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Judith White McGuire, Diary of a southern refugee during the war, by a lady of Virginia 2 2 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 11. (ed. Frank Moore) 1 1 Browse Search
George Meade, The Life and Letters of George Gordon Meade, Major-General United States Army (ed. George Gordon Meade) 1 1 Browse Search
Edward Porter Alexander, Military memoirs of a Confederate: a critical narrative 1 1 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 8. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 1 1 Browse Search
The Photographic History of The Civil War: in ten volumes, Thousands of Scenes Photographed 1861-65, with Text by many Special Authorities, Volume 5: Forts and Artillery. (ed. Francis Trevelyan Miller) 1 1 Browse Search
The Daily Dispatch: July 12, 1862., [Electronic resource] 1 1 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 5. (ed. Frank Moore) 1 1 Browse Search
William F. Fox, Lt. Col. U. S. V., Regimental Losses in the American Civil War, 1861-1865: A Treatise on the extent and nature of the mortuary losses in the Union regiments, with full and exhaustive statistics compiled from the official records on file in the state military bureaus and at Washington 1 1 Browse Search
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 3. 1 1 Browse Search
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Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 8. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), chapter 5.46 (search)
General J. E. Johnston's official report of the battle of Seven Pines, or fair oaks. [The following important report was not published in the volumes of Confederate reports printed during the war, and we are sure that the general reader will be glad to see a document of such interest, while the historian will thank us for putting in permanent form so valuable a report.] Richmond, June 24th, 1862. General S. Cooper, Adjutant and Inspector-General: Sir — Before the 30th May I had ascertained from trusty scouts that Keyes' corps was encamped on this side of the Chickahominy, near the Williamsburg road. On that day Major-General D. H. Hill reported a strong body immediately in his front. On receiving this report I determined to attack them next morning — hoping to be able to defeat Keyes' corps completely in its more advanced position before it could be reinforced. Written orders were dispatched to Major-Generals Hill, Huger and G. W. Smith--General Longstreet, being nea
Edward Porter Alexander, Military memoirs of a Confederate: a critical narrative, chapter 7 (search)
en an easier task than the first. All this was in the game which Lee set out to play on June 26, and the stakes were already his if his execution were even half as good as his plan. At the beginning there was every promise that it would be. Two days before, a confidential order had been issued to general officers and heads of departments, which is given in part, in contrast with Johnston's method, as developed at Seven Pines. General orders no. 75. Headquarters in the field, June 24, 1862. Gen. Jackson's command will proceed to-morrow from Ashland toward the Stark (or Merry Oaks) Church, and encamp at some convenient point west of the Central Railroad. Branch's brigade of A. P. Hill's division will also, to-morrow evening, take position on the Chickahominy near Half-Sink. At three o'clock Thursday morning, 26th inst., Gen. Jackson will advance on the road leading to Pole Green Church, communicating his march to Gen. Branch, who will immediately cross the Chickahomi
George Meade, The Life and Letters of George Gordon Meade, Major-General United States Army (ed. George Gordon Meade), chapter 4 (search)
e would long before now have been in Richmond. Last night we heard from a deserter that we were to be attacked to-day. We were all under arms before daybreak, but everything has been quiet up to this moment, (9 A. M.). I suppose you have heard of William Palmer's death. They seemed to be quite shocked at it at headquarters, as he had left only about a week ago, sick, but not considered dangerously so. Poor fellow! his death makes me a Major of Topogs. camp near New bridge, Va., June 24, 1862. We have been in a pleasant state of excitement for the last twentyfour hours, under the impression that the enemy were disposed to attack our right flank in force, in which case the first onset would be received by our division. The result of this little expectation is our being under arms from before daylight (3 A. M.) till nightfall, and the almost total destruction of one's rest at night by constant and frequent orders, messages, etc., occurring from hour to hour. The trouble a
essel by bolts, which are provided with elastic washercushions. Callender and Northrup's armor. Ballard's armor. Callender and North- Rup's Defensive Armor, May 27, 1862, is composed of ribbed plates which are fastened to interior concave stringers by bolts passing through the stringers and into metallic tubes between them; each plate has a lap at its edge to fit the corresponding edge of the next plate, to which it is riveted. The nuts are on the outside. Ballard's armor, June 24, 1862, consists of a series of inner iron ribs A A, with interposed wooden frames B B, longitudinal covering bars or plates C C, diagonal bars or plates D E, and outer covering plates F F. Hotchkiss's armor. Hotchkiss's Metallic Defensive armor for vessels and fortifications is formed by a series of plates, in which the lower ones over lap the higher, so that when any one of them is struck by a projectile, the projecting edge may become detached, glancing the shot on to the next plate, b
, 1873. 139,422W. RichardsMay 27, 1873. 3. (b.) Moving Laterally. 168Fisher and ChamberlinApr. 17, 1837. 14,667P. LancasterApr. 15, 1856. *19,387C. C. TerrillFeb. 16, 1858. 33,560Vittum and StevensOct. 22, 1861. 35,685P. J. JarreJune 24, 1862. 51,225E. SchoppNov. 28, 1865. 4. Swinging or rotating Laterally. (a.) On a Longitudinal Pin or Hinge. No.Name.Date. 193W. H. HubbellMar. 11, 1837. *364S. DayAug. 31, 1837. 3,649W. W. HubbellJuly 1, 1844. 6,139D. MinesingerFeb. 2. 30,537E. MaynardOct. 30, 1860. 33,435B. F. JoslynOct. 8, 1861. 33,907W. H. SmithDec. 10, 1861. *34,126Brady and NobleJan. 14, 1862. 34,449B. F. Skinner and A. Plummer, Jr.Feb. 18, 1862. 34,854S. W. WoodApr. 1, 1862. 35,688B. F. JoslynJune 24, 1862. *35,996J. B. DoolittleJuly 29, 1862. *36,358J. NicholsSept. 2, 1862. 37,208S. StrongDec. 16, 1862. 38,366L. AlbrightMay 5, 1863. 38,643S. StrongMay 19, 1863. 38,644S. StrongMay 19, 1863. 39,198J. DavisJuly 7, 1863. 39,407B. F. Joslyn
smit the load to the arch. Span′drel-wall. (Masonry.) One built on the extrados of an arch. Machine for attaching spangles to hoop-skirts. Span′gling-ma-chine′. A machine for setting and securing the clasps or spangles by which the wires and tapes of hoop-skirts are secured together. The spangles are placed in a hopper, and automatically take their place in line in an inclined feedingchute, which leads them to the clinching mechanism. See patents — No. 35,666.BeckJune 24, 1862. No. 36,877.DeForestNov. 4, 1862. No. 37,124.BairdDec. 9, 1862. No. 37,992.WilmotMar. 24, 1863. No. 50,728.OlmsteadOct. 31, 1865. No. 54,939.NeumannMay. 23, 1866. No. 64,543.KompMay. 7, 1867. No. 71,492.JenkinsonNov. 26, 1867. No. 79,810.CarterJuly 14, 1868. In Fig. 5342, the frame A carries a standard B, supporting the inclined trough C, into which a quantity of the spangles are placed. These slide down by gravity, and on reaching the throat of the spangle-guide D, tho
Frederick H. Dyer, Compendium of the War of the Rebellion: Battles, California, 1862 (search)
achment Co. "E"). May 31: Skirmish, Van Dusen's Creek, near Eel RiverCALIFORNIA--3d Infantry (Detachment). June 6-7: Skirmishes, Daley's Farm, Mad River, near ArcataCALIFORNIA--2d Cavalry (Detachment Co. "E"); 2d Infantry (Detachment Co. "E"). June 7: Skirmish, Mattole ValleyCALIFORNIA--2d Infantry (Detachment). June 8: Skirmish, Fawn Prairie, near Liscombe's HillCALIFORNIA--2d Infantry (Detachment). June 11-Oct. 8: Exp. from Camp Latham to Owens RiverCALIFORNIA--2d Cavalry (Co. "G"). June 24: Skirmish, Owens' LakeCALIFORNIA--2d Cavalry (Cos. "D," "G," "I"). July 2: Skirmish, Cutterback's House, on Van Dusen CreekCALIFORNIA--2d Infantry (Detachment Co. "E"). July 9: Skirmish, Weaverville Crossing, Mad RiverCALIFORNIA--2d Infantry (Detachment Co. "K"). July 28: Skirmish, Whitney's Ranch near Fort AndersonCALIFORNIA--2d Infantry (Detachment). July 29: Skirmish, Albee's RanchCALIFORNIA--2d Infantry (Detachment Co. "F"). July 30: Affair, Miller's Ranch near Elk CampCALIFORNIA 3
Frederick H. Dyer, Compendium of the War of the Rebellion: Battles, Mississippi, 1862 (search)
June 18: Skirmish, Tallahatchie BridgeILLINOIS--4th Cavalry. Union loss, 4 wounded. June 21: Exp. to HernandoILLINOIS--6th (Cos. "G" "H," "I," "K" and "L") and 11th (Detachment 3d Battalion) Cavalry. June 21: Skirmish, Coldwater StationILLINOIS--6th (Cos. "G" "H," "I," "K" and "L") and 11th (Detachment 3d Battalion) Cavalry. June 22: Action, Ellis CliffCONNECTICUT--9th Infantry. MASSACHUSETTS--2d and 6th Batteries Light Arty.; 30th Infantry. June 22: Exp. to Pass Christian(No detalls.) June 24: Skirmish, Hamilton's Plantation, near Grand GulfCONNECTICUT--9th Infantry. MASSACHUSETTS--2d and 6th Batteries Light Arty.; 30th Infantry. VERMONT--7th Infantry. Batteries "D," "H," "I," "K" and "M", 1st Light Arty.; June 26-29: Engagement, VicksburgU. S. Navy, Farragut's Fleet. June 28: Skirmishes, BlacklandILLINOIS--7th Cavalry (Co. "K"). MICHIGAN--3d Cavalry (Detachment). Union loss, 1 wounded, 1 missing. Total, 2. June 29: Skirmish, RipleyMICHIGAN--3d Cavalry. July 1: Action, Boone
Frederick H. Dyer, Compendium of the War of the Rebellion: Battles, North Carolina, 1862 (search)
16: Skirmish, PollocksvilleMARYLAND--2d Infantry. May 22: Skirmish, Trenton and Pollocksville RoadMASSACHUSETTS--17th Infantry (Co. "I"). May 30: Skirmish, Tranter's CreekNEW YORK--3d Cavalry (Detachment Co. "I"). Union loss, 1 wounded. June 2: Skirmish, Tranter's CreekNEW YORK--3d Cavalry (Detachment); 1st Marine Arty. (Detachment). June 5: Action, Tranter's CreekMASSACHUSETTS--24th Infantry. NEW YORK--3d Cavalry (Co. "I"); 1st Marine Arty. Union loss, 7 killed, 11 wounded. Total, 18. June 24: Reconnoissance from Washington to Tranter's CreekNEW YORK--3d Cavalry (Co. "I"). June 27: Skirmish, Swift Creek BridgeNEW YORK--3d Cavalry (Detachment); 1st Marine Arty. (Detachment). July 9: Capture of HamiltonNEW YORK--9th Infantry (1 Co.). UNITED STATES--Gunboats "Commodore Perry," "Ceres" and "Shawsheen." Union loss, 1 killed, 21 wounded. Total, 22. July 24-28: Expedition from Newberne to Trenton and PollocksvilleMASSACHUSETTS--17th, 25th and 27th Infantry. NEW YORK--3d Cavalry. RHO
Frederick H. Dyer, Compendium of the War of the Rebellion: Battles, Virginia, 1862 (search)
NIA--8th Cavalry. June 22-30: Scout from StrasburgCONNECTICUT--1st Cavalry (Co. "B"). June 23: Operations about New Kent Court HousePENNSYLVANIA--11th Cavalry. June 24: Skirmish, Fair OaksMASSACHUSETTS--29th Infantry. NEW YORK--63d Infantry. June 24: Skirmish, MechanicsvilleNEW YORK--77th Infantry. June 24: Skirmish, MilfordMAJune 24: Skirmish, MechanicsvilleNEW YORK--77th Infantry. June 24: Skirmish, MilfordMAINE--1st Cavalry (Detachment). MICHIGAN--1st Cavalry (Detachment). June 25: Skirmish, AshlandILLINOIS--8th Cavalry (Detachment). June 25-July 1: Battles of the Seven Days' Retreat from before RichmondCONNECTICUT--1st Heavy Arty. DELAWARE--2d Infantry. INDIANA--20th Infantry. ILLINOIS--8th Cavalry; McClellan's Dragoons; Sturgis' RJune 24: Skirmish, MilfordMAINE--1st Cavalry (Detachment). MICHIGAN--1st Cavalry (Detachment). June 25: Skirmish, AshlandILLINOIS--8th Cavalry (Detachment). June 25-July 1: Battles of the Seven Days' Retreat from before RichmondCONNECTICUT--1st Heavy Arty. DELAWARE--2d Infantry. INDIANA--20th Infantry. ILLINOIS--8th Cavalry; McClellan's Dragoons; Sturgis' Rifles. MAINE--2d, 3d, 4th, 5th, 6th, 7th and 11th Infantry. MARYLAND--Batteries "A" and "B" Light Arty. MASSACHUSETTS--3d and 5th Batteries Light Arty.; 1st and 2d Companies S. S.; 1st, 7th, 9th, 10th, 11th, 15th, 16th, 18th, 19th, 20th, 22d and 29th Infantry. MICHIGAN--Brady's S. S.; 1st, 2d, 3d, 4th, 5th, 7th and 16th Infantry. M
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