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Emilio, Luis F., History of the Fifty-Fourth Regiment of Massachusetts Volunteer Infantry , 1863-1865 7 3 Browse Search
Horace Greeley, The American Conflict: A History of the Great Rebellion in the United States of America, 1860-65: its Causes, Incidents, and Results: Intended to exhibit especially its moral and political phases with the drift and progress of American opinion respecting human slavery from 1776 to the close of the War for the Union. Volume II. 5 1 Browse Search
The Daily Dispatch: September 1, 1862., [Electronic resource] 4 0 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 8. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 4 2 Browse Search
The Photographic History of The Civil War: in ten volumes, Thousands of Scenes Photographed 1861-65, with Text by many Special Authorities, Volume 10: The Armies and the Leaders. (ed. Francis Trevelyan Miller) 4 0 Browse Search
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Massachusetts in the Army and Navy during the war of 1861-1865, vol. 2 4 0 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 9. (ed. Frank Moore) 4 0 Browse Search
Benson J. Lossing, Pictorial Field Book of the Civil War. Volume 2. 3 1 Browse Search
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 4. 3 1 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 11. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 3 1 Browse Search
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Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 4., Marching through Georgia and the Carolinas. (search)
Army owing to the careful discipline of the Twelfth Corps. It was originally the Fifth Corps (March, 1862), then it became the Second Corps, Army of Virginia (June, 1862), then the Twelfth Corps (September, 1862). The basis of it was Banks's old division, and Banks was its first commander. Mansfield commanded the corps at Antietam, where lie was killed and was succeeded by Slocum. The corps had as subordinate commanders such men as A. S. Williams, Charles S. Hamilton, John W. Geary, George H. Gordon, Ruger, Andrews, William Hawley, and the discipline they imparted continued to the end and affected other troops.--D. O. began to wear away as we better under-stood the important work to be done by the great army organizing around us, and of which we were to form a considerable part. A most interesting feature of these preparations was the reenlistment of the old three-years regiments. The two Potomac corps were consolidated, and we of the Twelfth who wore the bloody star were apprehe
Benson J. Lossing, Pictorial Field Book of the Civil War. Volume 2., Chapter 15: the Army of the Potomac on the Virginia Peninsula. (search)
n in front, escorted by cavalry and infantry, and with a rear-guard or covering force of cavalry and six pieces of artillery, under the command of General John P. Hatch. The vanguard was led by Colonel Dudley Donnelly, and the center by Colonel George H. Gordon. Just as the column had passed Cedar Creek, three miles from Strasburg, word came that the train had been attacked at Middletown, two miles farther on. The news was instantly followed by a host of frightened fugitives, refugees, and wldier, as he was, Ewell, who bivouacked within a mile and a half of Winchester, began operations to that end before the dawn. The equally vigilant Banks Richard S. Ewell. was on the alert, and at daylight his troops were in battle order. Colonel Gordon, commanding the right, was strongly posted on a ridge, a little south of the city, and Colonel Donnelly was in charge of the left. Near the center, the troops were well sheltered from their foes by stone walls. General Hatch (who was cut of
st Maryland regiment and Brockenbrough's battery, under Brig.-Gen. Geo. H. Stewart, and the 2d and 6th Virginia cavalry, under Col. Flournoy. On our side, Brig.-Gen. Gordon, in his official report, says: From the testimony of our signal officers, and from a fair estimate of the number in Rebel lines drawn up on the hights,in tile action. opposed to more than 20,000, flushed with victory, and confident that the day would witness the capture or destruction of our little army. Col. Geo. H. Gordon commanded our right; Col. Dudley Donnelly our left. Gen. Hatch, who had been cut off at Middletown, had just rejoined with his cavalry. Facing the enemy b and moved rapidly through Winchester, amid the deafening yells of their exulting pursuers, which were echoed with delirious frenzy by the Winchester Rebels. Gen. Gordon, in his official report, says: My retreating column suffered serious loss in the streets of Winchester: males and females vied with each other in increasi
ed men were tranferred to the Eleventh Massachusetts. Second Massachusetts Infantry. Ruger's Brigade — Williams's Division--Twelfth Corps. (1) Col. George H. Gordon; W. P., R. A., Bvt. Major-Gen. (2) Col. George L. Andrews; W. P., Bvt. Major-Gen. (3) Col. Samuel M. Quincy; Bvt. Brig. Gen. (4) Col. William Cogswell; 29, 1862. Proceeding immediately to Washington, it remained on duty there until April 19, 1863, when it moved to Suffolk, Va. It participated in the campaign of Gordon's Division, up the Peninsula in June, and in the Maryland march, soon after Gettysburg. From Warrenton, Va., the regiment went to Morris Island, S. C., arriving ed with Banks's Corps up the Shenandoah Valley, having been assigned to Williams's Division in which it remained without further transfer during the war. General George H. Gordon commanded the brigade. At Cedar Mountain, the regiment lost 17 killed, 66 wounded, and 25 missing; at Antietam, 27 killed and 173 wounded, out of 340
1 80 81 152 Thoburn's Eighth. Sept., ‘62 20th Connecticut 4 76 80 3 85 88 168 Williams's Twelfth. Sept, ‘62 21st Connecticut 5 55 60 1 114 115 175 Brooks's Eighteenth. Sept., ‘62 22d Connecticut Nine-months' service.         20 20 20 Gordon's Fourth. Peninsular Corps (1863). Nov., ‘62 23d Connecticut Nine-months' service. 1 10 11 2 46 48 59 Grover's Nineteenth. Nov., ‘62 24th Connecticut Nine-months' men.   16 16 2 57 59 75 Grover's Nineteenth. Nov., ‘62 25th Conne   Light Batteries.                   Oct., ‘61 1st Wis. Reenlisted and served through the war. Foster's   5 5 1 22 23 28 Osterhaus's Thirteenth. Oct., ‘61 2d Wis. Reenlisted and served through the war. Herzberg's         12 12 12 Gordon's Fourth, A. P. Oct., ‘61 3d Wis. Reenlisted and served through the war. Drury's   6 6   21 21 27 Van Cleve's Twenty-first. Oct., ‘61 4th Wis. Reenlisted and served through the war. Vallee's   3 3
f the column devolved upon the forces under Col. Gordon. The guard having been separated from thline was occupied by the Third brigade, Col. Geo. H. Gordon commanding. The regiments were stronglto commend the conduct of Col. Donnelly and Col. Gordon, commanding the two brigades. I would alsoMajor-General Commanding. Report of Brig.-General Gordon. headquarters Third brigade, camp p at Williamsport, Md., May 26, 1862. Colonel George H. Gordon, Commanding Third Brigade: sir: I Our forces, Donnelly's brigade on the left and Gordon's upon the right, were in position along a gorttack, cut traces, tipped wagons over, etc. Col. Gordon, with the Second Massachusetts, the Twenty- left of the road going out of Winchester. Col. Gordon placed his on a ridge on the right of the rlly's forces maintained their ground well. Col. Gordon's, which was on higher ground, and held theavy masses; were moving to flank our right, Col. Gordon ordered the Twenty-seventh Indiana and Twen[11 more...]
n regiment, Col. Woodbury, was sent to feel them, and, if necessary, interrupt their quiet. The regiment left camp at seven A. M., their Colonel at their head, and all in splendid spirits at the prospect of a rencontre with the rebels. A secondary object of the expedition was to obtain information in regard to the roads and fords in the vicinity. Lieut. N. Bowen, of the Topographical Engineers, went with the expedition, as also a squadron of the Second regular cavalry, under command of Capt. Gordon; a company of the Fifth cavalry, Lieut. Coster; a company of the Eighteenth infantry, Capt. Forsyth, and a company of the Second infantry, Capt. McMillen. New-Bridge is four miles from the camp. They went down the main road about two miles, to what is called the Old Mill, and thence turned to the right through a piece of woods, keeping it till they came to an open field, commanding a view of the Chickahominy River. A portion of company A, Fourth Michigan regiment, Capt. Rose, was here
d the advance of Gen. Banks--the brigade of Gen. Gordon being directed to change their position froia Campaign. Major-General Commanding. General Gordon's official report. headquarters Thirdh great respect, truly your ob't servant, Geo. H. Gordon, Brigadier-General Commanding Third Brigaear slaughter's Mt., Aug. 11, 1862. Brig.-Gen. Geo. H. Gordon, Commanding Third Brigade: In comivisions of infantry, including Crawford's and Gordon's brigades, made three most desperate bayonet-tood next, then Generals Geary, Crawford, and Gordon. Just after Gen. Green had taken his position ntain. The brigade of Generals Crawford and Gordon, occupying the extreme right, and fighting neais corps famous. Gens. Geary, Augur, Carroll, Gordon and Green behaved with distinguished gallantryto the right. Order it forward! Crawford and Gordon are coming up. Tell them to carry those woods idered dangerous. The same may be said of Colonel Gordon's and Lieutenant-Colonel Lightfoot's of Si[5 more...]
forward, and occupied the advance of Gen. Banks--the brigade of Gen. Gordon being directed to change their position from the right, and mass report of his Virginia Campaign. Major-General Commanding. General Gordon's official report. headquarters Third brigade, in the fielre. I am, sir, with great respect, truly your ob't servant, Geo. H. Gordon, Brigadier-General Commanding Third Brigade, First Division, Ss. Volunteers, camp near slaughter's Mt., Aug. 11, 1862. Brig.-Gen. Geo. H. Gordon, Commanding Third Brigade: In compliance with orders fur's and Williams's divisions of infantry, including Crawford's and Gordon's brigades, made three most desperate bayonet-charges upon the rebe left. Gen. Prince stood next, then Generals Geary, Crawford, and Gordon. Just after Gen. Green had taken his position on the left, and at n called Slaughter Mountain. The brigade of Generals Crawford and Gordon, occupying the extreme right, and fighting nearly all the time in t
lantry, and sustained the heaviest losses, but the conduct of the whole corps of General Banks was beyond all praise. Although I regret that General Banks thought it expedient to depart from my instructions, it gives me pleasure to bear testimony to his gallant and intrepid conduct throughout that action. He exposed himself as freely as any one under his command, and his example went far to secure that gallant and noble conduct which has made his corps famous. Gens. Geary, Augur, Carroll, Gordon and Green behaved with distinguished gallantry. Gen. Prince, who had led his brigade throughout the action with coolness and courage, was captured after dark while passing from one flank of his command to the other. As I have not received any report from Gen. Banks, it is not in my power to mention the field and company officers who distinguished themselves under his immediate eye in this action; but as soon as his report is received, I will transmit it to the Government, and endeavor to d
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