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Lydia Maria Child, Letters of Lydia Maria Child (ed. John Greenleaf Whittier, Wendell Phillips, Harriet Winslow Sewall) 7 7 Browse Search
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Massachusetts in the Army and Navy during the war of 1861-1865, vol. 2 6 6 Browse Search
Hon. J. L. M. Curry , LL.D., William Robertson Garrett , A. M. , Ph.D., Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 1.1, Legal Justification of the South in secession, The South as a factor in the territorial expansion of the United States (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 6 6 Browse Search
Bliss Perry, The American spirit in lierature: a chronicle of great interpreters 6 6 Browse Search
Mary Thacher Higginson, Thomas Wentworth Higginson: the story of his life 6 6 Browse Search
Adam Badeau, Grant in peace: from Appomattox to Mount McGregor, a personal memoir 5 5 Browse Search
Francis Jackson Garrison, William Lloyd Garrison, 1805-1879; the story of his life told by his children: volume 1 5 5 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 11. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 5 5 Browse Search
History of the First Universalist Church in Somerville, Mass. Illustrated; a souvenir of the fiftieth anniversary celebrated February 15-21, 1904 4 4 Browse Search
The writings of John Greenleaf Whittier, Volume 2. (ed. John Greenleaf Whittier) 4 4 Browse Search
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Varina Davis, Jefferson Davis: Ex-President of the Confederate States of America, A Memoir by his Wife, Volume 2, Chapter 78: the commencement and completion of the Rise and fall of the Confederate States of America.—the death of Jefferson Davis, Jr.—Honors Awarded by Mr. Davis's countrymen. (search)
in house, engaged board from her for himself and family when they should be with him, furnished it, put up shelves for his books and papers, and with his servant settled himself there for the work, having written previously to an assistant to join him and establish himself at some convenient distance on the coast. Mrs. Dorsey offered her clerical services at stated hours during the day, and thus a part of the first volume was written. As soon as it was considered advisable, ill April of 1878, leaving my little girl in Carlsruhe, I returned home. After a short time spent with our daughter, Mrs. Hayes, and our only remaining son Jefferson, now grown a strong, sober, industrious, and witty young man, who was exceedingly intimate with his father, and loved him devotedly-indeed they were like two young friends together — I joined my husband at Beauvoir. As Mr. Davis had lost all his papers, the history of the Confederacy was unwritten save by the deeds of its defenders, and he so
Varina Davis, Jefferson Davis: Ex-President of the Confederate States of America, A Memoir by his Wife, Volume 2, Chapter 80: General Joseph E. Johnston and the Confederate treasure. (search)
he army at Greensborough, and I have no papers which would afford information. Yours truly, Archer Anderson. Mr. Davis wrote: Not recollecting to have met Colonel Mason at Charlotte, I wrote him, asking what was the fact. Receiving no reply, I renewed the inquiry, but though considerable time has elapsed, he has not answered. It is possible that I might have met the gentleman without recollecting it, but not probable that I should have received such a letter and have forgotten it. In 1878 Mr. Davis received a letter from a former classmate at West Point, quoting the statement of the United States Treasurer as to the amount of treasure taken at the surrender. Among the items was one that a specified sum had been taken from Jeff Davis. To this letter Mr. Davis replied: Mississippi City, February 4, 1878. The facts you state in regard to captured treasure are new to me. It is probable that most of it was the property of the Richmond banks. The item of money captured fro
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 4. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Editorial Paragraphs. (search)
eigh Robinson? The banquet at the St. Claire hotel was presided over by the president (General W. H. F. Lee), and was a magnificent affair. We regret that we have not room for further notice of the feast of reason and flow of soul which made the occasion one of far more than ordinary interest. The officers of last year (General W. H. F. Lee, president, George L. Christian and Leroy S. Edwards, secretaries, Major R. Stiles, treasurer, &c.,) were unanimously re-elected. Renewals for 1878 are now in order. With this number the subscriptions of a large number of our subscribers will expire, and we beg that they will notify us at once of their desire for us to continue our monthly visits by forwarding the amount of their subscription by check, post-office money-order, or in registered letter. We beg immediate attention to this matter, as we cannot send our January number to any who shall have failed to comply with our terms, which are $3 per annum, cash in advance. the fina
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 5. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), A review of the First two days operations at Gettysburg and a reply to General Longstreet by General Fitz. Lee. (search)
ers givwn him and had made the attack early instead of late. He said further, General Longstreet, when once in a fight, was a most brilliant soldier; but he was the hardest man to move I had in my army. Does this testimony prove that General Lee regretted that he had not adopted another's plan to fight the battle of Gettysburg, or is it not cumulative to all the other well-known facts? Gen. Pleasanton, Meade's cavalry commander, writes a paper for the Philadelphia Times, January. 19th, 1878, in which he tells us what he said to Meade after our repulse on the 3rd, and this is it: I rode up to him, and after congratulating him on the splendid conduct of his Army I said, General, I will give you half an hour to show yourself a great general. Order the army to advance while I take the cavalry; get in Lee's rear and we will finish the campaign in a week. A Sandwich Islander, knowing nothing about the war except what he might read in these papers of Generals Longstreet and Pleasanto
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War: Volume 2., chapter 6.38 (search)
7th Va., Col. Turner Ashby (promoted Brig.-Gen. May 23d); Va. Battery, Capt. R. P. Chew. Cavalry loss: Front Royal and Winchester (partial report), k, 11; w, 15 == 26. (Other casualties in the cavalry during the campaign are not specifically stated.) General Jackson reported his losses at Front Royal, Winchester, etc., from May 23d to 31st, as 68 killed, 329 wounded, and 3 missing == 400. At Cross Keys and Port Republic the casualties were 139 killed, 951 wounded, and 60 missing == 1150. As nearly as can be ascertained from the Official Records, the loss in the campaign was 230 killed, 1373 wounded, and 232 captured or missing == 1878. The strength of Jackson's command is nowhere authoritatively stated. Colonel William Allan says in his Jackson's Valley campaign, p. 146: Jackson had moved against Banks, on May 19th, with a total effective force of 16,000 or 17,000 men. . . . His effective force [at Cross Keys] could not have exceeded 13,000, even if it reached that amount.
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War: Volume 2., The Confederate Army. (search)
7th Va., Col. Turner Ashby (promoted Brig.-Gen. May 23d); Va. Battery, Capt. R. P. Chew. Cavalry loss: Front Royal and Winchester (partial report), k, 11; w, 15 == 26. (Other casualties in the cavalry during the campaign are not specifically stated.) General Jackson reported his losses at Front Royal, Winchester, etc., from May 23d to 31st, as 68 killed, 329 wounded, and 3 missing == 400. At Cross Keys and Port Republic the casualties were 139 killed, 951 wounded, and 60 missing == 1150. As nearly as can be ascertained from the Official Records, the loss in the campaign was 230 killed, 1373 wounded, and 232 captured or missing == 1878. The strength of Jackson's command is nowhere authoritatively stated. Colonel William Allan says in his Jackson's Valley campaign, p. 146: Jackson had moved against Banks, on May 19th, with a total effective force of 16,000 or 17,000 men. . . . His effective force [at Cross Keys] could not have exceeded 13,000, even if it reached that amount.
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War: Volume 2., In vindication of General Rufus King. (search)
here of King's battle, got refreshment, he says, of Ruggles, and went off; but he remembered no message from Pope to King, and if there was one, which he doubts, he did not deliver it, for he never attempted to return to King, but went on in search of McDowell until he found him late the following day. No other officer from King got within range of Pope that night, so far as rigid investigation has ever disclosed, and that none at all came from Pope to King is beyond peradventure. Indeed, in 1878 General Pope declared it was to McDowell that all the orders were sent. General Pope also repeated this statement in a conversation with me in July, 1887, and expressed his regret that this phraseology had not been corrected in his article which appeared in The century magazine for January, 1886.--C. K. As to King's falling back to Manassas Junction, that was the result of the conference between him and his four brigade commanders, and was vehemently urged upon him as the only practica
ld Jeff, the bullets could not find me. This spirited and fear-less animal performed his duty throughout the war, and after which he. received tender care from General Jefferson and family of Seguin, Texas, until death, when he was buried with appropriate honors. When wounded I was borne to the hospital of my old division, where a most difficult operation was performed by Dr. T. G. Richardson, of New Orleans. He was at the time Chief Medical Officer of the Army of Tennessee, and is now 1878-79. the President of the Medical Association of the United States. The day after the battle I was carried upon a litter some fifteen miles to the residence of Mr. Little, in Armuchee Valley. I remained there about one month under the attentive care of Mr. and Mrs. Little, the parents of the gallant Colonel Little, of my division, and under the able medical attendance of Dr. John T. Darby. I then received intelligence from General Bragg that the enemy was contemplating a raid to capture
Benjamnin F. Butler, Butler's Book: Autobiography and Personal Reminiscences of Major-General Benjamin Butler, Chapter 18: why I was relieved from command. (search)
delbert Ames, Mackenzie,Weitzel, or Terry, or a dozen I could mention, he would have made a fine campaign on the James and helped materially in my plans. I have always been sorry that I did not do so. Butler is a man it is a fashion to abuse, but he is a man who has done to the country great service and who is worthy of its gratitude. John Russell Young's Around the world with General grant, Vol. II., p. 304. General Grant, in an interview with John Russell Young, in New York Herald, 1878, said:-- As it was, I confronted Lee, and held him and all his hosts far from Richmond and the James; while I sent, the same day of my advance across the Rapidan, a force by the James River sufficient, as I thought, to have captured all south of Richmond to Petersburg, and hold it. I believe now that if General Butler had had two corps commanders such as I might have selected, had I known the material of the entire army as well as I did afterwards, he would have done so, and would have th
Benjamnin F. Butler, Butler's Book: Autobiography and Personal Reminiscences of Major-General Benjamin Butler, Chapter 20: Congressman and Governor. (search)
hose who were not elected delegates, to cast a larger number of ballots at midnight than rightfully constituted the convention, and thus they defeated my nomination. They then declared that I never should be governor of Massachusetts. I answered that declaration of war by saying that I would be governor of Massachusetts. I then came to the conclusion that I could not be governor in the Republican party. I allowed myself to be put in nomination as an independent candidate for governor in 1878, and as such reduced the Republican majority largely. I also had the nomination of the Democratic party; but the same class of men in that party that had always opposed me in the Republican party made a bolt from the convention and ran a candidate against me, so that I was not elected, although I received a very large number of votes. In 1879, I was again candidate for governor, having the nomination of the Democratic party. The Hunker Democrats ran a bolting candidate, and I was again def
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