hide Matching Documents

The documents where this entity occurs most often are shown below. Click on a document to open it.

Document Max. Freq Min. Freq
View all matching documents...

Your search returned 178 results in 20 document sections:

1 2
ther side of Bull Run the Confederates under Beauregard had taken their stand with the stream as a cvance with his raw and unorganized troops on Beauregard at Manassas. The plan for the battle which a good part of his troops had already joined Beauregard at Manassas. After the defeat McDowell was General Scott were to send McDowell against Beauregard, while Patterson was to detain Johnston in tns to attack the Confederate left wing, Generals Beauregard and Johnston were planning an aggressive east the Confederates under Longstreet and Beauregard on the western bank. By this attack McDowel A charge of fresh troops brought forward by Beauregard in person in the late afternoon started the e fireplace of the McLean house deprived General Beauregard of his dinner. weak Confederate left w ranks of the Union army. Meanwhile, Generals Beauregard and Johnston had remained at the right as since been known as Stonewall Jackson. Beauregard and Johnston found it a herculean task to ra[18 more...]
e him had been withdrawn by the order of General Beauregard. To his men working their way up the slssippi. Next in command to Johnston was General Beauregard who fought at Bull Run, and who had come that was yielded on the field of Shiloh. Beauregard succeeded to the command on the fall of Johnoats in the river, the charge was repulsed. Beauregard then gave orders to desist from further atta army. When the messenger informed him of Beauregard's order, he inquired if he had already deliv losing all that they had gained. Moreover, Beauregard's army, with its long, muddy march from Corifore. There is every reason to believe that Beauregard would have won a signal victory if neither aicers of the Fourth Kentucky Cavalry General Beauregard made his headquarters. Hour after hour or another horse. Early in the afternoon, Beauregard became convinced that he was fighting a losite and vigorous pursuit, could have captured Beauregard's entire army. But he and all his advisers
Island No.10 was situated at the upper bend of a great double curve of the Mississippi, about forty miles below Columbus. It had been strongly fortified by General Beauregard, but Beauregard was called to Corinth and Shiloh and he turned the command over to General Mackall with about seven thousand men. It was confidently believeBeauregard was called to Corinth and Shiloh and he turned the command over to General Mackall with about seven thousand men. It was confidently believed by its defenders that this fortified island would be the final stopping place of all hostile vessels on the great river, that none could pass it without being blown out of the water by the powerful batteries. The retreat down the river. The Flag-ship of the Confederate Fleet at Island No.10.--Below the dreaded battery and they did on March 17th. On that day they trained their guns on the island; for nine long hours the boom of cannon was continuous. The results were slight. Beauregard, who had not yet departed for Corinth, wired to Richmond that his batteries were not damaged and but one man was killed. General Pope was sorely in need of a
ice --accidentally struck by her consort General Beauregard at the battle of Memphis, run ashore, anh most of his army to Shiloh and Corinth, as Beauregard had been before, and the gunboats with a smalower picture. Secure in the knowledge that Beauregard's presence with a large force at Corinth hadn after this the Queen was rammed by the General Beauregard and a little later when the Beauregard aBeauregard and the General Price were making for the Monarch, the Beauregard missed her aim and struck her comraBeauregard missed her aim and struck her comrade, the General Price, tearing off her wheel and putting her out of service. The Queen fought with lmost impossible. after her crash with the Beauregard, and Ellet ordered that she be headed for thng a great hole beneath the water line. The Beauregard, disabled also by the gunboats, began to siner day's work by doing a deed of mercy. The Beauregard was still above water, but was settling rapie Monarch rescued them and towed the sinking Beauregard to shallow water, where she sank to her boil[2 more...]
The Photographic History of The Civil War: in ten volumes, Thousands of Scenes Photographed 1861-65, with Text by many Special Authorities, Volume 1: The Opening Battles. (ed. Francis Trevelyan Miller), Engagements of the Civil War with losses on both sides December, 1860-August, 1862 (search)
, 37th N. Y., 4th Me., 2 cos. 1st N. Y. Cav., Randolph's and Thompson's Batteries U. S. Art. Confed., outposts of Gen. Beauregard's command. Losses: Union 3 killed, 1 wounded. November 23, 1861: Ft. Pickens, Pensacola, Fla. Union, Cospril 29, 1862 to June 10, 1862: siege of Corinth, Miss. Union, Gen. Halleck's Army. Confed., Army commanded by Gen. Beauregard. May, 1862. May 1, 1862: Camp Creek, W. Va. Union, Co. C., 23d Ohio. Confed., Detachment 8th Va. Cav. 4 wounded. May 17, 1862: in front of Corinth, Miss. Union, Gen. M. L. Smith's Brigade. Confed., Outposts of Gen. Beauregard's army. Losses: Union 10 killed, 31 wounded. Confed. 12 killed. May 19, 1862: Searcy Landing, Ark. Unound. Losses: Confed. 2,000 prisoners. May 30, 1862: Corinth, Miss. Evacuation by Confederate army under Gen. Beauregard. Occupation by Union troops of Gen. Halleck's command. End of siege begun April 29. Losses: (No detailed rep
re he led. upon the struggle, then in its very inception. In that fiery baptism, a man still unknown to fame was to receive, at the hands of a gallant soldier about to surrender his soul to the Maker who gave it, the name which, to the world, was to supplant that conferred by his natural sponsors, and by which he will ever be known as among the great captains of his race and of history. The supreme effort of the Federal commander was directed against the left of the army of Johnston and Beauregard and upon the open plateau surrounding the Henry house. The battle was raging furiously, and seemingly the Southern line at that Point was on the verge of utter disaster, when the Carolinian, General Barnard E. Bee, rode from his shattered and wavering brigade over to where Jackson still held fast with his mountain men. General, he said in tones of anguish, they are beating us back. no, sir, was the grim reply; we will give them the bayonet. Bee rode back and spoke to his brigade: l
essee, Confederate generals full rank Beauregard and Johnston All the officers who held thong those killed in battle. Pierre Gustave Toutant Beauregard Beauregard received the SurreBeauregard received the Surrender of the First Federal Citadel—Fort Sumter; fought in Defense of the Last Confederate Citadel-thebout fifty-five thousand. General Pierre Gustave Toutant Beauregard (U. S.M. A. 1838) was borwith it. After the latter's death at Shiloh, Beauregard remained at the head of the army until after volunteer Confederate forces under Brigadier-General Beauregard into the First Corps, Army of the PStephen Dill Lee fought in five States; with Beauregard at Charleston, April, 1861, and with Hood atith General Johnston in command and General P. G. T. Beauregard second. Lieutenant-General Simonississippi on March 5, 1862, and to General P. G. T. Beauregard was given the command. The army wain South Carolina. James Chestnut, aide to Beauregard at Fort Sumter. Johnson Hagood, defender [3 more...]<
The Photographic History of The Civil War: in ten volumes, Thousands of Scenes Photographed 1861-65, with Text by many Special Authorities, Volume 10: The Armies and the Leaders. (ed. Francis Trevelyan Miller), General officers of the Confederate Army: a full roster compiled from the official records (search)
ommands, and fully justified, were never legally confirmed. In such cases, as those of Joseph Wheeler and John B. Gordon, General Wright has followed the strictest interpretation of the Confederate records below. As for the body of this History it has been thought best to employ the titles most commonly used, and found in the popular reference works. The highest rank attained is given in every case together with the date of the commission conferring such rank. Generals, regular Beauregard, P. G. T., July 21, 1861. Bragg, Braxton, April 6, 1862. Cooper, Samuel, May 16, 1861. Johnston, A. S., May 30, 1861. Johnston, J. E., July 4, 1861. Lee, Robert E., June 14, 1861. General, provisional army Smith, E. Kirby, Feb. 19, 1864. Generals, provisional army (with temporary rank) Hood, John B., July 18, 1864. Lieutenant-generals, provisional army Buckner, S. B., Sept. 20, 1864. Ewell, Richard S., May 23, 1863. Forrest, N. B., Feb. 28, 1865. Hampton, Wade, Feb. 14, 1
read, by the flash of his eyes, that he meant what he said. If, as we firmly believe, traits of character, scope of mind, even tastes and prejudices, can be transmitted from generation to generation, we can understand how and why Pierre Gustave Toutant Beauregard displayed the capacity for command and the inspiring influence which so distinguished him during our four years war, when we glance back over the long line of his ancestors, where, love of liberty and soldierly qualities were so conished him during our four years war, when we glance back over the long line of his ancestors, where, love of liberty and soldierly qualities were so conspicuous. We very much mistake, or there is still a goodly current of the Celtic Tider's blood running through General Beauregard's veins, and the high-toned chivalric courtesy, coupled with irreproachable integrity, so remarkable in him, must certainly be derived from the stately old Dukes of Reggio and Modena, the heads of the House of Este.
Military operations of General Beauregard. Chapter 1: Major Beauregard appointed Superintendent of the United States military Academy. his determination to resign should Louisiana withdraw from the Union. takes command at West point, but is immediately relieved.–Returns to New Orleans. is offered the rank of ColonMajor Beauregard appointed Superintendent of the United States military Academy. his determination to resign should Louisiana withdraw from the Union. takes command at West point, but is immediately relieved.–Returns to New Orleans. is offered the rank of Colonel of Engineers and artillery in the Louisiana State forces, Declines. plan to obstruct river near Forts. floating booms. is summoned to Montgomery by President Davis. ordered to Charleston, S. C., to assume command and direct operations against Fort Sumter.> while in charge of the military defences of Louisiana, and of the construction of the New Orleans custom-house, in the fall of 1860, General Beauregard, then brevet Major of United States Engineers, received the following order from Washington: Special order, no. 238. War Department, Adjutant-General's office, Washington, November 8th, 1860. By direction of the President, brevet M
1 2