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Jubal Anderson Early, Ruth Hairston Early, Lieutenant General Jubal A. Early , C. S. A., Index. (search)
Index. Aaronsburg, 263 Abbottstown, 264 Abingdon, 466 Abraham's Creek, 242, 420, 421, 423 Adams, Captain, 188 Aquia Creek, 15, 31, 104, 105, 168 Aquia District, 51 Alabama Troops, 3, 21, 27, 51, 60, 61, 162, 185, 192, 468 Alexandria, 2, 39, 44, 45, 48, 75, 118, 131 Alleghany County, 459 Alleghany Mountains, 338, 366 Altodale, 254 Alum Spring Mill, 224, 225, 227, 230 Anderson, General, 68, 105, 132, 135, 147, 149, 151, 152, 155, 156, 158, 159, 163, 196, 198, 211, 212, 216, 227, 231, 234, 236, 322, 323, 324, 352, 362, 363, 364, 404, 407, 408, 409,410, 411, 412, 413 Andersonville, 297, 298 Andrews, Colonel, 197, 199, 206, 211, 220, 221, 222, 224, 323 Antietam, 139, 140, 143, 150, 151, 156, 161, 384, 385, 403 Antietam Creek, 140 Appomattox Court-House, 191 Archer, General, 170, 172, 173, 174, 175 Arendtsville, 264 Arkansas, 468 Arlington Heights, 41 Armistead, General, 83, 84, 149, 153, 156 Army of Northern Virgini
Fitzhugh Lee, General Lee, Chapter 11: Chancellorsville. (search)
dest as he was daring, was next in rank to Hill, but in a conference with Major Pendleton, Jackson's chief of staff, and some of the general officers, quickly acquiesced in a suggestion that General J. E. B. Stuart be sent for, because he was satisfied the good of the service demanded it. Stuart was at Ely's Ford with the cavalry and Sixteenth North Carolina Infantry, having gone there to watch Averell, who, having returned from his raid, was reported to be at that point. At 10.30 P. M. Captain Adams, of Hill's staff, summoned him to the command of Jackson's corps. Upon Stuart's arrival upon the battlefield, Jackson had been taken to the rear, but A. P. Hill, still there, turned over the command to him. With the assistance of Colonel E. P. Alexander, of the artillery, he was engaged all night in preparations for the morrow. At early dawn on the 3d Stuart pressed the corps forward-Hill's division in the first line, Trimble's in the second, and Rodes's in the rear. As the sun lif
Ulysses S. Grant, Personal Memoirs of U. S. Grant, Sherman's campaign in Georgia-siege of Atlanta --death of General McPherson-attempt to capture Andersonville-capture of Atlanta (search)
; but encountering afterwards a largely superior force of the enemy he was obliged to drop his prisoners and get back as best he could with what men he had left. He had lost several hundred men out of his small command. On the 4th of August Colonel Adams, commanding a little brigade of about a thousand men, returned reporting Stoneman and all but himself as lost. I myself had heard around Richmond of the capture of Stoneman, and had sent Sherman word, which he received. The rumor was confirmed there, also, from other sources. A few days after Colonel Adams's return Colonel [Horace] Capron also got in with a small detachment and confirmed the report of the capture of Stoneman with something less than a thousand men. The Atlanta campaign It seems that Stoneman, finding the escape of all his force was impossible, had made arrangements for the escape of two divisions. He covered the movement of these divisions to the rear with a force of about seven hundred men, and at len
J. B. Jones, A Rebel War Clerk's Diary, XXII. January, 1863 (search)
aswell, below Wilmington, has been casemated with iron; but can it withstand elongated balls weighing 480 pounds? I fear not. There are, however, submarine batteries; yet these may be avoided, for Gen. Whiting writes that the best pilot (one sent thither some time ago by the enemy) escaped to the hostile fleet since Gen. Smith visited North Carolina, which is embraced within his command. This pilot, no doubt, knows the location of all our torpedoes. Nothing further from Savannah. Mr. Adams, the United States Minister at London, writes to Mr. Seward, Secretary of State, dated 17th of October, 1862, that if the Federal army shall not achieve decisive successes by the month of February ensuing, it is probable the British Parliament will recognize the Confederate States. To-morrow is the last day of January. I cut the following from yesterday's Dispatch: The results of extortion and speculation. The state of affairs brought about by the speculating and extortion pract
Abraham Lincoln, Stephen A. Douglas, Debates of Lincoln and Douglas: Carefully Prepared by the Reporters of Each Party at the times of their Delivery., Fourth joint debate, at Charleston, September 18, 1858. (search)
on of the United States. There you find that we took it for granted that the Constitution was to be submitted to the people, whether the bill was silent on the subject or not. Suppose I had reported it so, following the example of Washington, Adams, Jefferson, Madison Monroe, Adams, Jackson, Van Buren, Harrison, Tyler, Polk, Taylor, Fillmore, and Pierce, would that fact have been evidence of a conspiracy to force a Constitution upon the people of Kansas against their will? If the charge whAdams, Jackson, Van Buren, Harrison, Tyler, Polk, Taylor, Fillmore, and Pierce, would that fact have been evidence of a conspiracy to force a Constitution upon the people of Kansas against their will? If the charge which Mr. Lincoln makes be true against me, it is true against Zachary Taylor, Millard Fillmore, and every Whig President, as well as every Democratic President, and against Henry Clay, who, in the Senate or House, for forty years advocated bills similar to the one I reported, no one of them containing a clause compelling the submission of the Constitution to the people. Are Mr. Lincoln and Mr. Trumbull prepared to charge upon all those eminent men from the beginning of the Government down to th
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 4. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Battle of Chancellorsville-report of Major-General Stuart. (search)
performed with great skill and address. The attack was thus, in a measure, a surprise. The enemy's line of entrenchments was carried, and his legions driven in confusion from the field. It was already dark when I sought Gen. Jackson, and proposed, as there appeared nothing else for me to do, to take some cavalry and infantry over and hold the Ely's ford. He approved the proposition, and I had already gained the heights overlooking the ford, where was a large number of camp fires, when Capt. Adams, of Gen. A. P. Hill's staff reached me post haste, and informed me of the sad calamities which for the time deprived the troops of the leadership of both Jackson and Hill, and the urgent demand for me to come and take command as quickly as possible. I rode with rapidity back five miles, determined to press the pursuit already so gloriously begun. Gen. Jackson had gone to the rear, but Gen. A. P. Hill was still on the ground, and formally turned over the command to me. I sent also a sta
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 5. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Battle of Murfreesboro. (search)
les from Murfreesboroa in the following order: Adams' brigade on the right, with its right resting the Nashville turnpike; Preston on the left of Adams; Palmer on the left of Preston, and Hanson for, a little in advance of the right of Brigadier-General Adams. My division formed the front lincomb's Washington Artillery. At the same time Adams' brigade was moved from the right and formed o see at a distance the brigades of Jackson and Adams recoiling from a very hot fire of the enemy. of Generals Bragg and Polk, to rally and form Adams' brigade, which was falling back chiefly betwerage and determination of these troops. General Adams having received a wound while gallantly le join his brigade (Preston's). The brigades of Adams and Preston, which were left on the west side w on the right. Preston supported Pillow, and Adams' brigade (commanded by Colonel Gibson) supportort of Colonel R. L. Gibson. headquarters Adams' brigade, Breckinridge's division, Hardee's co[4 more...]
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 5. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Report of Colonel Gibson of operations of Adams' brigade. (search)
Report of Colonel Gibson of operations of Adams' brigade. headquarters Adams' brigade, Breckinridge's division, Hardee's corps,near Tullahoma, Tenn., January 24th, 1863. Colonel T. O'Hara, A. A. G.: Sir: On Friday, January 2d, while in command of Adams' brigade, I was ordered from the cedar brake on the left, where I was Adams' brigade, Breckinridge's division, Hardee's corps,near Tullahoma, Tenn., January 24th, 1863. Colonel T. O'Hara, A. A. G.: Sir: On Friday, January 2d, while in command of Adams' brigade, I was ordered from the cedar brake on the left, where I was reporting to Brigadier-General Preston, commanding division of two brigades, to report to Major-General Breckinridge, our division commander, on the right of Stone river. I was placed in position by yourself, about one hundred and fifty yards in the rear of Brigadier-General Hanson's brigade, as a supporting line in the charge to Adams' brigade, I was ordered from the cedar brake on the left, where I was reporting to Brigadier-General Preston, commanding division of two brigades, to report to Major-General Breckinridge, our division commander, on the right of Stone river. I was placed in position by yourself, about one hundred and fifty yards in the rear of Brigadier-General Hanson's brigade, as a supporting line in the charge to be made. In obedience to orders from General Breckinridge, I posted a reserve, consisting of the Thirty-second Alabama, Colonel McKinstry, and a battalion of Louisiana sharpshooters, Major Austin, under the command of Colonel Mc-Kinstry, in the position occupied by the second line when formed originally. These dispositions ha
resident's absence, by pinching Mr. Stanton's ears and twitching Mr. Welles's beard. He soon returned, but it was some time before harmony was restored, for the mishaps to the secretaries caused such bursts of laughter that the influence was very unpropitious. For some half-hour the demonstrations were of a physical character — tables were moved, and the picture of Henry Clay, which hangs on the wall, was swayed more than a foot, and two candelabras, presented by the Dey of Algiers to President Adams, were twice raised nearly to the ceiling. It was nearly nine o'clock before Shockle was fully under spiritual influence, and so powerful were the subsequent manifestations, that twice during the evening restoratives were applied, for he was much weakened; and though I took no notes, I shall endeavor to give you as faithful an account as possible of what took place. Loud rappings, about nine o'clock, were heard directly beneath the President's feet, and Mr. Shockle stated that an I
d, It waved over conquered Burgoyne. Though it trembled at times to the tempest, And clouds o'er its blazonry passed, Our eagle thence wafted it onward, Till proudly 'twas planted at last. And now, as we gaze on its splendors, In the heart what starred memories rise I Of worthies with feet in our pathways, But glorified brows in the skies. High lifted — the foremost among them-- Our Nation's great Father is seen, With figure in mould so majestic, And face so benign and serene. And Jefferson, Adams, and Franklin There shine in the stately array; And there the wreathed forehead of Jackson, And there the grand presence of Clay. And battle-fields, trophied in honor, On the breast of the banner are rife-- The evergreen summit of Bunker, And Trenton's wild winter-tossed strife. And proudly our own Saratoga, Where the first of our triumphs was won And Yorktown — that height of our glory, Where burst our victorious sun. Then, hail to our sky-blazoned banner! It has brightened the shore and th
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