Browsing named entities in George Bancroft, History of the United States from the Discovery of the American Continent, Vol. 6, 10th edition.. You can also browse the collection for Conway or search for Conway in all documents.

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erica. The last public act of Grenville's life was a step towards representative reform by establishing a more impartial method of deciding controverted elections. It was perhaps the most honorable trophy of his long Chap. XLIV.} 1770. April. career. On the ninth of April, four days after Grenville had carried his bill triumphantly to the House of Lords, one more attempt was made to conciliate America; and Trecothick of London, supported by Beckford and Lord Beauchamp, by Dowdeswell, Conway, Dunning the late Solicitor General, and Sir George Saville, proposed Garth to Committee of South Carolina, 11 April, 1770. W. S. Johnson to Gov. Trnmbull of Connecticut, 14 April, 1770. the repeal of the duty on tea. The King who watched Parliament closely, was indignant at this debate in the teeth of a standing order, King to Lord North, 9 April, 1770; from the papers of Lord North, communicated to me by his daughter. on a proposal which had already been voted down. I wish to concil
mer Governor of Massachusetts. I hope, for the sake of this country, for the sake of America, for the sake of general liberty, that this Address will go with a unanimous vote. As nothing was proposed but to carry out the Declaratory Act, no man in England could so little find fault with the principle of the proposed measures, as Edmund Burke; he only taunted the Ministry with their wavering policy. Lord George Germain derived all the American disturbance from the repeal of the Stamp tax. Conway pleaded for unanimity. I speak, said William Burke, as an Englishman; we applaud ourselves for the struggle we have had for our Constitution; the Colonists are our fellowsub-jects; they will not lose theirs without a struggle. Barre applauded the good temper with which the subject had been discussed, and refused to make any opposition The leading question, said Wedderburn, who bore the principal part in the debate, is the dependence or independence of America. The Address was adopted with
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