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Col. O. M. Roberts, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 11.1, Texas (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 1 1 Browse Search
Hon. J. L. M. Curry , LL.D., William Robertson Garrett , A. M. , Ph.D., Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 1.1, Legal Justification of the South in secession, The South as a factor in the territorial expansion of the United States (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 1 1 Browse Search
Lucius R. Paige, History of Cambridge, Massachusetts, 1630-1877, with a genealogical register 1 1 Browse Search
Charles E. Stowe, Harriet Beecher Stowe compiled from her letters and journals by her son Charles Edward Stowe 1 1 Browse Search
Frederick H. Dyer, Compendium of the War of the Rebellion: Battles 1 1 Browse Search
The Daily Dispatch: September 4, 1863., [Electronic resource] 1 1 Browse Search
The Photographic History of The Civil War: in ten volumes, Thousands of Scenes Photographed 1861-65, with Text by many Special Authorities, Volume 9: Poetry and Eloquence. (ed. Francis Trevelyan Miller) 1 1 Browse Search
The Photographic History of The Civil War: in ten volumes, Thousands of Scenes Photographed 1861-65, with Text by many Special Authorities, Volume 7: Prisons and Hospitals. (ed. Francis Trevelyan Miller) 1 1 Browse Search
The Photographic History of The Civil War: in ten volumes, Thousands of Scenes Photographed 1861-65, with Text by many Special Authorities, Volume 1: The Opening Battles. (ed. Francis Trevelyan Miller) 1 1 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 4. (ed. Frank Moore) 1 1 Browse Search
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Your search returned 41 results in 38 document sections:

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Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Davis, Jefferson, 1808-1889 (search)
ervant with a water-bucket, his sister-in-law flung a shawl over his head. It was in this disguise that he was captured. Such is the story as told by C. E. L. Stuart, of Davis's staff. The Confederate President was taken to fort Monroe by way of Savannah and the sea. Reagan, who was captured with Davis, and Alexander H. Stephens were sent to Fort Warren, in Boston Harbor. Inaugural Address>head> The following is the text of the inaugural address, delivered at Montgomery, Ala., Feb. 18, 1861: Gentlemen of the Congress of the Confederate States of America, Friends, and Fellow-Citizens,—Called to the difficult and responsible station of chief executive of the provisional government which you have instituted, I approach the discharge of the duties assigned me with an humble distrust of my abilities, but with a sustaining confidence in the wisdom of those who are to guide and aid me in the administration of public affairs, and an abiding faith in the virtue and patriotism o
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Southern Confederacy. (search)
ndments of the said Constitution, are hereby repealed; and that the Union now subsisting between South Carolina and other States, under the name of the United States of America, is hereby dissolved. This was the first action on the part of a State legislature which led to the Montgomery convention. The delegates from six States—South Carolina, Georgia, Alabama, Mississippi, Louisiana, and Florida met at Montgomery, Ala., Feb. 4, 1861. Jefferson Davis was inaugurated as President, Feb. 18, 1861, and the permanent constitution was adopted March 11, 1861. President Davis appointed Robert Toombs, Secretary of State; C. J. Memminger, Secretary of Treasury; L. Pope Walker, Secretary of War; Stephen R. Mallory, Secretary of Navy; Judah P. Benjamin, Attorney-General; and John H. Reagan, Postmaster-General. The provisional Confederate Congress held four sessions: First, from Feb. 4, 1861, to March 16, 1861; second, from April 29, 1861, to May 22, 1861; third, from July 20, 1861,
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), United States of America. (search)
ctoral vote counted......Feb. 13, 1861 United States arsenal and barracks seized at San Antonio by the Texas State troops......Feb. 16, 1861 United States military posts in Texas surrendered to the State by General Twiggs, U. S. A.......Feb. 18, 1861 Jefferson Davis inaugurated President of the Confederacy......Feb. 18, 1861 Territorial government established in Colorado......Feb. 28, 1861 Gen. D. E. Twiggs dismissed from the army......March 1, 1861 Territorial government estaFeb. 18, 1861 Territorial government established in Colorado......Feb. 28, 1861 Gen. D. E. Twiggs dismissed from the army......March 1, 1861 Territorial government established in Dakota and Nevada......March 2, 1861 [No restrictions as to slavery in the acts establishing these governments.] Gen. Winfield Scott, in a letter to Mr. Seward, submits four plans of dealing with the seceding States: First, by coneiliation, as proposed by Mr. Crittenden or the peace convention; second, collect duties on foreign goods outside the ports of the seceding States and blockade them; third, conquer the seceding States (which will take 300,000 men) and hold them as co
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Alabama (search)
passes an ordinance of secession by 61 to 39; the fourth State to secede ..................... Jan. 11, 1861 Alabama seizes United States arsenal and arms at Mobile, and occupies Forts Morgan and Gaines at entrance of Mobile Bay ................. January, 1861 Provisional Congress of delegates from six seceded States meet at Montgomery ... Feb. 4, 1861 Adopt a provisional constitution ... Feb. 8, 1861 Jefferson Davis inaugurated President of the Confederacy at Montgomery ... Feb. 18, 1861 Seat of Confederate government removed from Montgomery to Richmond, Va ................... ....... July, 1861 There were liberated by the emancipation proclamation 435,132 slaves in Alabama ..................... Jan. 1, 1863 Confederate fleet defeated in Mobile Bay by Admiral Farragut ...... Aug. 5, 1864 [State furnishes to the Confederate service sixty-five regiments of infantry, twelve regiments of cavalry, and twenty-two batteries of artillery. Brewer's History of Alabama
Texas formally accepts the boundary designated by the boundary bill for New Mexico, approved Sept. 9, 1850, by which Texas is to receive $10,000,000 from the United States......Nov. 25, 1852 First overland mail from San Diego, Cal., arrives at San Antonio......Sept. 6, 1857 Enthusiastic Union meeting held at Austin......Dec. 23, 1860 Brig.-Gen. David E. Twiggs surrenders to the State of Texas the United States ordnance depot at San Antonio and contents, valued at $1,200,500......Feb. 18, 1861 State People's convention meets at Austin, Jan. 21; passes an ordinance of secession by vote of 166 to 7, Feb. 1; ratified by popular vote, 34,794 to 11,235......Feb. 23, 1861 Fort Brown, at Brownsville, evacuated and occupied by Texan troops......March 5, 1861 Gov. Sam Houston, opposing secession and favoring separate State action, deposed; Lieutenant-Governor Clark inaugurated......March 20, 1861 Constitution of the Confederate States ratified by legislature, 68 to 2......M
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 1. (ed. Frank Moore), Doc. 30.--the Texas Ordinance of secession. (search)
the compact styled The Constitution of the United States of America be, and is hereby repealed and annulled. That all the powers which, by the said compact, were delegated by Texas to the Federal Government are resumed. That Texas is of right absolved from all restraints and obligations incurred by said compact, and is a separate sovereign State, and that her citizens and people are absolved from all allegance to the United States or the Government thereof. Sec. 2 The ordinance shall be submitted to the people of Texas for their ratification or rejection, by the qualified voters, on the 23d day of February, 1861; and unless rejected by a majority of the votes cast, shall take effect and be in force on and after the 2d day of March, A. D. 1861. Provided that in the representative district of El Paso said election may be held on the 18th day of February, 1861. Done by the people of the State of Texas, in convention assembled, at Austin, the 1st day of February, A. D. 1861.
Frederick H. Dyer, Compendium of the War of the Rebellion: Battles, Texas, 1861 (search)
1861 Feb. 1: Adoption Secession OrdinanceBy State. Feb. 16: Seizure of San Antonio ArsenalBy State Troops. Feb. 18: Surrender of U. S. Posts in TexasBy Gen. Twiggs. Feb. 21: Destruction of U. S. property at Brazos Santiago  Feb. 21: Abandonment of Camp CooperBy U. S. Troops. Feb. 26: Abandonment of Camp ColoradoBy U. S. Troops. March 6: Surrender of Fort Brown  March 7: Abandonment of Ringgold BarracksBy U. S. Troops. March 7: Abandonment of Camp VerdeBy U. S. Troops. March 9: Abandonment of Fort LancasterBy U. S. Troops. March 12: Abandonment of Fort McIntoshBy U. S. Troops. March 15: Abandonment of Camp WoodBy U. S. Troops. March 17: Abandonment of Camp HudsonBy U. S. Troops. March 19: Abandonment of Forks Clarke and IngeBy U. S. Troops. March 20: Abandonment of Forts Brown and DuncanBy U. S. Troops. March 28: Abadonment of Fort ChadbourneBy U. S. Troops. March 29: Abandonment of Fort MasonBy U. S. Troops. March 31: Abandonment of Fort BlissBy U. S. Troops. April
Charles E. Stowe, Harriet Beecher Stowe compiled from her letters and journals by her son Charles Edward Stowe, Chapter 15: the third trip to Europe, 1859. (search)
who has not had his mind drawn to think with reverential fear on these topics. Allow me to hint that the monthly numbers are not long enough. Get us along a little faster. You must work this well out. Elaborate and give us all the particulars. Old Sophie is a jewel; give us more of her. I have seen her. Could you ever come out and spend a day with us? The professor and I would so like to have a talk on some of these matters with you! Very truly yours, H. B. Stowe. Andover, February 18, 1861. Dear Doctor,--I was quite indignant to hear yesterday of the very unjust and stupid attack upon you in the--. Mr. Stowe has written to them a remonstrance which I hope they will allow to appear as he wrote it, and over his name. He was well acquainted with your father and feels the impropriety of the thing. But, my dear friend, in being shocked, surprised, or displeased personally with such things, we must consider other people's natures. A man or woman may wound us to the qu
Lucius R. Paige, History of Cambridge, Massachusetts, 1630-1877, with a genealogical register, Chapter 16: ecclesiastical History. (search)
ore than a year at Milford, commenced his labors here in April, 1822, but was not formally installed until April 23, 1823. He resigned the pastorate, and preached his farewell discourse May 29, 1831, but remained a citizen of Cambridge until the close of his life. As early as June, 1828, he purchased the Universalist Magazine (which was established July 3, 1819), and changed its name to Trumpet and Universalist Magazine. This paper he conducted with consummate skill and energy until Feb. 18, 1861, about a month before his death, when he was compelled, by sheer exhaustion, to relinquish the charge. He represented the town three years in the General Court, and served the city one year in the Board of Aldermen. For many years he was President of the Cambridge Bank, and also of the Fitchburg and the Vermont and Massachusetts Railroads. He continued to preach, almost every Sabbath, until near the close of life. In 1837, he published Songs of Zion, a volume of sacred music, a porti
50 each and were not accepted. The committee did not, in the slightest degree, implicate Governor Floyd. Alas! what becomes of Senator Sherman's conjured up superior preparation for war and of General Scott's good arms stolen? It is of a piece with the rifle pitfalls with which Northern papers, after the Bull Run escapade, in which some Republican congressmen shared, said the whole country was honeycombed. (See Reports of House Committee on Military Affairs, 9th January, 1861, and 18th February, 1861—Report No. 85.) Secretary Floyd, by inheritance and conviction, was a thorough believer in State rights, but was opposed to secession and in favor of employing every right and proper expedient for averting or postponing it. His diary of the secret meetings and discussions of Mr. Buchanan's cabinet, during November, 1860, shows how averse he was to what he regarded the unwise and precipitate action of South Carolina. He addressed himself with great assiduity to the task of repress
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