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Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 3. 6 6 Browse Search
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Harvard Memorial Biographies 5 5 Browse Search
The Annals of the Civil War Written by Leading Participants North and South (ed. Alexander Kelly McClure) 5 5 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 14. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 4 4 Browse Search
Daniel Ammen, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 7.2, The Atlantic Coast (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 4 4 Browse Search
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Massachusetts in the Army and Navy during the war of 1861-1865, vol. 1, Condensed history of regiments. 4 4 Browse Search
Joseph T. Derry , A. M. , Author of School History of the United States; Story of the Confederate War, etc., Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 6, Georgia (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 3 3 Browse Search
The Photographic History of The Civil War: in ten volumes, Thousands of Scenes Photographed 1861-65, with Text by many Special Authorities, Volume 8: Soldier Life and Secret Service. (ed. Francis Trevelyan Miller) 3 3 Browse Search
Edward Porter Alexander, Military memoirs of a Confederate: a critical narrative 3 3 Browse Search
The Photographic History of The Civil War: in ten volumes, Thousands of Scenes Photographed 1861-65, with Text by many Special Authorities, Volume 4: The Cavalry (ed. Francis Trevelyan Miller) 3 3 Browse Search
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Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 4. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Causes of the defeat of Gen. Lee's Army at the battle of Gettysburg-opinions of leading Confederate soldiers. (search)
on, and is indisputably correct, except where, in the absence of the official returns, Mr. Swinton has substituted his own estimates or conjectures for the months of June and August, 1862, and June, 1863. You will observe that, at the close of May, 1863, the whole force for duty in the Department of Northern Virginia consisted of 68,352 men and officers. The Department of Northern Virginia embraced all that portion of eastern Virginia and the Valley north of James river, and included all theing-hammer process, we must inevitably have succumbed, if we had remained on the defensive entirely, just as it is said the constant dropping of water will wear away the hardest stone. Let us look at the condition of affairs at the close of May, 1863. The Federal forces held possession of Fortress Monroe, Yorktown and Norfolk in Virginia, with the control, by means of gunboats, of the Chesapeake, York river, and James river up to the mouth of the Appomattox — of the entire coast of North C
Doc. 64.-the siege of Suffolk, Va. April and May, 1863. the siege of Suffolk was raised on the third of May, 1863, almost simultaneously with the mortifying disaster at Chancellorsville. The latter event in its absorbing influence upon the public mind drew away all thought from the minor operations about Suffolk, and in the absence of any apparent important results, the stubborn and successful defence of that town has never received a tithe of the public recognition its merit warranted. Close examination of the facts, however, will reveal that in two points of view it presents one of the most interesting chapters of the war. 1st. In its bearing upon the general progress of our arms, and secondly, as presenting to the military student an example of the defence of a fortified place against an enormous investing force, in which the entire success of the garrison was unblemished by a single reverse. Its fortifications were hastily constructed by the troops with incre
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War: Volume 2., Ball's Bluff and the arrest of General Stone. (search)
se he chose was that which seemed to him his duty. Mr. Stanton instantly renewed the order, and Stone's ruin was accomplished. Not only were no charges ever preferred, but no acknowledgment of error was ever made, unless Stone's retention in the service and his restoration to duty, long subsequently, and under secret surveillance, be so considered. General McClellan in vain applied for him. General Hooker's first act on taking command was to ask for him as chief-of-staff. At last, in May, 1863, upon the earnest request of General Banks, commanding the Department of the Gulf, Stone was ordered to report to him. He arrived during the siege of Port Hudson, and rendered valuable service, though without assignment. Immediately afterward, General Banks appointed him chief-of-staff, in which capacity he served until April 16th, 1864, when, coincidently with the disaster on the Red River, but under orders previously issued at Washington, he was deprived of his commission as brigadier-g
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 3., Union vessels in the Vicksburg operations. (search)
's Bluff, Yazoo River, Yazoo City, Milliken's Bend), April 9th, 1863, 4 guns; May, 1863, 4 guns, 2 howitzers; June 8th, 1863, 6 guns, 2 howitzers; Lafayette, Capt. H-Com. Le Roy Fitch; Act. Master Geo. J. Groves, September, 1862, 4 howitzers; May, 1863, 1 gun, 6 howitzers; General Bragg, Lieut. Joshua Bishop, September, 1862, 2 V. Lieut. John Scott, Act. V. Lieut. C. Dominy, September, 1862, 4 howitzers; May, 1863, 6 howitzers; November, 1863, 2 guns, 6 howitzers. various vessels.--Alexaeut. A. R. Langthorne, 4 guns, 4 howitzers; Kenwood, Act. Master John Swaney, May, 1863, 2 guns, 4 howitzers; Key West, Act. V. Lieut. E. M. King, May, 1863, 6 howitMay, 1863, 6 howitzers; June 16th, 1863, 8 howitzers; Moose, Lieut.-Com. LeRoy Fitch, 6 howitzers; Naumkeag, Act. Master John Rogers, 2 guns, 4 howitzers; New Era, Act. Master F. W. F-Com. John Watters. Cooperating vessels of West Gulf Squadron, in Red River, May, 1863: Albatross, Lieut.-Com. John E. Hart; Estrella, Lieut.-Com. A. P. Cooke; Ariz
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 4., The navy in the Red River. (search)
. L. Phelps), Osage (Lieutenant-Commander T. O. Selfridge), Fort Hindman (Acting-Master John Pearce), and Cricket (Lieutenant H. H. Gorringe) were ordered to go ahead and clear the obstructions that were known to exist below Fort De Russy, a strong fortification constructed by the Confederates earlier in the war, recently strengthened, and now armed with heavy guns in casemates protected with railroad iron. Fort De Russy was captured by the navy in the first movement up the Red River in May, 1863, but was afterward abandoned when the army marched to Port Hudson (see Vol. III., p. 592).--editors. These obstructions were reached March 14th, and were found to consist of a row of piles across the river, supported by a second row bolted to the first; a forest of trees had been cut and floated against them, with their branches interlaced with the piles. It was slow work clearing a passage, owing to the strength of the current and to the raft of logs and the snags above the piling, so t
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 4., Operations South of the James River. (search)
ater River, on the 20th of April. Previous operations in south-eastern Virginia have been referred to by General Longstreet in Vol. III., p. 244, and in the foot-note, p. 265. General John J. Peck, whose division of the Fourth Army Corps (Keyes's) remained on the Peninsula when the Army of the Potomac was withdrawn (see p. 438, Vol. II.), and who took command at Suffolk soon after, gives the following account of events on the Nansemond and the Black-water, between September, 1862, and May, 1863 [see map, p. 494]: On the 22d September, 1862, I was ordered to Suffolk, with about 9000 men, to repel the advance of Generals Pettigrew and French from the Black water with 15,000 [5000] men. . . . Situated at the head of the Nansemond River, with the railway to Petersburg and Weldon, Suffolk is the key to all the approaches to the mouth of the James River on the north of the Dismal Swamp. Regarding the James as second only in importance to the Mississippi for the Confederates, . . .
Benson J. Lossing, Pictorial Field Book of the Civil War. Volume 2., Chapter 5: military and naval operations on the coast of South Carolina.--military operations on the line of the Potomac River. (search)
for his arrest; the law requiring the officer issuing such order to give a statement in writing, signed with his own name, and noting the offense, within twenty-four hours. Halleck, then General-in-Chief, knew nothing about it. Stone then went to the President, who said he knew nothing about the matter, but kindly remarked, I could never be made to believe General Stone was a traitor. In endeavors to give to his country his active services in the war he was thwarted, and it was not until May, 1863, that he was allowed to enter again upon duty in the field, when he was ordered to report to General Banks, then the commander of the Department of the Gulf. He served faithfully during the remainder of the war, until prostrated by malarious fever before Petersburg, when the service lost a meritorious and patriotic officer. In this connection, the following letter, written to the author by the Superintendent of the Metropolitan Police of the City of New York, may be appropriately given
Benson J. Lossing, Pictorial Field Book of the Civil War. Volume 2., Chapter 22: the siege of Vicksburg. (search)
truggling at Raymond, and when the result of that struggle was known to Grant, he ordered the other corps to move toward Jackson. He had learned that General Joseph E. Johnston, the ablest of the Confederate leaders, was hourly expected at Jackson, to take the command of the Confederate troops in that region in person. Perhaps he was already there. I therefore determined, Grant said in his report, to make sure of that place, and leave no enemy in my rear. On the morning of the 13th, May, 1863. McPherson pushed on to Clinton, which he entered unopposed at two o'clock in the afternoon, and began tearing up the railway between that town and Jackson. Sherman was marching at the same time on the direct road from Raymond to Jackson, while McClernand was moving to a point near Raymond. That night was a tempestuous one. The rain fell heavily, and made wretched roads. But the troops under Grant were never overcome by mud, and early the next morning May 14. Sherman and McPherson pus
Benson J. Lossing, Pictorial Field Book of the Civil War. Volume 2., Chapter 23: siege and capture of Vicksburg and Port Hudson. (search)
ult. Grant ordered the attack to be commenced at two o'clock in the afternoon of the 19th. May, 1863. It was begun by Sherman's corps, which was nearest the works on the northeastern side of the ions, and requested him to engage the batteries on the river front, on the night of the 21st, May, 1863. as a diversion, as he intended to storm their works on the land side with his entire army thelmost powerless to help. I am too weak to save Vicksburg, he wrote to Pemberton on the 29th, May, 1863. in reply to a dispatch that reached him. Can do no more than attempt to save you and your gar20. The troops with which Banks cross-ed the river at Bayou Sara formed a junction on the 23d May, 1863. with those which came up from Baton Rouge under Auger and Sherman, and the National line on tvelop it by a general assault. Orders were given accordingly, and on the morning of the 27th May, 1863. his artillery opened upon them with spirit, and continued firing during nearly the whole day.
Benson J. Lossing, Pictorial Field Book of the Civil War. Volume 3., Chapter 7: the siege of Charleston to the close of 1863.--operations in Missouri, Arkansas, and Texas. (search)
ready considered, occurred there down to the beginning of 1864. Our record of military events in that part of the Republic closed with the Battle of Prairie Grove, in Arkansas, early in December, 1862; See pages 585 and 536, volume II. the recapture of Galveston See page 594, volume II. and the reoccupation of all Texas, by the Confederates, at the beginning of 1863; See page 595, volume II. Banks's triumphant march through the interior of Louisiana to the Red River, in April and May, 1863, See pages from 595 to 600 inclusive, volume II and the Battle of Helena, in July following. See page 148. Turning to Missouri and Arkansas, in which the Unionists were the majority and the political power was held by loyal men, especially in the former State, we see those commonwealths, after brief repose, again convulsed in 1863 by the machinations of disloyal resident citizens, and the contests of hostile forces in arms. One of the worst enemies of Missouri (the rebel Governo
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