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General Joseph E. Johnston, Narrative of Military Operations During the Civil War, Report of Hon. L. T. Wigfall in the Senate of the Confederate States, march 18, 1865. (search)
he then held a position in front of Kenesaw for a month, and left that, at last, because, by extending his intrenchments, Sherman had got nearer to Atlanta by several miles than we were. In all the fighting we had been successful, and that in positions frequently prepared for defense in a few hours. Is it probable, then, that General Johnston would not have attempted to hold a place fortified already to his hand under the direction of the Engineer Bureau, and previously inspected by Major-General Gilmer, the chief-engineer of our army? Why had he been strengthening it from the 5th of July, with all the labor he could command, if he did not intend to defend it, in the event of his failing to crush the enemy at Peach-tree Creek? Why was he strengthening it at the very moment of his removal a If the position was as weak as described by General Hood, why did Sherman not attempt to carry it by assault? The place, in my judgment, could not have been taken either by assault or investm
ur right, but continuous on our left, with defences for our light artillery, were laid off by Major Gilmer--engineer of General A. S. Johnston's staff, but on duty with me at the post — around the reamy senior officer, reached that station. The works were laid off with judgment and skill, by Major Gilmer; were well executed, and designed for the defence of the rear of the works; the only objectioand to save a quarter; that no officer had a right to cause such a sacrifice. Gen. Floyd and Maj. Gilmer I understood to concur in this opinion. I then expressed the opinion that we could hold ouad from thirty thousand to forty thousand on the field. I must acknowledge my obligations to Major Gilmer, engineer, for the especial and valuable services rendered me in laying off the works, and thuted my orders under trying circumstances throughout the long and continued conflicts; and to Major Gilmer, who accompanied me throughout the entire day. Also, to Capt. Parker of my staff, whom I assi
ruggle, it is equally true that there is scarcely a locality within our limits which could not have done, and which cannot now do, more. Many weeks before this crisis in our affairs, Gen. Johnston sent a highly accomplished and able engineer, Major Gilmer, to Nashville, to construct fortifications for the defence of the city. Laborers were needed for their construction. I joined Major Gilmer in an earnest appeal to the people to send in their laborers for the purpose, offering full and fair cMajor Gilmer in an earnest appeal to the people to send in their laborers for the purpose, offering full and fair compensation. This appeal was so feebly responded to that I advised Gen. Johnston to impress the necessary labor; but owing to the difficulty in obtaining the laborers, the works were not completed-indeed, some of them but little more than commenced-when Fort Donelson fell. Under the act of May sixth, 1861, I raised, organized, and equipped a large volunteer force, but under the Military League and the act of the General Assembly, it was made my duty to transfer that army, with all of our mun
rection exists: Now, therefore, be it known that I, Abraham Lincoln, President of the United States of America, do hereby declare and proclaim that the States of South-Carolina, Florida, Georgia, Alabama, Louisiana, Texas, Mississippi, Arkansas, Tennessee, North-Carolina, and the State of Virginia, except the following counties, Hancock, Brooke, Ohio, Marshall, Wetzel, Marion, Monongalia, Preston, Taylor, Pleasants, Tyler, Ritchie, Doddridge, Harrison, Wood, Jackson, Wirt, Roane, Calhoun, Gilmer, Barbour, Tucker, Lewis, Braxton, Upshur, Randolph, Mason, Putnam, Kanawha, Clay, Nicholas, Cabell, Wayne, Boone, Logan, Wyoming, Webster, Fayette, and Raleigh, are now in insurrection and rebellion, and by reason thereof the civil authority of the United States is obstructed so that the provisions of the Act to provide increased revenue from imports to pay the interest on the public debt, and for other purposes, approved August fifth, eighteen hundred and sixty-one, cannot be peace ably exe
y, was formed on the left of the road. The Thirty-first brigade, Colonel Carlin, Thirty-eighth Illinois volunteers, commanding, composed of the Twenty-first and Thirty-eighth Illinois volunteers, commanded respectively by Col. Alexander. and Major Gilmer; the Fifteenth Wisconsin volunteers, Colonel Heg; the One Hundred and First Ohio volunteers, Colonel Stem; and two sections of Captain Hotchkiss's Second Minnesota battery, commanded by Lieut. Dawley, (Capt. Hotchkiss, with one section, being captured, on the edge of the town, a heavily loaded ammunition-train of fifteen wagons, two caissons, with their horses, belonging to the Washington light artillery, and the train-guard of one hundred and thirty-eight men with three officers. Major Gilmer, Thirty-eighth Illinois, deserves great credit for the skill and activity he displayed in this capture. The Thirty second brigade, Colonel Caldwell, was advanced at different times to the positions evacuated by Col. Carlin. The officers an
r of General Pettigrew, served in the same capacity, first at Raleigh, and then at Chimborazo. Mrs. Archibald Cary did effective service at Winder, where she was assisted by her daughter, later Mrs. Burton N. Harrison. The daughters of General Lee, Mrs. G. W. Randolph, and many others were frequent visitors to the Richmond hospitals, where they read to the convalescents, wrote letters for them, and fed them. Mrs. Felicia Grundy Porter, of Nashville, gave freely of her time and means; Mrs. Gilmer, of Pulaski, Tennessee, served as nurse and matron at various hospitals; Mrs. Ella Newsom, a wealthy young widow, left her home in Arkansas with a number of her own servants and went to the seat of war in the West, serving first at Memphis, then at Belmont, Bowling Green, Nashville, Atlanta, Corinth, and Chattanooga. Nor must the work of the Roman Catholic sisterhoods be neglected. The nursing in some of the hospitals was entirely under their charge. At others, they worked with nurse
r of General Pettigrew, served in the same capacity, first at Raleigh, and then at Chimborazo. Mrs. Archibald Cary did effective service at Winder, where she was assisted by her daughter, later Mrs. Burton N. Harrison. The daughters of General Lee, Mrs. G. W. Randolph, and many others were frequent visitors to the Richmond hospitals, where they read to the convalescents, wrote letters for them, and fed them. Mrs. Felicia Grundy Porter, of Nashville, gave freely of her time and means; Mrs. Gilmer, of Pulaski, Tennessee, served as nurse and matron at various hospitals; Mrs. Ella Newsom, a wealthy young widow, left her home in Arkansas with a number of her own servants and went to the seat of war in the West, serving first at Memphis, then at Belmont, Bowling Green, Nashville, Atlanta, Corinth, and Chattanooga. Nor must the work of the Roman Catholic sisterhoods be neglected. The nursing in some of the hospitals was entirely under their charge. At others, they worked with nurse
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 10. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Two foreign opinions of the Confederate cause and people. (search)
would hardly have been tolerated in a Southern bar. Or, again, take the favorites of the North--the best known names in the camp and Cabinet — Sheridan and Hunter, whose ravages recall the devastation of the Palatinate, political rowdies like Banks and Butler, braggarts like Pope and Hooker, or even professional soldiers like Meade, Sigel, Sherman. These are the household words of the North, and any one Southern chief of the second rank — Ewell, Early, Fitzhugh Lee, Hardee, Polk, Hampton, Gilmer, Gordon — alone outweighs them all. Needless to remind you that among the twenty millions--mostly fools--was no man whom even party spirit dared liken to the stern, simple Virginia professor, the Cavalier-Puritan, whose brigade of recruits stood like a stone wall under the convergent fire of artillery and rifles that was closing round them at Mannassas; no A. P. Hill, second only to Jackson among the lieutenants of Lee; no strategist comparable to him whose death by simple self-neglect marre<
mber9, 1843. 4,313.HenningDecember16, 1845. 7,738.BeniowskiOctober29, 1850. 9,418.HarmonNovember23, 1852. 9,974.MitchellAugust30, 1853. 10,656.BeaumontMarch21, 1854. 10,929.MitchellMay16, 1854. 13,710.LongboroughOctober23, 1855. 339.Longborough (reissued)January8, 1856. 15,310.KoenigJuly15, 1856. 16,743.MitchellMarch3, 1857. 16.947.HoustonMarch31, 1857. 18,175.AldenSeptember15, 1857. 3,572.Alden (reissued)July27, 1869. 18,264.MitchellSeptember22, 1857. No.Name.Date. 26,149.GilmerNovember15, 1859. 28,463.FeltMay29, 1860. 28,857.HargerJune26, 1860. 30,211.Dorsey and MathersOctober2, 1860. 34,265.RayJanuary28, 1862. 36,991.BrownNovember25, 1862. 38,955.FeltJune23, 1863. 52,073.PauldingJanuary16, 1866. 52,254.Allen and MackayJanuary23, 1866. 57,034.BaerAugust7, 1866. 59,786.Van GiesonNovember20, 1866. 04,200.Coney and HarperApril30, 1867. 71,610.HarperDecember3, 1867. 75,681.HoustonMarch17, 1868. 84,273.FosterNovember24, 1868. 85,251.SlingerlandDecember22,
tor, 2.345, 351; reflected to Exec. Com., 355; reports Emancipator perishing, 418; sacrifice to support Standard, 420. Giddings, Joshua Reed [1795-1864], 1.496.— Portrait in Autographs of Freedom, vol. 2, and in W. Buell's Sketch. Giles, William Branch [1762-1830], message on Walker's Appeal, 1.160, 161.—Letter from H. G. Otis, 1.161. Gill, John, Rev., 2.110. Gill, Richard W., prosecuting counsel against G., 1.168; argument, 171; card from G., 179. Gilman, W. & J., 1.55, 56. Gilmer, George R. [1790-1859], 1.60. Glittering generalities of Declaration of Independence, 1.141. God Speed the Right, 2.394. Goodell, William [1792-1878], career, 1.91; meets Lundy, 91, edits Nat. Philanthropist, 124, walks and talks with G., 124, at his Park St. Church address, 126; drops Colonization Soc., 299; edits Moral Daily Advertiser in N. Y., 338, 345, suggests counsel to G. in libel suit, 392; delegate Nat. A. S. Convention, 398, committeeman, 399, motions, 406, 413; literary
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