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Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 3., The capture of Port Hudson. (search)
s soon as they should meet. On the 16th General Grover, with 12 regiments and a battery, without etachment which had been posted there, and General Grover quietly took possession. The town was hels Thomas W. Sherman, William H. Emory, and Cuvier Grover. Each division was composed of three brigMarch, with the divisions of Augur, Emory, and Grover, for the purpose of cooperating with the fleetment. So few were the facilities that it took Grover two days to embark. Six hours more were lost emy's attention, while he listened in vain for Grover's guns, which were to have been the signal forned attack in front. At night, knowing that Grover's movement must certainly have been seen and r, and no sound of battle coming from his left, Grover determined to wait where he was for the attackt. The next day a regular siege was begun. Grover was assigned to the command of the right wing,nville to drive Taylor out of the La Fourche. Grover followed. On the 13th, at Koch's plantation, [9 more...]
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 3., The opposing forces at Port Hudson, La.: May 23d-July 8th, 1863. (search)
684. Third Brigade, Col. Oliver P. Gooding: 31st Mass. (7 co's), Lieut.-Col. W. S. B. Hopkins; 38th Mass., Lieut.-Col. William L. Rodman (k), Maj. James P. Richardson; 53d Mass., Col. John W. Kimball; 156th N. Y., Col. Jacob Sharpe. Brigade loss: k, 48; w, 265; m, 8 = 321. Artillery, Capt. Richard C. Duryea: 4th Mass., Lieut. Frederick W. Reinhard; F, 1st U. S., Capt. Richard C. Duryea; 2d Vt., Capt. Pythagoras E. Holcomb. Artillery loss: k, 1; w, 4; m, 2 = 7. Fourth division, Brig.-Gen. Cuvier Grover. First Brigade, Col. Richard E. Holcomb (k), Col. Joseph S. Morgan: 1st La., Lieut.-Col. William O. Fiske; 22d Me., Col. Simon G. Jerrard; 90th N. Y., Col. Joseph S. Morgan; Maj. Nelson Shaurman; 91st N. Y., Col. Jacob Van Zandt; 131st N. Y., Lieut.-Col. Nicholas W. Day. Brigade loss: k, 84; w, 359; m, 27 =470. Second Brigade, Col. William K. Kimball: 24th Conn., Col. Samuel M. Mansfield; 12th Me., Lieut.-Col. Edward Ilsley; 52d Mass., Col. Halbert S. Greenleaf. Brigade loss: k,
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 4., The Red River campaign. (search)
made. The following summer, even after the Red River failure, General Grant considered that he would be strengthened by having Franklin to command the right wing of his army [see p. 106].--R. B. I. His forces consisted of Emory's division, and Grover's two brigades of the Nineteenth Corps, about 10,500 strong, Cameron's and Ransom's divisions of the Thirteenth Corps, about 4800, and the newly organized division of cavalry and newly mounted infantry, under Brigadier-General Albert L. Lee, numbrger transports staid below; the only communication with the upper fleet was by the road around the falls; all supplies had therefore to be landed, hauled round in wagons, and reshipped; and this made it necessary to establish depots and to leave Grover's division, four thousand strong, at Alexandria for the protection of the stores and the carry. At the same time General McPherson, commanding the Seventeenth Corps, recalled Ellet's Marine Brigade to Vicksburg, and thus the expedition lost a se
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 4., The opposing forces in the Red River campaign. (search)
h N. Y., Lieut.-Col. Gouverneur Carr; 173d N. Y., Col. Lewis M. Peck. Artillery, Capt. George T. Hebard: 25th N. Y., Lieut. Irving D. Southworth; L, 1st U. S., Lieut. Franck E. Taylor; 1st Vt., Capt. George T. Hebard. Second division, Brig.-Gen. Cuvier Grover. First Brigade, Joined the army at Alexandria (from New Orleans) after the battle of Pleasant Hill. Brig.-Gen. F. S. Nickerson. Second Brigade, Brig.-Gen. Henry W. Birge, Also commanded at Monette's Ferry a temporary division of his 31,303 officers and men, viz.: Headquarters, 67; Engineers, 721; 13th Corps, 4773; 19th Corps, 10,619; Corps d'afrique, 1535; Cavalry, 4653,--total Army of the Gulf, 22,368; detachment Army of the Tennessee, 8935,--grandtotal, 31,303. Deducting Grover's division left at Alexandria (3846), and Kilby Smith's division, which moved with the fleet (1721), it will be seen that the marching column consisted on the 31st of March of 25,736 officers and men of all arms. In his official report Banks s
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 4., Sheridan in the Shenandoah Valley. (search)
the breach on Emory's left, and, striking the flank of the Confederate troops who were pursuing Grover, restored the lines and stayed the Confederate advance. General Emory, in his official narrative, says of the action on the right at this point: Grover's division was placed in line of battle on the right of the Sixth Corps, and Dwight's division was placed in ├ęchelon on the right of GrGrover's. Not many minutes elapsed before receiving orders to charge the enemy. I ordered Grover's division to charge, holding Dwight's in reserve. The charge was made with great bravery, dispersing tGrover's division to charge, holding Dwight's in reserve. The charge was made with great bravery, dispersing the enemy's first line; but this first success seemed to throw our men off their guard, and give them too much confidence, and they rushed, without orders, with impetuosity upon the second line of the ickly drawing a brigade of Dwight's division from the right, I placed it on the line occupied by Grover's division, behind which that division rallied in good order, considering the terrible repulse t
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 4., The opposing forces at Cedar Creek, Va., Oct. 19, 1864. (search)
Gobin; 8th Vt., Maj. John B. Mead, Capt. Moses McFarland, Col. Stephen Thomas. Brigade loss: k, 85; w, 246; m, 167 = 498. Third Brigade (guarding wagon trains, and not engaged in the battle), Col. Leonard D. H. Currie: 30th Me,. Col. Thomas H. Hubbard; 133d N. Y., Maj. Anthony J. Allaire; 162d N. Y., Col. Justus W. Blanchard; 165th N. Y. (6 companies), Lieut.-Col. Gouverneur Carr; 173d N. Y., Maj. George W. Rogers. Artillery: 5th N. Y., Capt. Elijah D. Taft. Second division, Brig.-Gen. Cuvier Grover (w), Brig.-Gen. Henry W. Birge. Staff loss: w, 1. First Brigade, Brig.-Gen. Henry W. Birge, Col. Thomas W. Porter: 9th Conn. (batt'n), Capt. John G. Healy; 12th Me., Lieut.-Col. Edwin Ilsley; 14th Me., Col. Thomas W. Porter, Capt. John K. Laing; 26th Mass. (batt'n), Lieut. John S. Cooke; 14th N. H., Capt. Theodore A. Ripley, Capt. Oliver H. Marston; 75th N. Y., Maj. Benjamin F. Thurber. Brigade loss: k, 28; w, 152; m, 169 =349. Second Brigade, Col. Edward L. Molineux: 13th Conn
Benson J. Lossing, Pictorial Field Book of the Civil War. Volume 2., Chapter 3: military operations in Missouri and Kentucky. (search)
inner line of the intrenchments, and refused to fight any longer. Then Becker again raised the white flag, for he was satisfied that resistance was utterly vain, to which conclusion Mulligan and his officers speedily arrived. Colonel Mulligan, who had been twice wounded, now called a council of officers, and it was decided that the garrison must surrender. That act was performed. The officers were held as prisoners of war, These were Colonels Mulligan, Marshall, White, Peabody, and Grover, and Major Van Horn, and 118 other commissioned officers. whilst the private soldiers, for whom Price had no food to spare, were paroled. The victor held all arms and equipments as lawful prize. The spoils were 6 cannon, 2 mortars, over 3,000 stand of infantry arms, a large number of sabers, about 750 horses, many sets of cavalry equipments, wagons, teams, ammunition, and $100,000 worth of commissary stores.--See General Price's Report to Governor Jackson, September 24th, 1861. In additi
Benson J. Lossing, Pictorial Field Book of the Civil War. Volume 2., Chapter 15: the Army of the Potomac on the Virginia Peninsula. (search)
g distance of him, and the bulk of the Potomac Army within four hours march, Hooker made an immediate advance upon the Confederate works, believing that he could sustain a conflict until aid might reach him, if needed. At half-past 7 o'clock General Grover was directed to make the attack, by sending into the felled timber the First Massachusetts on the left, and the Second New Hampshire on the right, with orders to skirmish up to the verge of the open fields, to pick off the Confederate sharp-ster than the hitherto tardy movements of McClellan had given reason to expect. These were fresh and strong, and Hooker was compelled to send the First Massachusetts. and Seventieth and Seventy-second New York (Excelsior Brigade), under Brigadier-general Grover, to the aid of Patterson. In the mean time the Eleventh Pennsylvania and Twenty-sixth Massachusetts had reached the Yorktown road, and Colonel Blaisdell, who led them, was directed to clear that way for the advance of the National force
Benson J. Lossing, Pictorial Field Book of the Civil War. Volume 2., Chapter 16: the Army of the Potomac before Richmond. (search)
Samuel P. Heintzelman. Keyes's and Sumner's, was ordered to move forward on the Williamsburg road, through a swampy wood, for the purpose, the commanding general said, to ascertain the nature of the ground beyond, and to place Generals Heintzelman and Sumner in a position to support the attack intended to be made on the Old Tavern on the 26th or 27th, by General Franklin, by assailing that position in the rear. The movement was made, a fight ensued, in which the brigades of Sickles and Grover, of Hooker's division, bore the brunt, assisted by Kearney, and resulted in a loss to the Nationals of five hundred and sixteen men killed and wounded. This is called the battle of Oak Grove. General McClellan reported that the coveted point was gained with very little loss, and that the enemy were driven from their camp. On returning from overlooking the affair at the Oak Grove, McClellan telegraphed to the Secretary of War, that contrabands had just informed him that Jackson was at or
Benson J. Lossing, Pictorial Field Book of the Civil War. Volume 2., Chapter 17: Pope's campaign in Virginia. (search)
oking toward Manassas Junction, the place of which is indicated by the two birds. The single bird to the right indicates Groveton. Returning, we passed near Chinn's House, in which Colonel Broadhead, wounded in this vicinity, died; also the Pittsylvania House, and the store-house of Mr. Mathews, mentioned in the account of the battle of Bull's Run, in volume I. These were among the few houses in that region which had survived the war. Reno. It was desperate and gallant on both sides. Grover's brigade of Hooker's division penetrated two of Jackson's lines by a bayonet charge, and after a severe hand to hand struggle got possession of the railway embankment on the Confederate left, but at the cost of Thirty per cent. Of its force. Kearney, meanwhile, had struck Jackson's left at the point occupied by A. P. Hill, doubled his flank upon his center, and assisted Hooker in. Holding the railway intrenchment for a time. This was a critical moment for the Confederates, for their ammun
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