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Browsing named entities in Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 11. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones). You can also browse the collection for Frederick Grant or search for Frederick Grant in all documents.

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Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 11. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), The Virginia campaign of 1864-1865. (search)
the roll of great captains. On May 4, 1864, Grant crossed the Rapidan at the head of about 125,0General Humphreys. Secretary Stanton makes General Grant's effective force to have been over 141,00ost memorable of which occurred May 12th, when Grant threw the half of his army, under Hancock and ition taken up by Lee was so advantageous that Grant drew off without attack. The great disparity amous field of Cold Harbor. Here, on June 3d, Grant having been joined by 16,000 or 18,000 of Butle loss was probably not as many hundreds. General Grant's Medical Director puts the Federal loss fsals for peace. An ordinary commander, in General Grant's place, would have hesitated about continde of warfare on the south side of the James. Grant did not. He knew that Lee had been forced to de poured out without stint for its relief, and Grant was able, by a great preponderance of force, trom Petersburg, failed, and cost him heavily. Grant moved against Lee's right flank and communicat[9 more...]
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 11. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Diary of Rev. J. G. Law. (search)
shoulder arms and march to the scene of the conflict. Trusting not in Beauregard, nor in the valor of our troops, but in God, victory must perch upon our banners. Six o'clock P. M..—Have just halted for supper and a little rest, after a walk of ten miles. The incessant roar of artillery is still heard, and from the sick and wounded who are on their way to Corinth from the battle-field I learn that the Confederates, under General Albert Sidney Johnston, attacked the Federal army under General Grant this morning, and that our troops are driving the enemy with heavy loss on both sides. We have driven them out of their encampment, and have captured several batteries. This is glorious news. Will be off again in a few minutes, and hope to reach the field of battle some time to-night or early in the morning. The destiny of the Confederacy may hang upon the issue of this struggle. May God give us the victory April 8th.—Suffering from a slight wound received in battle yesterday, an
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 11. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), chapter 72 (search)
, a short distance in front of the railroad bridge, with its right resting on Lebanon pike. It will be remembered that General Joseph E. Johnston had been placed in command of this Confederate department, but did not engage in active field operations, and that also, not anticipating any attack from the enemy, had sent Generals Morgan and Forrest with their cavalry in different directions—the first to destroy Rosecrans's communications in Kentucky, the latter to harrass, cut off, and destroy Grant's line of communications; and also a division of infantry under General Stevenson had been sent to our army in Mississippi. Battle of Murfreesboroa. On the night of the 30th, the writer having a short time before resigned his commission in the line and accepted that of Assistant Adjutant General on General Walthall's (just promoted) staff, who at this juncture was on sick leave in Virginia, and his brigade temporarily commanded by General Patton Anderson, recently deceased, we receiv
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 11. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Notes and Queries. (search)
most of them saw that in its successful prosecution lay their future prosperity. The war time was a money-making process. The Federal Government was victorious simply because it had the most men and the most money. The Confederate cause failed simply because its men and money were exhausted; for no other reason. Inequality came to an end in the South; equality was established throughout the Union; but the real victors were the money-makers, merchants, bankers, manufacturers, railway men, monopolists, and speculators. It was their cause that had triumphed under the banner of freedom. General Grant has been roughly handled by caricaturists and paragraphists as a beggar. Verily, his reward has been small at the hands of those to whom he rendered his chief service. If the business men of the North had given him an income of one thousand dollars a day, and General Sherman one of five hundred, they would have insufficiently acknowledged what those stubborn soldiers did for them.
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 11. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), chapter 77 (search)
s of provisions had been accumulated inside of the works, munitions of war were scarce, and when Grant gave Pemberton Hobson's choice of surrendering on the 4th of July or a fight, he put on his litt the lower city. On my way I heard the rapid gallop of horses, and on looking behind me saw General Grant and staff, and at the tail end of the staff Fred. Grant in his shirt sleeves. General GrantFred. Grant in his shirt sleeves. General Grant's dark face, with its short, black, stubby beard, gave me the impression at the time that it was the face of a just but determined man. The moment I saw it I felt that our men would be treated well,General Grant's dark face, with its short, black, stubby beard, gave me the impression at the time that it was the face of a just but determined man. The moment I saw it I felt that our men would be treated well, that the mean, petty spite of the non-combatant leaders of the North would have no influence with him. Subsequent events proved the quality of the man, for he ordered a distribution of provisions w draw on, he also gave us bacon to butter our flour bread with. So, for this and other reasons, Grant was praised among the Confederates in a quiet way. It took about a week to fix up our parole pap
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 11. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), chapter 78 (search)
hnston and Bragg were acting on interior lines, between his own and Grant's armies, and it was for theirs, and not the Federal commander's innt times, so as to use the same force in turn against Rosecrans and Grant, his cherished military maxim, not to risk two great decisive battlone time, because he had accomplished his aim, and at the same time Grant had reduced Vicksburg. The government at Washington deemed it alrams to Generals Burnside, in East Tennessee; Hurlburt, at Memphis; Grant, or Sherman, at Vicksburg; also to General Schofield, in Missouri, which placed the Federal army almost in a starving condition. But Grant, with heavy reinforcements, having in the meantime arrived and assut position carried by Hooker, but it opened the way for him to join Grant in Chattanooga. began to put a new phase on the issue involved. tely accepted. General Bragg says in his letter of February 8th: Grant was so reduced that he could not recross the mountains, for his tro
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 11. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Death of General A. P. Hill. (search)
o yielded up his noble life on that last sad day at Petersburg, We are glad to be able to lay before our readers and put on record the story of his death, as told in the interesting narrative of Sergeant Tucker. It will be seen that General Hill, with a sick furlough in his pocket, returned to duty as soon as he learned that his grand old corps, which he had led so ably and successfully during the last campaign, was about to meet the enemy again, and that, after his lines were broken by Grant's overwhelming numbers, he lost his life in an attempt to reach and take personal command of the part of his corps which was cut off from the main army. He fell, where his gallant spirit was ever found, in the path of duty, and left behind a record luminous with heroic deeds for the land and cause he loved so well.] The tragic death of Ambrose Powell Hill ended pre-eminent services to the cause he had espoused with singleness of heart and maintained with unexcelled constancy of purpose
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