hide Matching Documents

The documents where this entity occurs most often are shown below. Click on a document to open it.

Document Max. Freq Min. Freq
View all matching documents...

Your search returned 18 results in 18 document sections:

1 2
A Dictionary of Greek and Roman biography and mythology (ed. William Smith), (search)
Latera'nus, Plau'tius was one of the lovers of Messallina, the wife of the emperor Claudius, and was in consequence condemned to death by the emperor in A. D. 48; but pardoned, says Tacitus, on account of the brilliant services of his uncle, by whom the historian probably means A. Plautius, the conqueror of Britain. Lateranus was deprived of his rank as a senator, to which, however, he was restored on the accession of Nero, in A. D. 56. Ten years afterwards (A. D. 66), although consul elect, he took part in the celebrated conspiracy of Piso against Nero, actuated, says the historian, by no private wrongs, but by love for the state. He met death with the greatest firmness, refusing to disclose the names of any of the conspirators, and not even upbraiding the tribune, who executed him in the place where slaves were put to death, with being privy to the conspiracy, though such was the case. The first blow not severing his head from his body, he calmly stretched it out again. (Tac. Ann. 1
A Dictionary of Greek and Roman biography and mythology (ed. William Smith), (search)
Ma'ncia, Curti'lius was legatus of the army on the upper Rhine, in the reign of Nero, and assisted Dubius Avitus, praefect of Gaul and lower Germany, in putting down the league of the Tenctheri, Bructeri, and Ampsivarii, against the Romans, A. D. 56-59. (Tac. Ann. 13.56; Phlegon, de Admir. 27.) [W.B.D]
A Dictionary of Greek and Roman biography and mythology (ed. William Smith), (search)
he embraced with ardour the Stoic philosophy. So distinguished did he become for his virtue and nobleness of soul, that when quaestor he was chosen by Thrasea Paetus as his son-in-law; and by this connection he was still further strengthened in his love of liberty. He was quaestor in Achaia during the reign of Nero, and by the way in which he discharged the duties of his office, gained the love of the provincials. (Comp. Schol. ad Juv. 5.36.) Having obtained the tribuneship of the plebs in A. D. 56, he exerted his influence to protect the poor against the severe proceedings of Obultronius Sabinus, the quaestor of the treasury. The name of Priscus is not mentioned again for a few years. His freedom of speech and love of independence could not prove pleasing to the court, and he, therefore, was not advanced to any of the higher offices of the state. It appears that he and his fatherin-law were even imprudent enough to celebrate in their houses republican festivals, and to commemorate th
A Dictionary of Greek and Roman biography and mythology (ed. William Smith), (search)
Quirina'lis, Clo'dius praefectus of the rowers at Ravenna, anticipated his condemnation by taking poison, A. D. 56. (Tac. Ann. 13.30.)
A Dictionary of Greek and Roman biography and mythology (ed. William Smith), (search)
Saturni'nus, Volu'sius 2. L. Volusius Saturninus, son of the preceding, was consul suffectus, A. D. 3. He died in the reign of Nero, A. D. 56, at the age of ninety-three, having survived all the persons who were members of the senate during his consulship. It appears from Pliny that he was praefect of the city at the time of his death. The great wealth which he had inherited from his father he still further increased by economy. (Tac. Ann. 13.30, 14.56; Plin. Nat. 7.12. s. 14, 7.48. s. 49, 11.3. s. 90.)
A Dictionary of Greek and Roman biography and mythology (ed. William Smith), (search)
Saturni'nus, Volu'sius 3. Q. Volusius Saturninus, son of the preceding, was consul in A. D. 56, with P. Cornelius Scipio. His father was upwards of sixty-two years of age when he was born : his mother was a Cornelia of the family of the Scipios. He was one of three commissioners who took the census of the Gauls, in A. D. 61. (Plin. Nat. 7.12. s. 14; Tac. Ann. 13.25, 14.46.)
Sci'pio 36. P. Cornelius Scipio, perhaps the son of 34, was the husband of Poppaea Sabina, who was put to death by Messalina, the wife of the emperor Claudius. He did not venture to express any disapprobation of the deed, and showed his subserviency at a later period by proposing in the senate that thanks should be returned to Pallas, the freedman of Claudius, because he allowed himself to be regarded as one of the servants of the emperor, although he was descended from the kings of Arcadia. He was consul under Nero in A. D. 56, with L. Volusius Saturninus, who was probably his first cousin. (Tac. Ann. 11.2, 4, 12.53, 13.25; Plin. Nat. 7.12. s. 14.) The lives of the Scipios are given with accuracy by Haakh in the Real-Encyclop├Ądie der classichen Alterthumswissenschaft, to which we have been much indebted in drawing up the previous account.
A Dictionary of Greek and Roman biography and mythology (ed. William Smith), (search)
Sosia'nus, Anti'stius was tribune of the plebs, A. D. 56, and praetor, A. D. 62. In the latter year he was banished for having written libellous verses against Nero, but was recalled to Rome in A. D. 66, in consequence of his having brought an accusation against Anteius. He was, however, again banished at the commencement of Nero's reign as one of the informers under the tyrant. (Tac. Ann. 13.28, 14.48, 16.14, Hist. 4.44.)
1 2