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Louisiana Banks. --We copy the following statement of the Louisiana Banks from the New Orleans Crescent of Monday: Comparative statement for two weeks. June 29.July 6. Specie15, 186,99115,215,229Inc..133,238 Circulation6,610,3086,780,4.6Inc..170,101 Deposits15,744,4415,347,858Dec..396,1 Short Loans9,795,7409,642,91Dec.153,448 Exchange4,168,0314,051,730Dec.116,001 Due dis. Bank.76,978758,232Dec. 8,646 Long and Short Loans, June 29$19,543,318 Long and Short Loans July 619,2ana Banks. --We copy the following statement of the Louisiana Banks from the New Orleans Crescent of Monday: Comparative statement for two weeks. June 29.July 6. Specie15, 186,99115,215,229Inc..133,238 Circulation6,610,3086,780,4.6Inc..170,101 Deposits15,744,4415,347,858Dec..396,1 Short Loans9,795,7409,642,91Dec.153,448 Exchange4,168,0314,051,730Dec.116,001 Due dis. Bank.76,978758,232Dec. 8,646 Long and Short Loans, June 29$19,543,318 Long and Short Loans July 619,222,452
The Pritzes captured by the Confederate steamer Sumter released by the Spanish authorities --A telegraphic dispatch dated Boston, July 15, says: Captain White, of the bark Louisa Kelham, one of the vessels captured by the Confederate steamer Sumter, writes to the owners that he was captured July 6, the day he sailed from Cienfuegos, with 550 tons of sugar, shipped on Spanish account, and bound for Falmouth, England, for orders. He also states that it is the opinion of the Governor here that the Spanish laws won't let him (the Sumter) hold us. We expect to hear from Havana to-day. A letter from Messrs. Calmsac & Bros., at Havana, dated July 10th, says the prizes are now in the port of Cienfuegos, but would not be allowed to remain there. No more American vessels can at present find a charter from this island. Of course this caused a great excitement among American shipmasters. Another letter, dated Havana 10th, states positively that the Spanish authorities hav
The Daily Dispatch: July 19, 1861., [Electronic resource], Unfortunate occurrence--five persons Drowsed. (search)
Outrageous conduct. --On Thursday last, as the steamer J. C. Swon, with German soldiers from Cape Girardeau, was passing the little town of Preston, on the Mississippi river, in this county, a large number of the soldiers commenced firing with Minnie rifles into the town, and kept up the unaccountable firing as long as the boat was in reach. Although the steamer was nearly three-quarters of a mile from the shore, the whistling of the bullets could be distinctly heard by those in the town, and the limbs were cut off a number of shade trees. Fortunately no one was hurt, but several of the Minnie balls were picked up in the street after the occurrence. This conduct on the part of the soldiers is perfectly unaccountable, as not the slightest indignity was offered to the boat by any one, nor have we heard any imputation of the disloyalty of the town's people.--Jonesboro' (Ill.) Gaz.,July 6.
on that coast. The Herald's Newport correspondent gives the following account of the privateer's operations: Capture of the brig John Welsh. The John Welsh, Capt. Fifield, left Trinidad, Cuba, on the 22d of June, for Falmouth, England, having on board a cargo of 300 hogsheads and 475 boxes of sugar. She is owned in Philadelphia, principally by John Welsh, Esq., after whom she is named, and was chartered in Trinidad by a Spanish firm, the owners of the sugar. The voyage until Saturday, July 6, was made without the occurrence of any noteworthy incident, when, about 6 o'clock on the morning of that day, and while the vessel was off Hatteras, and a little to the east of the Gulf Stream, a brig was discovered ahead, showing French colors. The Welsh, supposing this signal to exhibit a wish on the part of the stranger to speak her, the American flag was run up in response, seeing which the brig altered her course to leeward, crossed the bows of the Welsh, and when near the latter
The Daily Dispatch: August 9, 1861., [Electronic resource], Outrages committed by the "Grand Army" in Fairfax county. (search)
Outrages committed by the "Grand Army" in Fairfax county. Fairfax C. H., Va., July 6. To the Editors of the Dispatch: Though full details of our recent glorious victories over the army of the so-called United States have been given to the public, I have seen no published account of the depredations committed by these Hessians on their march and retreat through this county. To mention each individual case would fill space too great for your columns. Never in the annals of the world did an invading army commit acts more horrible than did these hordes of the North. The house of Mr. Albert T. Willcoxon, a brick building recently erected and fitted up in handsome style, was entered by them, the window glass and sash almost entirely demolished, the doors torn from their hinges, the stair banister broken down, and the furniture not removed split to pieces. So with the handsome residence of Thos. R. Love, Esq., adjoining the village. Embraced in his loss, in addition, was a
her. On the Fourth of July, a salute in honor of the Confederate flag was fired, after which all hands, by order of Capt. Coxetter, "splice the main brace" In the evening, a sail was discovered on the Ice bow. On approaching this vessel a gun was fired, which caused he to heave to. On examination of her papers she was found to be the brig Grace Worthington, sailing under English colors. She was let pass. A brig from Baltimore was also allowed to pass on the same day. On Saturday,July 6 a vessel was descried The Jeff Davis hoisted French colors, which brought the sail towards her. The Captain of the unknown vessel, thinking the Jeff. wanted the longitude, came close by, and was in the act of giving the longitude, when "Lon, Tom," from Capt. Coxetter, changed the appearance of matters, and brought the John Welsh to. (The John Welsh, with her cargo of sugar, has since safely arrived) The John Welsh was bound from Trinidad to Falmouth for orders. The next vessel captured
The John Adams Homeward bound. --The U. S. sloop-of-war John Adams sailed from Hong Kong, July 6th, for New York. She brings home the captain, first officer and crew of the American ship Saracen, which vessel arrived at Hong Kong about three months before, and afterwards departed on her return to the United States. The captain of the Saracen is charged with the murder of one of his crew.
ting all the Union men they could catch through the entire country. A man who was out on a scout the other evening, tells me that he approached near the encampment of the rebels near Charleston, that he got within the picket lines, and was able to see a large crowd of the rebels — not less, he thinks, than 1,500. He saw some of the rebels go to two houses in the neighborhood and carry off blankets, quilts, and a store of honey. Mr. D. B. Rhodes, of Ripley, who was taken on the 6th of July, has been in jail in Salem, on the Tennessee and Lynchburg railroad, for ten weeks. He was released on the 4th inst., and has since traveled over a hundred miles through the enemy's country. He says he met Col. Wood, of the Secession army, about a mile from Hawk's Nest, and that he counted 500 tents. The 36th Ohio had sent out a command on a foraging scout. They brought in 100 head of cattle, taken from John J. Dickinson, who was claimed to be a Secessionist. Important movement
for obvious reasons. But if the nations of the earth put it out of our power to pursue this course, is it generous to find fault with us because we do not pursue it? To show you the earnests desire which I had in the beginning of my cruiser to send my prizes in for adjudication rather than take the responsibility of sitting in judgment on them myself I send you enclosed a copy of a letter which I addressed to the Governor of the town of Cienfuegos, in the Island of Cuba, as early as the 6th of July last. This letter will explain itself, and I have only to remark with reference to it, that I had not at its date seen the Spanish proclamation. I rely upon your sense of justice to give place in your columns both to this communication and the letter. R. Semmes, Commander. Confederate States Navy. C. S. Steamer Sumter. Gibraltar, Jan. 29, 1862 The British Parliament. In the House of Lords on the 7th inst. the Earl of Carnarvon was anxious to ascertain the truth, or rat
Berkeley, from 12 to half past 1. Dense columns of smoke were seen arising. Subsequently the gunboat Monitor and another passed up above City Point, shelling the woods frequently as they progressed. The Tribune, of the 28th ult., has been received it states that the killed, wounded, and missing at the fight near Charleston was 688. Gen. Benham was placed under arrest for making the attack. He and his staff have reached New York. The fight caused a decline in stocks. Petersburg, July 6.--The Yankees have buried over 500 of their dead at Shirley, and left over 100 wounded, who fell into our hands. Our pickets now occupy Shirley. Nine more prisoners have been brought to Petersburg. They say that McClellan was in a strong position at Berkeley, that he has been reinforced by Shields's division, has 80 to 100,000 men, and will give battle. Balloons were sent up yesterday and to-day. The wagon train is still visible, and the tents of the enemy dot the country for mi
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