. Increase Mather. The doctrine of special providence he carried to excess. He was credulous and superstitious, and believed he was doing God service by witch-hunting. His Wonders of the invisible world (1692) gives an account of the trials of witchcraft. In 1700 he published More wonders, and seems never to have relinquished his belief in witches and witchcraft. Aside from this peculiarity, he was a most sincere, earnest, indefatigable Christian worker, engaging in every good work; and he was the first to employ the press extensively in this country in the dissemination of tracts treating of temperance, religion, and social morals. He preached and wrote for sailors, Indians, Cotton Mather. and negroe
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Montgomerie, John 1728-1731 (search)
Montgomerie, John 1728-1731 Colonial governor; born in Ayrshire, Scotland; was officially attached to the person of King George II.; served several years in Parliament; and came to America in the capacity of governor of New York in 1728. He died in New York City, July 1, 1731. Montgomerie, John 1728-1731 Colonial governor; born in Ayrshire, Scotland; was officially attached to the person of King George II.; served several years in Parliament; and came to America in the capacity of governor of New York in 1728. He died in New York City, July 1, 1731.
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Morris, Staats long 1728-1800 (search)
Morris, Staats long 1728-1800 Military officer; born at Morrisania, N. Y., Aug. 27, 1728; brother of Lewis Morris, the signer. In 1756 he was a captain in the British army, and in 1761 was lieutenant-colonel of a regiment of Highlanders. He was a brigadier-general as early as 1763, and in 1796 had reached the rank of general. The next year he was made governor of Quebec. His first wife was the Duchess of Gordon. He died in 1800.
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Newspapers. (search)
at it was smothered by the magistrates on the day of its birth. The first permanent newspaper was the Boston news-letter, issued in April, 1704. With it newspaper reporting began. In the report of the execution of six pirates, the speeches, prayers, etc., were printed as near as it could be taken in writing in the great crowd. The dates of the first issuing of newspapers in the original thirteen States are as follows: In Massachusetts, 1704; Pennsylvania, 1719; New York, 1725; Maryland, 1728; South Carolina, 1732 (the first newspaper issued south of the Potomac) ; Rhode Island, 1732; Virginia, 1736; Connecticut, 1755; North Carolina, 1755; New Hampshire, 1756; Delaware, 1761. The first daily newspaper was the Pennsylvania packet, or General Advertiser, published by John Dunlap, in 1784, and afterwards called the Daily Advertiser. The number of newspapers in 1775 was only thirty-four, with a total weekly circulation of 5,000 copies. In 1833 the first of the cheap or penny paper
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Ogden, David 1707- (search)
Ogden, David 1707- Jurist; born in Newark, N. J., in 1707; graduated at Yale in 1728; appointed judge of the Supreme Court of New Jersey in 1772, but was obliged to resign at the beginning of the War of the Revolution. He was in England the greater portion of the time until 1789, acting as agent for the loyalists who had claims on Great Britain, and he secured a compensation of $100,000 for his own losses. He settled in Whitestone, N. Y., in 1789, and died there in June, 1800.
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Proud, Robert 1728-1813 (search)
Proud, Robert 1728-1813 Historian; born in Yorkshire, England, May 10, 1728; went to Philadelphia in 1759, where he taught Greek and Latin in a Quaker academy until the breaking-out of the Revolution, when he gave a passive adherence to the British crown. In 1797 his History of Pennsylvania was published. It embraces the period between 1681 and 1742. He died in Philadelphia, July 7, 1813.
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Quincy, Josiah 1709-1784 (search)
Quincy, Josiah 1709-1784 Merchant; born in Braintree, Mass., in 1709; graduated at Harvard in 1728; appointed joint commissioner with Thomas Pownall, from Massachusetts, in 1755, to negotiate an alliance with New York and Pennsylvania against the French, and to erect Fort Ticonderoga as a defence against invasion from Canada. He died in Braintree in 1784. Patriot; born in Boston, Mass., Feb. 23, 1744; third son of Josiah Quincy; graduated at Harvard College in 1763, and soon rose to distinction as a lawyer. He was fervent and influential as a speaker and writer. In 1770 he, with John Adams, defended Captain Preston. Ill-health compelled him to abandon all business. He made a voyage to Charleston in February, 1773, which gave him much benefit, but his constitution was permanently impaired. He took part in public affairs, speaking against British oppression fervidly and eloquently, until September, 1774, when he made a voyage to England. In London he labored incessant
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Rodney, Cesar 1728-1784 (search)
Rodney, Cesar 1728-1784 A signer of the Declaration of Independence; born in Dover. Del., Oct. 7, 1728. At the age of twenty-eight he was appointed sheriff of Kent county, Del., and afterwards was a judge. He represented his district in the legislature, and was sent to the Stamp Act Congress in 1765. For several years he was speaker of the Delaware Assembly; was a member of the committee of correspondence, and of Congress in 1774 arid afterwards. Made a brigadier-general, he was active in supplying Delaware troops to the army under Washington, and, early in 1777, was in command of the Delaware line in New Jersey. From 1778 to 1782 he was president of his State. He died in Dover, Del., June 29, 1784.
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Sewall, Jonathan 1728- (search)
Sewall, Jonathan 1728- Lawyer; born in Boston, Mass., Aug. 24. 1728: graduated at Harvard College in 1748, and in early life was the intimate associate and friend of John Adams. Like Adams, he was a school-teacher; became a lawyer in 1767; and was appointed attorney-general of Massachusetts. In 1769 he began a suit for the freedom of a negro slave, and was successful, two years before the settlement of the case of the negro Somerset, which Blackstone commended so highly, and Cowper commemorated in poetry. He and Adams finally differed in politics, Sewall taking sides with the crown. When the Revolutionary War broke out, he was residing in the house, at Cambridge, which Washington afterwards occupied as his headquarters, for Sewall went to England, and was among the proscribed in Massachusetts in 1779. In 1788 he removed to St. John, N. B., where he was judge of the admiralty court until his death, Sept. 26, 1796.
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Sewall, Samuel 1652-1730 (search)
Sewall, Samuel 1652-1730 Jurist; born in Bishopstoke, England, March 28, 1652; graduated at Harvard College in 1671; studied divinity; preached a while; came into the possession of great wealth by marrying the daughter of a Boston goldsmith; became an assistant in 1684, and was annually chosen a member of the council from 1692 until 1725. He was a judge from 1712 until 1718, when he became chief-justice of Massachusetts, resigning in 1728, in consequence of age and infirmities. Judge Sewall shared in the general belief in witches and witchcraft, and concurred in the condemnation of many of the accused persons, but afterwards publicly acknowledged his error. He seems to have been the first outspoken abolitionist in the United States, having written a tract against slavery, in which he gave it as his opinion that there would be no progress in gospelling until slavery should be abolished. He died in Boston, Mass., Jan. 1, 1730. See witchcraft, Salem.
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