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Browsing named entities in Samuel Ball Platner, Thomas Ashby, A Topographical Dictionary of Ancient Rome. You can also browse the collection for 500 AD - 599 AD or search for 500 AD - 599 AD in all documents.

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Samuel Ball Platner, Thomas Ashby, A Topographical Dictionary of Ancient Rome, IUPPITER OPTIMUS MAXIMUS CAPITOLINUS, AEDES (search)
mply a graffito, carelessly read, which is restored by Reinach: Niger, Q. Regii ser(vus) (CRA 1914, 562). As Hillsen points out, however, Niger is not a slave's name, nor is Regius a gentilicium. Gaiseric removed half of the gilt tiles That Constans II removed the gilt bronze tiles in 665 A.D. is asserted by many modern authors; but there is nothing said of it in LP lxxviii. (Hilsen, Bilder aus der Geschichte des Kapitols, Rome, 1899, p. 31, n. 7). (Procop. b. Vand. i. 5), but in the sixth century it was still one of the wonders of the world (Cassiod. Var. vii. 6). In 571, however, Narses appears to have removed the statues, or many of them: Chron. Min. i. 336 (571), p. c. lustini Aug. iiii anno. De Neapolim egressus Narsis ingressus Romam et deposuit palatii eius statuam et Capitolium (see BCr 1867, 22; Hilsen cit.) The bull of Anacletus I (1130-8) refers to it as templum maius quod respicit super Alafantum (v. ELEPHAS HERBARIUS). The history of its destruction is little known
Samuel Ball Platner, Thomas Ashby, A Topographical Dictionary of Ancient Rome, MICA AUREA IN IANICULO (search)
rly mediaeval churches-SS. Cosma e Damiano de mica aurea (Jord. i. I. 69, 71 ; ii. xv.; Arm. 664-666; HCh 240) and S. Iohannes in mica aurea (Jord. ii. 343 ; Arm. 691 ; Mel. 1914, 352-356; HCh 273). It is probable that a mica aurea, something like that of Domitian (v. supra) had been built on the slope of the Janiculum between S. Cosimato and S. Pietro in Montorio, which gave its name to the immediate district and perhaps later simply to a street (Mon. L. i. 482; HJ 650; RL 1909, 151). A sixth century inscription, containing the word micaurea, may be the earliest reference to this locality, but this is very uncertain (BC 1889, 392-397, where Gatti explains mica aurea as referring to the yellow sand on the lower slope of the hill, comparing mons aureus=Montorio; Mitt. 1891, 148). Another reference is to be found on a fresco in the lower church of S. Crisogono, with the figure of one Romanus P.P. de Mica Aurea (a good deal previous to the tenth century) (BA 1914, Cr 41 sqq.; RAP ii. 165
Samuel Ball Platner, Thomas Ashby, A Topographical Dictionary of Ancient Rome, NAUMACHIA VATICANA (search)
1914, 394-5 for objections). He believes that this was the work of Trajan, to whose period the brick-facing belongs (AJA 1912, 417), perhaps a rebuilding of that of Domitian in the same or another place, and that it had been abandoned by the sixth century (Procop. BG ii. I). It would then have been one of the two naumachiae of Not.; and from it came the name regio naumachiae, which was in use as early as the sixth century (see also Durm, Baukunst 699-700; DAP 2. xv. 370-371; DuP 34; HCh 416). f Domitian in the same or another place, and that it had been abandoned by the sixth century (Procop. BG ii. I). It would then have been one of the two naumachiae of Not.; and from it came the name regio naumachiae, which was in use as early as the sixth century (see also Durm, Baukunst 699-700; DAP 2. xv. 370-371; DuP 34; HCh 416). It is generally known as circus Hadriani, but wrongly. The Hermes of the Belvedere was found in it, if the information given by Ligorio is correct (JRS 1919, 181).
Samuel Ball Platner, Thomas Ashby, A Topographical Dictionary of Ancient Rome, PALATINUS MONS (search)
to the lower slopes of the Palatine. S. Teodoro, on the north-west side, lies well above the classical level, and is constructed in the second of the three courtyards of the HORREA AGRIPPIANA (q.v.). It is mentioned in the Not. Diacon. of the sixth century. The mosaic in the apse is attributed to the sixth century (Wilpert, Mos. und Mal. 1074; cf. HCh 489). For S. Maria Antiqua, see DOMUS TIBERIANA; and for the churches on the south (S. Lucia and S. Maria in Pallara), see SEPTIZONIUM, DOMUS AUGsixth century (Wilpert, Mos. und Mal. 1074; cf. HCh 489). For S. Maria Antiqua, see DOMUS TIBERIANA; and for the churches on the south (S. Lucia and S. Maria in Pallara), see SEPTIZONIUM, DOMUS AUGUSTIANA (p. 165). For S. Cesareo, see id. (p. 164). The centre of the hill must have been rendered inaccessible by earthquakes, notably by that of the time of Leo IV; and we have practically no mention of it in the Anonymus Einsiedlensis nor in the Mirabilia. At the beginning of the sixteenth century, the Palatine, still called by its mediaeval name of Palazzo Maggiore, was covered with gardens and vineyards. Between 1540 and 1550 the whole of the north half of the hill was bought by Cardinal A
Samuel Ball Platner, Thomas Ashby, A Topographical Dictionary of Ancient Rome, AD PALMAM (search)
AD PALMAM a name that seems to have been used from the fifth or sixth century for the area between the Curia and the arch of Septimius Severus (Anom. Vales. 66 in Chron. Min. i. 324 (517 A.D.): venit ad senatum et ad Palmam populo adlocutus; Acta S. Restituti AA. SS. May 29, c. 12). This area had previously been called TRIA FATA (q.v.), and was undoubtedly identical with the Palma Aurea of Fulgentius (Acta S. Fulgentii AA. SS. Jan. vol. i. p. 37, c. 13: in loco qui palma aurea dicitur). The DOMUS PALMATA (q.v.) has been wrongly placed here (BC 1887, 64-66) : see supra, 187 and add.
Samuel Ball Platner, Thomas Ashby, A Topographical Dictionary of Ancient Rome, PAX, TEMPLUM (search)
ceeding centuries as one of the most magnificent buildings in the city (Herod. i. 14. 2; Amm. Marcell. xvi. 10. 14; Hist. Aug. trig. tyr. 31. 10). It gave its name to the fourth region of the city (Not. Reg. IV). In 408 there were seismic disturbances for seven successive days in the forum Pacis (Marcell. Comes, Chron. min. ed. Mommsen ii. 69: in foro Pacis per dies septem terra mugitum dedit), and the temple may have been injured then. At any rate Procopius (BG iv. 21), writing in the sixth century, says that it had long since been destroyed by lightning, although there were still many works of art set up in the immediate vicinity. The enclosure within which the temple stood is not called forum in literature until after the time of Constantine. Enclosure and temple together appear in Pliny (xxxvi. 27) as Pacis opera, and in the Greek writers aste/menos *ei)rh/nhs(see above). Forum Pacis is found in Ammianus, Polemius Silvius and Marcellinus Comes (locc. citt.),fo/ron *ei)rh/nhsin
Samuel Ball Platner, Thomas Ashby, A Topographical Dictionary of Ancient Rome, PORTA AURELIA (1) (search)
PORTA AURELIA (1) the modern Porta S. Pancrazio, a gate in the Aurelian wall on the summit of the Janiculum, through which the VIA AURELIA (q.v.) issued. The original name occurs in DMH and later documents (Eins. 7. i; Mirab. 4), but by the sixth century it was also called Pancratiana and Transtiberina (Procop. BG 18. 35; 23. 12; 28. 19) from the neighbouring church of S. Pancratius (Porta Aurelia, quae modo porta Sancti Pancratii dictum, GMU 88, R. ii. 408). The original structure This is, of course, shown in all the plans and bird's-eye views of the city previous to 1644, but no detailed drawing of it is known. was replaced by Urban VIII in 1644 (Jord. i. I. 375; T ix. 465-466) and this, after being damaged in the siege of 1849, was removed, and the modern gate erected.
Samuel Ball Platner, Thomas Ashby, A Topographical Dictionary of Ancient Rome, PORTA LATINA (search)
PORTA LATINA a gate in the Aurelian wall through which passed the VIA LATINA (q.v.) (DMH). It has a single arch (Ill. 40) of irregular blocks of travertine, with a row of five windows above on the outside, and a sixth in brick, at the south end, surmounted by stone battlements, and flanked by two semi-circular towers of brick-faced concrete (almost entirely rebuilt), which do not rise above the top of the central section. The north tower rests on a foundation of masonry which may have belonged to a tomb (PBS iv. 13). Most of the structure dates from Honorius, including the voussoirs of the arch; though they are often (wrongly) attributed to a restoration of the sixth century, because a cross and circle is sculptured on the inner keystone, and on the outer the monogram of Christ between A and Q. It retained its name throughout the Middle Ages (T ii. 18-24; xi. 6-10; Jord. i. I. 366 ; Reber 537; ZA 320; BC 1927, 57).
Samuel Ball Platner, Thomas Ashby, A Topographical Dictionary of Ancient Rome, PORTA OSTIENSIS (search)
PORTA OSTIENSIS a gate in the Aurelian wall through which passed the VIA OSTIENSIS (q.v.) (Amm. Marcell. xvii. 4. 12-the obelisk now at the Lateran 'per Ostiensem portam piscinamque publicam circo illatus est Naximo '-DMH). It had acquired the name which it still bears, under the modern form Porta S. Paolo, as early as the sixth century (Procop. BG ii. 4. 3, 9; iii. 36:pu/lh h( *pau/lou tou= a)p\osto/lou e)pw/numo/s e)sti ; Aethicus, p. 716 Gronov. (83 Riese): Ostiensem portam quae est domni Pauli apostoli). It seems to be mentioned as porta Latina by Magister Gregorius, who describes what should be the pyramid of Cestius in conjunction with it (JRS 1919, 20, 46, 56). It is probable that, like the porta Appia and the porta Flaminia, it originally had a double arch; and this explains why there are two arches of travertine side by side in the inner gateway (Ill. 41), which belongs to a later restoration, as Aurelian does not appear to have constructed any of his gates with courtya
Samuel Ball Platner, Thomas Ashby, A Topographical Dictionary of Ancient Rome, PORTA PRAENESTINA (search)
us; cf. Gell and Nibby, Mura di Roma, 349, and pl. xiv. changed it very considerably: he certainly built a curtain wall with two openings (on the right-hand one was CIL vi. 1189), thus forming a courtyard. With this building scheme seem to go the square towers at each end on the outside; while the semicircular tower in the middle over the tomb of Eurysaces may belong to Aurelian. The latest ancient road level is 1.50 m. below the modern. The right-hand opening was blocked at a later date (Ill. 38). In 1838 these fourth-century additions were removed and the arches of the aqueduct exposed to view (Jord. i. I. 357; Reber 528-532; PBS i. 500). The gate appears in the sixth century (Procop. BG i. 18), when we have our first record of it, as the porta Praenestina. This name continued in use during the Middle Ages, along with Sessoriana and Labicana, but gradually gave way to Maior, which has survived in its modern designation (T x. 380-383; DuP 92-93; D'Esp. Fr. i. 8 ; BC 1917, 195-207).
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