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James Barnes, author of David G. Farragut, Naval Actions of 1812, Yank ee Ships and Yankee Sailors, Commodore Bainbridge , The Blockaders, and other naval and historical works, The Photographic History of The Civil War: in ten volumes, Thousands of Scenes Photographed 1861-65, with Text by many Special Authorities, Volume 6: The Navy. (ed. Francis Trevelyan Miller) 8 2 Browse Search
George Meade, The Life and Letters of George Gordon Meade, Major-General United States Army (ed. George Gordon Meade) 6 0 Browse Search
The Daily Dispatch: November 22, 1861., [Electronic resource] 5 1 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 9. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 5 1 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 4. (ed. Frank Moore) 4 2 Browse Search
Brigadier-General Ellison Capers, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 5, South Carolina (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 3 1 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Poetry and Incidents., Volume 4. (ed. Frank Moore) 2 0 Browse Search
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War: Volume 2. 2 0 Browse Search
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing) 2 0 Browse Search
Joseph T. Derry , A. M. , Author of School History of the United States; Story of the Confederate War, etc., Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 6, Georgia (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 1 1 Browse Search
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Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 4., chapter 7.54 (search)
f both hands for his spy-glass, or any other purpose. Captain Drayton, commanding the Hartford, and also chief-of-staff to to communicate with him. He was at all times visible to Captain Drayton and the flag-lieutenant (myself), who were standing ond to be moving out from under the guns of Fort Morgan. Captain Drayton reported this fact to the admiral, who was then on there. Get under way at once; we must be ready for him! Captain Drayton could not believe this, and we were a little slow abouact been generally known that the admiral himself told Captain Drayton and me, shortly after the battle, exactly what took pl came to hand, a few days after the battle, he said to Captain Drayton and myself in conversation, How curiously some triflin smoke. The lashing was the result of your own fears [Captain Drayton's] for my safety. At the close of the war he yielded e upper sheer ratline (about five or six ratlines up). Captain Drayton sent a quarter-master with a piece of lead-line to las
Benson J. Lossing, Pictorial Field Book of the Civil War. Volume 2., Chapter 5: military and naval operations on the coast of South Carolina.--military operations on the line of the Potomac River. (search)
er Major Jones. under General T. F. Drayton, a wealthy land-owner, whose mansion was not more than a miledistant from it, standing a few yards. from the beach, and overlooking a. beautiful expanse of land and water.. He was a brother of Captain Percival Drayton, commander of the Pocahontas, of this expedition. On the beach at Camp Lookout, six miles from Fort Walker, were sixty-five men of Scriven's guerrillas, who acted as scouts and couriers for the commander. These forces were increased, bfantry from Georgia, under command of Captain Berry; Captain Reed's battery of two 10-pounder howitzers and 50 men, and Colonel De Saussure's Fifteenth South Carolina. Volunteers, numbering 650 men. The force on Bay Point was six hundred T . P. Drayton. and forty men, commanded by Colonel R. G. M. Dunovant. See page 188, volume I. Of these, one hundred and forty-nine, consisting of the Beaufort Volunteer Artillery, garrisoned Fort Beauregard,. under the immediate command of Captain Stephe
Benson J. Lossing, Pictorial Field Book of the Civil War. Volume 2., Chapter 12: operations on the coasts of the Atlantic and the Gulf of Mexico. (search)
picked up on the waters, that the troops had abandoned it, and were fleeing from Amelia Island. The rumor was confirmed, and Dupont immediately sent forward Commander Drayton, of the Pawnee, with several gunboats, to save the public property there and prevent outrages. He then returned to the Wabash, and, going outside, went down to the main entrance to Fernandina harbor. There he was detained until the next morning. Meanwhile Drayton had sent Lieutenant White, of the Ottawa, to hoist the National flag over Fort Clinch. This The Union Generals. was the first of the old National forts which was repossessed by the Government. The Confederates fled eastern terminus of the Cedar Keys and Fernandina Railway, that crossed from the island to the main on trestle-work. A train was just starting on the arrival of Drayton. In the Ottawa he pursued it about two miles, firing several shots at the locomotive, but without doing much damage. near the fort, and also from the village of
Benson J. Lossing, Pictorial Field Book of the Civil War. Volume 3., Chapter 6: siege of Knoxville.--operations on the coasts of the Carolinas and Georgia. (search)
eir relief, and to make them useful. On the plantation of the Confederate General Drayton, a short mile from Hilton Head, he laid out a village plot, and caused nea from the North, was an interesting feature of the village society. The men Drayton's mansion. were employed largely in cultivating the soil of Hilton Head Island, and were making the desolated plantation of Drayton (whose mansion-house, deserted and ruined, stood near) quite as productive as when its owner was master of scot McAllister. They went up the Ogeechee on the 3d of March, the Passaic, Commander Drayton, leading. The obstructions in the river would not allow her to approach every fifteen minutes, and kept it up until next morning. March 4, 1863. Then Drayton went up as near the fort as possible with the Passaic, for observation, shield commanders were as follows: Weehawken, Captain John Rodgers; Passaic, Captain Percival Drayton; Montauk, Commander John L. Worden; Patapsco, Commander Daniel Ammen;
Benson J. Lossing, Pictorial Field Book of the Civil War. Volume 3., Chapter 16: career of the Anglo-Confederate pirates.--closing of the Port of Mobile — political affairs. (search)
e blockade, see page 812, volume II. from slipping in with valuable cargoes of needful supplies, and slipping out again with equally valuable cargoes of cotton for the use of England's mills. it was resolved to seal up the Port of Mobile first, and for that purpose, Admiral Farragut appeared Aug. 5, 1864. off the entrance of Mobile Bay, full thirty miles below the City, with a fleet of eighteen vessels, four of them iron-clad, the wooden vessels were the Hartford (flag-ship), Captain P. Drayton; Brooklyn, Captain James Alden; Metacomet, Lieutenant-Commander J. E. Jonett; Octorara, Lieutenant-Commander C. H. Green; Richmond, Captain T. A. Jenkins; Lackawanna, Captain J. B. Marchand; Monongahela, Commander J. H. Strong; Ossi. Pee, Commander W. E. Leroy; Oneida, Commander J. R. M. Mullaney; Port Royal, Lieutenant-Commander B. Gherarde; Seminole, Commander E. Donaldson; Kennebeck, Lieutenant-Commander W. P. McCann; Itasca, Lieutenant-Commander George Brown, and Galena, Lieutenan
Admiral David D. Porter, The Naval History of the Civil War., Chapter 6: naval expedition against Port Royal and capture of that place. (search)
sing the fighting squadron. Commodore Tatnall withdraws. loyalty of Commander Percival Drayton. evacuation of Fort Walker by the Confederates. treacherous foes. Before the close of the bombardment the steam gunboat Pocahontas, Commander Percival Drayton, came into port and joined in the attack. Her commanding officer was brother to General Drayton, the Confederate commander of the forts. Commander Drayton, although attached to the South by the strongest ties of consanguinity anCommander Drayton, although attached to the South by the strongest ties of consanguinity and friendship, chose to sever them all rather than prove faithless to the Government to which he had sworn allegiance, and to which he considered himself bound by eveg was concentrated on Fort Beauregard, yet it had thirteen men wounded. General Drayton, commanding the Confederate forces, reported that in Fort Walker there wer no defences of the kind, and our forces lost the opportunity of capturing General Drayton and all his command, who escaped either in Tatnall's steamers or in army t
Admiral David D. Porter, The Naval History of the Civil War., Chapter 8: capture of Fernandina and the coast South of Georgia. (search)
works in that quarter had been abandoned, except those at Stono Inlet. Commander Drayton, in the Pawnee, accompanied by one or two gunboats, entered St. Helena Soernon rivers heavy earth-works were being erected by the Confederates. Commander Drayton crossed the North Edisto Bar, and found an abandoned earthwork, intended hed the light gun-boats and light draft steamers from the main line under Commander Drayton, and ordered that officer to push through the Sound with the utmost dispasea to the main entrance of the harbor. On entering Fernandina Harbor, Commander Drayton sent an officer to hoist a white flag on Fort Clinch, the first of the nace made by them. A railway train left the town as the gun-boat arrived. Commander Drayton in the Ottawa gave chase to it along the river and fired several shells ae in his selection, the names of Captain C. H. Davis, Commanders John Rodgers, Drayton, C. R. P. Rodgers, Godon, Parrott, Steedman, Gillis, Prentiss, Lieutenants-Com
Admiral David D. Porter, The Naval History of the Civil War., Chapter 9: operations of Admiral Dupont's squadron in the sounds of South Carolina. (search)
e of Warsaw Inlet. Lieutenant Barnes invades forts. Commander Drayton goes up the North Edisto River. object of the expediinlets. The reconnoissance in St. Helena Sound, by Commander Drayton, has been already referred to. This bay was considere accomplished. On the 16th of December, 1861, Commander Percival Drayton was sent on a reconnoissance of the North Edistoof the country gave much valuable assistance. While Captain Drayton was examining into the condition of some works (which antry, but they decamped in a great hurry, leaving in Commander Drayton's hands a sloop, loaded with cotton and provisions, lmight be decided on in the future. On December 5th Commander Drayton again proceeded on a reconnoissance to Saint Helena Snion people away. On the above-mentioned occasion, Commander Drayton's policy was a generous one. A large number of the neady for a fight. The names of Commanders John Rodgers, Drayton, C. R. P. Rodgers, Godon, Rhind, Stevens, Balch, Ammen, Tr
Admiral David D. Porter, The Naval History of the Civil War., Chapter 33: (search)
ed upon their conviction as truth. Captain Percival Drayton, U. S. N. On the 1st of February Adlly test the working of the turrets. Captain Percival Drayton, commanding the Passaic, was directed. M., March 3, 1863, opened fire, and, as Captain Drayton reported, the parapets were much cut up a could not be repaired in a few hours. Captain Drayton did not consider the fort nearly as greatt the same thing was true of the fort. Captain Drayton expressed some mortification at what he cme other privateer or blockade-runner. Captain Drayton's opinion was that the fire of the iron-cn Captian John Rodgers. 2. Passaic Captain Percival Drayton. 3. Montauk Captain John L. Wordenarly untenable by flying bolts and nuts. Captain Drayton, in the Passaic, after the fourth fire fron. Iron-clad steamer Passaic. Captain, Percival Drayton; Lieutenant-Commander, Joseph N. Mil-Commander Ammen. The Pocahontas, Commander Percival Drayton, had suffered from the gale of Frida
Admiral David D. Porter, The Naval History of the Civil War., Letters relating to the battle of Port Royal and occupation of the Confederate forts. (search)
s the fate of Fort Walker was decided, I dispatched a small squadron to Fort Beauregard to reconnoitre and ascertain its condition, and to prevent the rebel steamers returning to carry away either persons or property. Near sunset it was discovered that the flag upon this fort was hauled down, and that the fort was apparently abandoned. At sunrise the next day the American ensign was hoisted on the flag-staff at Fort Beauregard by Lieutenant-Commander Ammen. The Pocahontas, Commander Percival Drayton, had suffered from the gale of Friday night so badly as not to be able to enter Port Royal until the morning of the 7th. He reached the scene of action about 12 o'clock, and rendered gallant service by engaging the batteries on both sides in succession. Lieutenant-Commander H. L. Newcomnb, of the R. B. Forbes, which vessel had been employed in towing in the Great Republic, arrived in time to take good part in the action. And, finally, the tug Mercury, Acting-Master Martin co
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