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ard, Gen. Bonham sent Col. Kershaw's regiment, with Kemper's battery of four guns annexed, and Col. Cash's regiment, to the rescue. On they came from four miles below, at a rapid march, driving greaed of the enemy. It was taken twice, but retaken again; and it was only when the regiments of Cols. Cash and Kershaw had cleared the land to the left that the effort to retake it was abandoned. The not ask for mercy on the souls of those he sent to their account. The regiments of Kershaw and Cash, with Kemper's Battery, followed to within a mile of Centreville. The road was strewed with plunhat undertook to defend Rickett's battery were at last driven off by the regiments of Kershaw and Cash; and thus in the hands of these Carolinians the possession of this battery permanently rested; anmen, Colonel Elzey's brigade, and marched hurriedly to our assistance. Colonel Kershaw's and Colonel Cash's regiments arrived upon the ground at the same moment, and with these, 4,000 men, General Sm
d, and the intrenchments were quietly entered and taken possession of by the skirmishers. The position was a very strong one, and could have been easily defended. A large quantity of shovels, picks, bags of oats, buckets, &c., was found in the work, and camp fires were still burning in the rear of it. Half a mile further on, Germantown, a hamlet of half a dozen houses, was reached and found almost deserted. The only white person left stated that twenty-five hundred rebels, including Colonel Cash's South Carolina Regiment, had occupied the breastworks, and retreated only about fifteen minutes before the Union skirmishers appeared in sight of the town. A short halt is now being made for dinner by the First division, in the woods adjoining Germantown. The division will move on this afternoon to the vicinity of Centreville, where the enemy is said to be in strong force. half-past 1, P. M. General McDowell and staff have just arrived, at the head of four companies of cavalry.
kins' 5th South Carolina, and Bunt's 15th and Fetherstone's 18th regiments of Mississippi volunteers, with two brass 6-pounder guns of Walton's battery, and one company of cavalry. Longstreet's brigade covered Blackburn's Ford, and consisted of Moore's 1st, Garland's 11th and Crose's 17th regiments Virginia volunteers, with two 6-pounder brass guns of Walton's battery. Bonham's brigade held the approaches to Mitchell's Ford; it was composed of Kershaw's 2d, Williams' 3d, Bacon's 7th and Cash's 8th regiments South Carolina volunteers; of Shields' and Del Kemper's batteries, and of Flood's, Radford's, Payne's, Ball's, Wickman's and Powell's companies of Virginia cavalry, under Col. Radford. Cocke's brigade held the Fords below and in vicinity of the Stone Bridge, and consisted of Wither's 18th, Lieutenant-Colonel Strange's 19th, and R. T. Preston's 28th regiments, with Latham's battery and one company of cavalry, Virginia volunteers. Evans held my left flank and protected the
n, out scouting, and Capt. Rhett, on picket guard, to march across the fields to the left, and join their regiment, the 2d, which is on the march to aid the left wing. This regiment, to which was attached Kemper's battery, followed by the 8th, Col. Cash, hurried to the scene of action. It was met along the way by numbers of the wounded, dying, and retiring, who declared that the day had gone against us; that Sloan's regiment, the 4th, was cut to pieces; that Hampton's Legion, coming to the reace between this regiment, with Kemper's battery attached, unsupported, and an immense force of United States troops. We poured in a steady and deadly fire upon their ranks. While the battle raged, the 8th South Carolina regiment came up, and Col. Cash, pointing to the enemy, says, Col. Kershaw, are those the d----d scoundrels that you wish driven off the field? I'll do it in five minutes, by God! Yes, Colonel, says Kershaw, form on our left, and do it if you can. In a few moments the 8th
A correspondent of the Charleston Mercury, writing from Richmond, Va., says:--It is settled, without question, that at one time during the fight, our army was on the eve of being defeated. This was in the early part of the afternoon. Scattered and exhausted as were our men, victory, for a time, inclined to favor the overwhelming army of the enemy, and its General, believing he had gained a victory, despatched the news to Washington. Happily, at this critical juncture, Kershaw, Cash, and Kemper stemmed and turned the adverse tide, driving the frightened foe before their accurate fire and rapid charges. Both Beauregard and Johnston rallied their forces, and led them in person to the attack. Soon after, Elzey's and Smith's brigades, of about four thousand men, came up opportunely and reinforced our army. This reinforcement, with the heroic rally made by the Generals, after Kershaw turned the tide of battle in our favor, decided the fortunes of the field. A member of the Palme
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Poetry and Incidents., Volume 2. (ed. Frank Moore), A member of the Palmetto guard writes to the Charleston Mercury:--(no. 32) (search)
A member of the Palmetto guard writes to the Charleston Mercury:--(no. 32) Stone Bridge, Bull Run, July 23, 1861. Since writing you, we have had a terrible, though glorious fight — this makes the second. The fight commenced on the left flank of our line, and we in the centre (Cash's and Kershaw's regiments) received orders to march. When you were. in church, we were in the bloodiest fight recorded that has ever transpired in North America. The day was lost when our two regiments came up. Our troops were falling back, and had retired some distance. Col. Kershaw gave the command Forward! and after some ten or twelve rounds, away went the Yankees. I understand Beauregard said our regiments saved the day --a second battle of Waterloo. * * * * No regiment ever entered a battle under more depressing circumstances than we did. All along our line of march men were retreating, and saying to us, We are defeated. But we went forward, and the day was wo
outing, and Capt. Rhett, on picket guard, to march across the fields to the left, and join their regiment, the Second, which is on the march, to aid the left wing. This regiment, to which was attached Kemper's battery, followed by the Seventh, Col. Cash, hurried to the scene of action. It was met along the way by numbers of the wounded, dying, and retiring, who declared the day had gone against us; that Sloan's regiment, the Fourth, were cut to pieces; that Hampton's Legion, coming to the res between this regiment, with Kemper's battery attached, unsupported, and an immense force of United States troops. We poured in a steady and deadly fire upon their ranks. While the battle raged, the Eighth South Carolina regiment came up, and Col. Cash, pointing to the enemy, says, Col. Kershaw, are those the d — d scoundrels that you wish driven off the field? I'll do it in five minutes, by God! Yes, Colonel, says Kershaw; form on our left, and do it if you can. In a few moments the Eight
troduced him formally as Hon. Mr. Ely, member of Congress from New York. Instantly the Colonel drew a pistol, cocked it and levelled it at Mr. Ely's head, not two paces distant, and said, You d — d rascal, I'll blow your brains out. The two officers who had arrested Mr. Ely instantly threw themselves upon the Colonel, forced his pistol back, and persuaded him away. They then apologized to Mr. Ely, saying they were ashamed of their Colonel, who was excited by drinking. This officer was Colonel Cash, and the officer who arrested Mr. Ely was Captain Mullins. Mr. Ely was put with a large herd of prisoners, and all were started to Manassas. It was a march of seven weary miles, and the prisoners suffered tortures from the dust, heat, and thirst. At Manassas, which they reached at nine o'clock P. M., they were driven into an open space, surrounded thickly by guards, and all began to fall on the ground, then wet with a fast-falling rain, to seek rest and sleep. While Mr. Ely was prep
William Tecumseh Sherman, Memoirs of General William T. Sherman ., volume 1, Chapter 1: early recollections of California. 1846-1848. (search)
uckel the points and the arguments of Ricord, that the company should not suffer from an act of God, viz., the caving in of the mouth of the mine, when a man named Cash, a fellow who had once been in the quartermaster's employ as a teamster, spoke up: Governor Mason, did Judge Ricord say that? Yes, said the Governor; and then CasCash related how he and another man, whose name he gave, had been employed by Ricord to undermine a heavy rock that rested above the mouth of the mine, so that it tumbled down, carrying with it a large quantity of earth, and completely filled it up, as we had seen; and, said Cash, it took us three days of the hardest kind of work. TCash, it took us three days of the hardest kind of work. This was the act of God, and on the papers procured from the alcalde at that time, I understand, was built a huge speculation, by which thousands of dollars changed hands in the United States and were lost. This happened long before the celebrated McGarrahan claim, which has produced so much noise, and which still is being prosecu
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 9. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Memoir of First Maryland regiment. (search)
red by thousands of men and horses; catching handfuls, they thrust it in their mouths without stopping. A field officer, without a hat, galloped by. Hurrah, Maryland, he shouted, and the regiment responded with a cheer and sprang forward with renewed vigor. After running thus five miles they were halted to load, thus giving them a moment's breath. But almost instantly forward is the order, and on they push brisk as ever. Rushing up an open slope, crested by a thin wood, they passed over Cash and Kershaw, of South Carolina, waiting orders. Just then half a dozen shots from the woods struck General Smith from his horse. In a second Company F was at them, and had driven them off before they could be stopped firing. The enemy were some of the Ellsworth Zouaves. Without delay General Elzey ordered a change of front and struck off towards the left. He formed his brigade in a wood not far from the Chinn House--Third Tennessee on the right, First Maryland in the centre, Tenth Virg
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