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Cambridge History of American Literature: volume 3 (ed. Trent, William Peterfield, 1862-1939., Erskine, John, 1879-1951., Sherman, Stuart Pratt, 1881-1926., Van Doren, Carl, 1885-1950.), Book III (continued) (search)
cerned with the eternal, as opposed to the diurnal, aspect of things. But while his standards were uncompromising, his style was gracious, courteous, tender even—as we should expect of a poet; and in such a series of papers as are included in his Gray days and Gold (1894) we see how great a part sentiment played in the life and writings of that brave antagonist of all the blatant and all the insidious influences which drag down the art of a nation. The past lured him with every manner of assoc doctrine of evolution, which subsumes not only the Christian religion but the entire nature of man under universal rubrics. At first this doctrine shocked not only the theological but also the scientific thinkers of America. Louis Agassiz and Asa Gray opposed it almost as vigorously as did Charles Hodge, who declared that a more absolutely incredible theory was never propounded for acceptance among men. The burden of his logical and able What is Darwinism? (1874) is expressed in these sente
Cambridge History of American Literature: volume 3 (ed. Trent, William Peterfield, 1862-1939., Erskine, John, 1879-1951., Sherman, Stuart Pratt, 1881-1926., Van Doren, Carl, 1885-1950.), Index (search)
479 Grammatical Institute of the English language, 400, 475 Grand Canyon, the, 157 Grand d'espagne, 592 Grandfather's chair, 416 Granny, 284 Granny Maumee, 267 Grant, Julia Dent, 454 Grant, U. S., 3, 5, 22, 182, 326, 352 Gray, Asa, 209 Gray days and Gold, 128 Grayson, W. J., 342 Graysons, the, 76 Great divide, the, 62, 275, 290, 291, 293 Great error of American agriculture exposed, the, 432 Great rebellion, 352 Great Salt Lake Trail, the, 133 Greece, ancGray days and Gold, 128 Grayson, W. J., 342 Graysons, the, 76 Great divide, the, 62, 275, 290, 291, 293 Great error of American agriculture exposed, the, 432 Great rebellion, 352 Great Salt Lake Trail, the, 133 Greece, ancient and modern, 460 Greek and English Lexicon, 449 Greek grammar (Goodwin, W. W.), 465 Greek grammar (Hadley), 465 Greek grammar (Hadley, J.), 462 Greek grammar (Sophocles), 461 Greek Lexicon of the Roman and Byzantine periods, 461 Greek moods and tenses, 464 Greeley, Horace, 40, 45, 46, 181, 322, 324, 331, 415, 437 Greely, A. W., 169 Green, Anna Katharine, (Mrs. Rohlfs), 86 Green, Samuel, 533 Green, T. H., 239, 254 Green, W. H., 206, 207 Greene, G. W., 489 G
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Carlyle's laugh and other surprises, chapter 13 (search)
werful voice, ready sympathy, and boundless willingness to make himself useful in every direction. A very characteristic side of the man might always be seen in his letters. The following was written in his own hurried handwriting in recognition of his seventy-seventh birthday :-- April 8, 1899. Dear Higginson,--Thanks for your card. It awaited me on my return from North Carolina last night. Three score & ten as you know, has many advantages,--and as yet, I find no drawbacks. Asa Gray said to me It is great fun to be 70 years old. You do not have to know everything! I see that you can write intelligibly. I wish I could — But I cannot run a Typewriter more than a Sewing-Machine. Will the next generation learn to write — any more than learn the alphabet? With Love to all yours Truly & always E. E. Hale. This next letter was called out by the death of Major-General Rufus Saxton, distinguished for his first arming of the freed slaves-- Washington, D. C.,
Cambridge sketches (ed. Estelle M. H. Merrill), chapter 11 (search)
oth library and Herbarium are a legacy from Dr. Asa Gray. Dr. Gray began his herbarium in early lDr. Gray began his herbarium in early life. During his service at Harvard he occupied the large house within the Garden at the top of the hill, still the home of Mrs. Gray. Roomy though the house was, it became overrun with pressed flownd fills the space between the hothouses and Mrs. Gray's residence. Within is ample room for the hhlets, some almost unique. It was originally Dr. Gray's private library, and he started it so earlyth the great writer's name on the fly leaf. Mrs. Gray is arranging a large collection of autographs an inkstand which was used constantly by Professor Gray. He had asked Sir Joseph Hooker, the Englhad been long used by Bentham. Near this are Dr. Gray's dissecting microscopes, and the trowel he uf portraits at the Herbarium. This, too, was Dr. Gray's private collection. There are portraits ofatter is an oil painting. done expressly for Dr. Gray b-an artist who knew Linnaeus. Dr. Gray hims[1 more...]
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Irene E. Jerome., In a fair country, April days (search)
e disk which is common with this species, but technically and horticulturally double, like the double-flowering almond or cherry,—with the most exquisitely delicate little petals, like fairy lace-work. He had three specimens, and gave one to Prof. Asa Gray, of Harvard, who said it was almost or quite unexampled, and another to me. As the man in the fable says of the chameleon,—I have it yet and can produce it. Now comes the marvel. The next winter L. went to New York for a year, and wrote though it is known that not the maple only, but the birch and the walnut even, afford it in appreciable quantities. Along our maritime rivers the people associate April, not with sugaring, but with shadding. The pretty Amelanchier Canadensis of Gray—the Aronia of Whittier's song—is called Shad-bush, or Shad-blow, in Essex County, from its connection with this season; and there is a bird known as the Shad-spirit, which I take to be identical with the flicker or golden-winged woodpecker, whose
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Irene E. Jerome., In a fair country, The procession of the flowers (search)
is the fact, now well known, that salt-water plants still flower beside the Great Lakes, yet dreaming of the time when those waters were briny as the sea! Nothing in the demonstrations of Geology seem grander than the light lately thrown by Professor Gray, from the analogies between the flora of Japan and of North America, upon the successive epochs of heat which led the wandering flowers along the Arctic lands, and of cold which isolated them once more. Yet doubtless these humble movements Thoreau,—to-morrow, in these parts, meaning about the twentieth of May. It belongs to the family of Orchids, a high-bred race, fastidious in habits, sensitive as to abodes. Of the ten species named as rarest among American endogenous plants by Dr. Gray, in his valuable essay on the statistics of our Northern Flora, all but one are Orchids. Even an abundant species, like the present, retains the family traits in its person, and never loses its high-born air and its delicate veining. I know a
Elizabeth Cary Agassiz, Louis Agassiz: his life and correspondence, third edition, Chapter 13: 1846: Aet. 39. (search)
, of whom my uncle will no doubt have given you news, since I wrote to him. Obliged to continue my road in order to join Mr. Gray at Princeton I stopped but one day in New York, the greater part of which I passed with Mr. Redfield, author of a paper iate type between the primitive fishes of the ancient deposits and the more regular forms of the jurassic deposits. Mr. Asa Gray, professor of botany at Cambridge, near Boston, had offered to accompany me on my journey to Washington. We were to mn tropical regions, the collections of birds and mammals, which fell to the charge of Mr. Peale, are less considerable. Mr. Gray tells me, however, that the botanical collections are very large. More precious, perhaps, than all the collections are t would be safest to send them to the care of Auguste Mayor. At Philadelphia I separated from my traveling companion, Mr. Gray, who was obliged to return to his home. From Philadelphia, Mr. Haldeman and Mr. Lea accompanied me to Bristol, where Mr
Elizabeth Cary Agassiz, Louis Agassiz: his life and correspondence, third edition, Chapter 14: 1846-1847: Aet. 39-40. (search)
working up the articulates of the Wilkes Expedition. Wyman, recently made professor at Cambridge, is an excellent comparative anatomist, and the author of several papers on the organization of fishes. . . . The botanists are less numerous, but Asa Gray and Dr. Torrey are known wherever the study of botany is pursued. Gray, with his indefatigable zeal, will gain upon his competitors. . . . The geologists and mineralogists form the most numerous class among the savans of the country. The fact Gray, with his indefatigable zeal, will gain upon his competitors. . . . The geologists and mineralogists form the most numerous class among the savans of the country. The fact that every state has its corps of official geologists has tended to develop study in this direction to the detriment of other branches, and will later, I fear, tend to the detriment of science itself; for the utilitarian tendency thus impressed on the work of American geologists will retard their progress. With us, on the contrary, researches of this kind constantly tend to assume a more and more scientific character. Still, the body of American geologists forms, as a whole, a most respectable
Elizabeth Cary Agassiz, Louis Agassiz: his life and correspondence, third edition, Chapter 15: 1847-1850: Aet. 40-43. (search)
He could hardly have come to Harvard at a more auspicious moment, so far as his social and personal relations were concerned. The college was then on a smaller scale than now, but upon its list of professors were names which would have given distinction to any university. In letters, there were Longfellow and Lowell, and Felton, the genial Greek scholar, of whom Longfellow himself wrote, In Attica thy birthplace should have been. In science, there were Peirce, the mathematician, and Dr. Asa Gray, then just installed at the Botanical Garden, and Jeffries Wyman, the comparative anatomist, appointed at about the same time with Agassiz himself. To these we might almost add, as influencing the scientific character of Harvard, Dr. Bache, the Superintendent of the Coast Survey, and Charles Henry Davis, the head of the Nautical Almanac, since the kindly presence of the former was constantly invoked as friend and counselor in the scientific departments, while the latter had his residence
Elizabeth Cary Agassiz, Louis Agassiz: his life and correspondence, third edition, Chapter 21: 1865-1868: Aet. 58-61. (search)
o the latest geological catastrophes. As you have seen so many North American Indians, you will be able to give interesting explanations of their somatic relations to the South American Indians. Why could you not send me, as secretary of the mathematical and physical section, a short report of your principal results? It would then be printed in the report of our meetings, which, as the forerunner of other publications, could hardly fail to be agreeable to you. You no doubt see our friend Asa Gray occasionally. Remember me cordially to him, and tell him I look eagerly for an answer to my last letter. The year ‘sixty-six has taken from us many eminent botanists, Gusone, Mettenius, Von Schlechtendal, and Fresenius. I hear but rarely from our excellent friend Alexander Braun. He does not resist the approach of old age so well as you, my dear friend. You are still the active naturalist, fresh and well preserved, to judge by your photograph. Thank you for it; I send mine in return.
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