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Medford Historical Society Papers, Volume 5., Medford Historical Society, Seventh year, 1902-1903. (search)
Medford Historical Society, Seventh year, 1902-1903. October 20.—Time-keeping in a Medford Home two hundred Years Ago. Mr. John Albree, Jr., Swampscott, and Social Meeting. November 17.—Medford in 1847. Mr. Charles Cummings. December 15.—The Middlesex Canal. (Illustrated.) Mr. Moses W. Mann. January 19.—The Environment and Tendencies of Colonial Life. (Illustrated.) Rev. George M. Bodge of Westwood. February 16.—The Baptist Church of Medford. Mrs. Amanda H. Plummer. March 16.—Annual Meeting. April 20.—Rev. John Pierpont: His Life and Work. Rev. Henry C. DeLong. May 18.—The 39th Massachusetts Regiment in the Civil War. Hon. C. H. Porter of Quincy. Committee on Papers and Addresses. David H. Brown. Walter H. Cushing. Charles H. Morss. John H. Hooper. William Cushing Wait. Miss A
Medford Historical Society Papers, Volume 6., The Lawrence Light Guard.—Continued. (search)
Saturday evening course of lectures for 1903 offers an attractive set of topics. Last month Mr. Walter C. Wright read a paper on the Gypsy Moth: Past, Present and Future, describing the habits of the pest and the most effective way of ridding the city of its ravages. He placed great responsibility on individual occupants of real estate, who might, by conscientious work, keep the moth in check on private property, while the State and City could be fully occupied in taking care of the trees in reservations, parks and highways. The following papers will be given during the winter and spring:— January 3.—Some Evils of our present Nominating System, and how they can be removed. Hon. F. W. Dallinger, of Cambridge. February 7.—Matthew Cradock. Mr. W. K. Watkins, of Malden. March 7.—How can we make Medford more beautiful? Mr. Edward P. Adams. April 4.—The Second Charter of Massachusetts. Mr. Walter H. Cushing. May 2.—Spot Pond, as it was and is. Mr. Herbert
Medford Historical Society Papers, Volume 6., Medford Historical Society. (search)
n. Standing Committees. Publication. Miss Helen T. Wild, Chairman. David H. Brown. Henry M. Begien. George S. T. Fuller. H. A. Weitz. Moses W. Mann. Membership. Rosewell B. Lawrence, Chairman. John H. Hooper. Mrs. Ellen M. Gill. Calvin H. Clark. Miss Jessie M. Dinsmore. Miss Lily B. Atherton. Walter F. Cushing. Clifton Loring. A. M. Stickney. Mortimer E. Wilber. Percy W. Richardson. E. B. Dennison. Papers and addresses. David H. Brown, Chairman Walter H. Cushing. Charles H. Morss. John H. Hooper. William Cushing Wait. Miss Agnes W. Lincoln. Historic Sites. John H. Hooper, Chairman L. J. Manning. Francis A. Wait. Miss Ella L. Burbank. Mrs. J. M. G. Plummer. Moses W. Mann. Frederick H. Kidder. Genealogy. Geo. S. Delano, Chairman Miss Ella S. Hinckley. Miss Eliza M. Gill. David H. Brown. Miss Hetty F. Wait. Gilbert Hodges. Mrs. Emmie N. Cleaves. Heraldry. Benjamin P. Hollis, Chairman. F. H. C. Woolley. Pe
Medford Historical Society Papers, Volume 7., Medford Historical Society. (search)
Standing committees. Publication. Miss Helen T. Wild, Chairman. David H. Brown. Henry M. Begien. George S. T. Fuller. H. A. Weitz. Moses W. Mann. Membership. Rosewell B. Lawrence, Chairman. John H. Hooper. Mrs. Ellen M. Gill. Calvin H. Clark. Miss Jessie M. Dinsmore. Miss Lily B. Atherton. Walter F. Cushing. Edw. W. Teele. Clifton Loring. J. L. Brockway. Mortimer E. Wilber. Percy W. Richardson. Papers and addresses. David H. Brown, Chairman. Walter H. Cushing. Charles H. Morss. John H. Hooper. William Cushing Wait. Miss Agnes W. Lincoln Historic Sites. James Hedenberg, Chairman. L. J. Manning. Francis A. Wait. Miss Ella L. Burbank. John F. Libbey. Moses W. Mann. Frederick H. Kidder. Genealogy. Geo. S. Delano, Chairman. Miss Ella S. Hinckley. Miss Eliza M. Gill. Rev. C. L. Eaton. Miss Hetty F. Wait. Chas. H. Barnes. Mrs. Emmie N. Cleaves. Heraldry. F. H. C. Woolley, Chairman. W. A. Thompson. Percy
that might otherwise be lost; and to preserve them in a worthy and attractive form. That a good degree of success has been attained is evident. The first four volumes bear the imprint of Rockwell & Churchill, Boston; the others show the excellent and careful work of our townsman, J. C. Miller, Jr. The preparation of the illustrations has been mainly the work of Mr. Eddy; though thanks for the use of cuts are due in a few cases to others. During ten years, Messrs. C. H. Loomis, Walter H. Cushing, Will C. Eddy and Miss Helen T. Wild were successively editors. By their able work, a reputable position among kindred publications has been reached. Mr. David H. Brown succeeded Miss Wild, and the issue of January, 1908, was edited by him. After his death Mr. Moses W. Mann was chosen as his successor. With the work of nearly two years before our patrons, the present incumbent bespeaks co-operation in the line of increased circulation and contribution of short articles relative to
rest entirely. The fourteen volumes of the Medford Historical Register contain many valuable articles written by Miss Mary Sargent, James A. Hervey, Thomas S. Harlow, Lorin Low Dame, Abby Drew Saxe, Parker R. Litchfield, Benjamin F. Morrison, David H. Brown, Charles Cummings, Dr. Charles M. Green, Rev. Henry C. DeLong, John H. Hooper, Moses Whitcher Mann, Charles H. Morss, Myra Brayton Morss, Helen Tilden Wild, Anna D. Hallowell, Eliza M. Gill, Caroline E. Swift, William Cushing Wait, Walter H. Cushing, Fred H. C. Woolley, Benjamin Pratt Hollis, Herbert N. Ackerman, Mrs. J. M. G. Plummer, Grace L. Sargent, Charles H. Loomis, Ellen Wright, and many others. The annals of the Shakespeare Club, started in 1866 by Miss Alice Ayres, forms a distinguished chapter in the literary history of the town. For thirty-four years a modest little reading club has studied literature, history, and problems of the day. The numerous essays written by its members, if published, would be found worthy o
o do it. In the above quotation, the Nomad asks a pertinent query, and his somewhat conditional reply is well illustrated by Mr. Brooks' successor, Mr. Usher, in his work of 1886, a practical reprint of the History of 1855. But who were the gentlemen of the Historical Society, the iconoclasts who assailed the bogus history, and established beyond doubt the identity of the house in question? In reply we name three: Hon. William Cushing Wait, in his article on Maps of Medford, Mr. Walter H. Cushing, in The Cradock Farm, both read at Society meetings and published in the Register. Then, Mr. John H. Hooper took up the burden of proof, by a careful search in the Middlesex Registry. The result of his work, read before the Society, preserved on our pages (Vol. VII, pp. 49-64), fixes the erection of the so-called Cradock house as at about 1680 (not 1634) at the instance of Peter Tufts (commonly called Captain Peter), a leading citizen of Medford at that time. Both gentlemen befor
Medford Historical Society Papers, Volume 24., Medford Historical Society. (search)
Frederic H. Dole. Telephone Connection. Chestnut Street. Financial secretary and Treasurer. Gegrge S. T. Fuller. Telephone, Mystic 2208-W. George Street. Librarian and Curator. Moses Whitcher Mann. Telephone, Arlington 545-M. 138 Boston Avenue, West Medford. Directors. William Leavens. John A. C. Emerson. Melvin W. Pierce. The above constitute the Board of Directors which meets at the call of the President. The Society's Honorary members are Walter H. Cushing. George S. Delano. Benjamin P. Hollis. Charles N. Jones. Membership list. Herbert N. Ackerman. Ida M. Ackerman. Amy A. Ackerman. Isabelle Ackerman. John Albree. Lily B. Atherton. Ernest W. Anderson. Abner H. Barker. Charles S. Baxter. Life Member. Frederick N. Beals. E. Earl Blakeley. Edward P. Boynton. Life Member. C. W. M. Blanchard. Jennie S. Brigham. Clifford M. Brewer. Edmund Bridge. Shepherd Brooks. Life Member. Frederick Brooks.
Medford Historical Society Papers, Volume 26., The Medford High School under Lorin L. Dame (search)
already patent, had started an agitation for a more permanent school. The teaching force now grew rapidly larger. Miss Josephine E. Bruce, P. T. Campbell, Walter H. Cushing and Miss Marion Nottage were new members of the force. The work of Mr. Cushing, himself a Medford man, in history, civics and debate was exceptionally fine Mr. Cushing, himself a Medford man, in history, civics and debate was exceptionally fine and well recognized in the universities. In 1892 the high school, in connection with work of the schools of the city, had been awarded a medal for the excellence of the work submitted to the Columbian Exposition at Chicago—a very gratifying reward to the principal and to the board. It is a certificate of the high order of work ace city. There was a continuous stream of changes in courses, of extension of Latin into the ninth grade, of history outlines in the lower grades, elaborated by Mr. Cushing, of a welding together of the whole school system. The principal devised an ingenious system of organization so that he knew at once where each of his six hund
Medford Historical Society Papers, Volume 29., The Cradock house, past and future. (search)
ia Salem or Boston. But more decisive than probability is the proof afforded by some old maps. See Historical Register, Vol. I, No. 4: Maps of Medford of Different Periods, by William Cushing Wait, and Governor Cradock's Plantation, by Walter H. Cushing. On one map of about 1633, the way from Mistick ford to Salem is indicated by two dotted parallel lines, and the farmhouse of Mr. Cradock is located between the way and the river. The word Meadford appears close beside the house, and in t seruants write they drinke nothinge but water & I haue in an account lateley sent me Red Wyne, Sack & aquavitae in one yeere aboue 300 gallons besides many other to intollerable abusss, £ 10 for tobacco, etc. These quotations were made by Mr. Cushing with his usual humorous acumen from the Colony records. It is very characteristic of Cradock, however, that, imposed upon as he was, unsuccessful as he was, he developed his land with steady perseverance, building the Cradock bridge, offering
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