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Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 25. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 2 2 Browse Search
William H. Herndon, Jesse William Weik, Herndon's Lincoln: The True Story of a Great Life, Etiam in minimis major, The History and Personal Recollections of Abraham Lincoln by William H. Herndon, for twenty years his friend and Jesse William Weik 2 2 Browse Search
Varina Davis, Jefferson Davis: Ex-President of the Confederate States of America, A Memoir by his Wife, Volume 1 2 2 Browse Search
John F. Hume, The abolitionists together with personal memories of the struggle for human rights 1 1 Browse Search
Frank Preston Stearns, Cambridge Sketches 1 1 Browse Search
Benson J. Lossing, Pictorial Field Book of the Civil War. Volume 2. 1 1 Browse Search
The Daily Dispatch: March 14, 1865., [Electronic resource] 1 1 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 1. (ed. Frank Moore) 1 1 Browse Search
James Parton, Horace Greeley, T. W. Higginson, J. S. C. Abbott, E. M. Hoppin, William Winter, Theodore Tilton, Fanny Fern, Grace Greenwood, Mrs. E. C. Stanton, Women of the age; being natives of the lives and deeds of the most prominent women of the present gentlemen 1 1 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 2. (ed. Frank Moore) 1 1 Browse Search
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the new school, there is nothing new. * * * Suppose all the Whigs should go over to the Free Soil party: It would only be a change of name; the principles would still be the same. But there would be one change which, I admit, would be monstrous — it would make Mr. Van Buren the head of the Whig party. [Laughter.] claimed Free soil as a distinctive Whig doctrine, and declared that, were the Whigs to join the peculiar Free soil organization, they would only make that the Whig party with Martin Van Buren at its head. Gov. Seward In his speech at Cleveland, Ohio, October 26, 1848, Gov. Seward said: A sixth principle is, that Slavery must be abolished. I think these are the principles of the Whigs of the Western Reserve of Ohio. <*> am not now to say for the first time that they are mine. * * * There are two antagonistic elements of society in America, Freedom and Slavery. Freedom is in harmony with our system of government, and with the spirit of the age, and is therefore p
if not to the extermination of one party or the other, to the almost shocking excesses. The humanity of the United States in respect to the weaker, and which, in such a terrible struggle, would probably be the suffering, portion, and the duty to defend themselves against the contagion of such near and dangerous examples, would constrain them. even at the hazard of losing the friendship of Mexico and Colombia, to employ all the means necessary to their security. Several years later, Mr. Van Buren, writing as Gen. Jackson's premier to Mr. C. P. Van Ness, our then Minister at Madrid, urges upon Spain, through him, the acknowledgment of South American independence, on this among other grounds: Considerations connected with a certain class of our population make it the interest of the Southern section of the Union that no attempt should be made in that island [Cuba] to throw off the yoke of Spanish dependence; the first effect of which would be the sudden emancipation of a numero
ions, and the political parties, were all immeasurably subservient to the Slave Power. In fact, the chief topic of political contention, whether in the press or on the stump, had for twenty years been the relative soundness and thoroughness of the rival parties in their devotion to Slavery. On this ground, Gen. Jackson had immensely the advantage of J. Q. Adams, so far as the South was concerned, when they were rival candidates for the Presidency; as Gen. Harrison had some advantage of Mr. Van Buren; Mr. Polk of Mr. Clay; Gen. Taylor of Gen. Cass; Gen. Pierce of Gen. Scott; and, lastly, Major Breckinridge of John Bell. In Kentucky, in the State canvass of 1859, Mr. Joshua F. Bell, American candidate for Governor, had tried hard to cut under his Democratic antagonist, Beriah Magoffin, but had failed, and been signally defeated. His more spotless record as a Slavery propagandist had enabled the supporters of Breckinridge to carry even Maryland for him against Bell, in 1860. And now
his House, at its next session, such amendments to the Constitution of the United States as shall assuage all grievances, and bring about a reconstruction of the national unity; and that, for the preparation of such .adjustment, and the conference requisite for that purpose, there be appointed a commission of seven citizens of the United States, consisting of Edward Everett, of Massachusetts, Franklin Pierce, of New Hampshire, Millard Fillmore, of New York, Reverdy Johnson, of Maryland, Martin Van Buren, of New York, Thomas Ewing, of Ohio, and James Guthrie, of Kentucky, who shall request from the so-called Confederate States the appointment of a similar commission, and who shall meet and confer on the subject in the city of Louisville, on the first Monday of September next. And that) the Committee appointed from this House notify said Commissioners of their appointment and function, and report their action to the next session, as an amendment of the Constitution of the United States,
this House, at its next session, such amendments to the Constitution of the United States as shall assuage all grievances, and bring about a reconstruction of the national unity; and that, for the preparation of such adjustment and the conference requisite for that purpose, there be appointed a commission of seven citizens of the United States, consisting of Edward Everett, of Massachusetts, Franklin Pierce, of New Hampshire, Millard Fillmore, of New York, Reverdy Johnson, of Maryland, Martin Van Buren, of New York, Thomas Ewing, of Ohio, and James Guthrie, of Kentucky, who shall request from the so-called Confederate States the appointment of a similar commission, and who shall meet and confer on the subject in the city of Louisville on the first Monday of September next. And that the committee appointed from this House notify said commissioners of their appointment and function, and report their action to the next session as an amendment of the Constitution of the United States, to
as and Mexico. This war resulted in the admission of California as a free State, which was carved out of Mexican territory acquired by the treaty of Guadaloupe Hidalgo. The balance thus established in the Senate and in the House as against slavery, it was patent, must remain forever. This condition of things in Congress was the controlling cause of secession. In 1848 the Free-Soilers, as the abolition party named themselves, made a considerable show of power by the nomination of Martin Van Buren for President of the United States, upon a Free-Soil platform, which prohibited thereafterwards the admission of any State which had established the institution of slavery by its constitution. The party had strength enough to defeat Cass, the Democratic candidate for President, and thus elected Taylor, the Whig candidate, a Southern slaveholder. The Abolitionists had put up a candidate for President at previous elections, but their vote was so small that it was never a factor in the p
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Albany regency, (search)
Albany regency, A name popularly given to a few active and able men of the democratic party who became associated in 1822, of whom Martin Van Buren was a leader, having their headquarters at Albany, N. Y., and who, in a great degree, controlled the action of their party throughout the Union. Their first great trial of strength was seen in an effort to elect William H. Crawford President of the United States in 1824, instead of John Quincy Adams. See Hunkers.
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Bancroft, George, (search)
ointed, by President Johnson (May 14), minister to Prussia, and accepted the office. In 1868 he was accredited to the North German Confederation, and in 1871 to the German Empire. In August, 1868, Mr. Bancroft received from the University of Bonn the honorary degree of Doctor Juris ; and in 1870 he celebrated the fiftieth anniversary of the reception of his first degree at Gottingen. Mr. Bancroft was a contributor of numerous essays to the North American review. In 1889 he published Martin Van Buren to the end of his public career, which he had written many years before. His History of the United States has been translated into several languages. In 1882 he published a History of the formation of the Constitution in 2 volumes. This completed his great work, in accordance with his original plan. He died Jan. 17, 1891. The death of Lincoln.--On April 25, 1865, Mr. Bancroft delivered the following oration on the death of President Lincoln, in New York City, at a great gathering
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Butler, Benjamin Franklin, 1818-1893 (search)
good of those whom he addresses; and let me here repeat, with all the solemnity of an appeal to Heaven to bear me witness, that such are the views forced upon me by experience. Come, then, to the unconditional support of the government. Take into your own hands your own institutions; remodel them according to the laws of nations and of God, and thus attain that great prosperity assured to you by geographical position, only a portion of which was heretofore yours. lawyer; born in Kinderhook Landing, N. Y., Dec. 17, 1795; studied law with Martin Van Buren in Hudson, and subsequently became his partner. In 1825 he was appointed one of the three commissioners to revise the Statutes of New York; in 1833-38 was Attorney-General of the United States; and in 1836-37 was acting Secretary of War. In 1837 he became Professor of Law in the University of the City of New York. He was the author of Outlines of the constitutional history of New York. He died in Paris, France, Nov. 8, 1858.
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Cabinet, President's (search)
r Department, was transferred, by act of Congress, to this department. The following is a list of all members of Presidential cabinets since the organization of the federal government: Secretaries of State. Name.Appointed. Thomas JeffersonSept.26,1789 Edmund RandolphJan.2,1794 Timothy Pickering Dec.10,1795 John MarshallMay13,1800 James Madison March 5, 1801 Robert Smith March 6, 1809 James Monroe April 2, 1811 John Quincy Adams March 5, 1817 Henry Clay March 7, 1825 Martin Van Buren March 6, 1929 Edward Livingston May 24, 1831 Louis McLane May 29, 1833 John Forsyth June 27, 1834 Daniel Webster March 5, 1841 Hugh S. Legare May 9, 1843 Abel P. Upshur July 24, 1843 John C. Calhoun March 6, 1844 James Buchanan March 6, 1845 John M. Clayton March 7, 1849 Daniel Webster July 22, 1850 Edward Everett Nov. 6, 1852 William L. Marcy March 7, 1853 Lewis CassMarch 6, 1857 Jeremiah S. Black Dec. 17, 1860 William H. Seward .March 5, 1861 Elihu B. Washburne M
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