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er division facing toward Centreville. At noon, however, as I had ascertained that Centreville was evacuated by the enemy, I followed with these troops to assist Brig.-General Milroy and Colonel McLean, who, under the direction of Brig.-General Schenck, was briskly engaged with the left of the enemy's forces, whose right had engaged a brigade of the Third corps. Our artillery advanced steadily until the darkness of the night interrupted their movements. They encamped for the night near Mrs. Harvey's farm--one regiment having taken possession of the Centreville-Gainesville turnpike, the main force fronting toward Sudley's Spring and Groveton. Battle at Groveton, near Bull Run, on Friday, August 29, 1862. On Thursday night, August 28, when the First corps was encamped on the heights, south of Young's Branch, near Bull Run, I received orders to attack the enemy vigorously the next morning. I accordingly made the necessary preparations at night, and formed in order of battle at
er division facing toward Centreville. At noon, however, as I had ascertained that Centreville was evacuated by the enemy, I followed with these troops to assist Brig.-General Milroy and Colonel McLean, who, under the direction of Brig.-General Schenck, was briskly engaged with the left of the enemy's forces, whose right had engaged a brigade of the Third corps. Our artillery advanced steadily until the darkness of the night interrupted their movements. They encamped for the night near Mrs. Harvey's farm--one regiment having taken possession of the Centreville-Gainesville turnpike, the main force fronting toward Sudley's Spring and Groveton. Battle at Groveton, near Bull Run, on Friday, August 29, 1862. On Thursday night, August 28, when the First corps was encamped on the heights, south of Young's Branch, near Bull Run, I received orders to attack the enemy vigorously the next morning. I accordingly made the necessary preparations at night, and formed in order of battle at
nding of the troops in the other boats was effected without difficulty, and during the whole time not an armed rebel was seen. None of the boats of the Monongahela were capsized. One of the schooners belonging to the fleet drifted from the channel and struck on the bar off Brazos Santiago. A boat's crew was immediately sent to her assistance from the McClellan. The executive officer, Mr. Comstock, was in charge, Captain Phillips, coast pilot, Mr. McHood, Master of Transportation, and Mr. Harvey, Quartermaster of the McClellan, were also in the boat, together with five sailors. Besides rescuing the schooner, it was intended that range lights should be placed on the bar, so that vessels could cross in the night. While running a hawser from the General Banks to the schooner, the boat capsized in the surf, and as she floated, bottom up, among the breakers, every man succeeded in clinging to it. This occurred about five o'clock. The General Banks could not assist them, as she had no
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 8. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Battle of Gettysburg. (search)
d and wounded, and between 800 and 900 prisoners in our hands. The enemy was pushed through Gettysburg to the heights beyond, when I received an order to halt and form line of battle in a street in Gettysburg running east and west. To Colonel Parker, Thirtieth North Carolina; Colonel Bennett, Nineteenth North Carolina; Colonel Grimes, Fourth North Carolina, and Major Hurt, Second North Carolina, my thanks are due for the skill and gallantry displayed by them in this day's fight. Lieutenant Harvey, Fourteenth North Carolina sharpshooters, commanding sharpshooters, deserves especial praise for his daring conduct. He whipped a Yankee regiment (150th Pennsylvania) with his sharpshooters, and took their regimental colors from them with his own hands. Colonel Battle, with the Third Alabama, rendered brilliant and invaluable service; attaching his regiment to my command, on his own responsibility, he came in at the right place, at the right time, and in the right way. July 2d
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 8. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Report of operations of Bratton's brigade from May 7th, 1864 to January, 1865. (search)
han fifteen--prisoners none. We destroyed of the enemy, in killed, wounded and prisoners, in my judgment, at least three thousand (3,000). They left about 500 dead in my front, and it is known that they took many dead from the field (all of those remote from our lines). My officers and men behaved to my entire satisfation. The men fired with cool deliberation and great effectiveness. While all behaved well, I cannot pass on from this part of my report without making special mention of Captain Harvey, Fifth South Carolina Volunteers and Captain Wood, First South Carolina regiment. They commanded the skirmishers of their respective regiments in the charge upon the enemy, and executed their orders with an energy and boldness that was worthy of all praise. Not long before sunset I was ordered to report to General Ewell on the right without delay. I moved down as rapidly as possible and found General Ewell in rear of that portion of the line which had been taken from Johnson's divisio
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 9. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Operations of the cavalry in Mississippi, from January to March, 1864.-report of General S. D. Lee. (search)
fficer, with his select band, attacked the vastly superior force of the enemy with a boldness and daring I have not witnessed before during the war. The advance was checked and many lives saved by the good conduct of that officer and the two companies. I regret to state that in effecting the object for which he was sent, he received a mortal wound, and is now lost to his country. A more daring spirit has not fallen during the war, nor one who has been more regretted by his comrades. Lieutenant Harvey, comanding scouts of Starke's brigade (40 in number), killed and captured 150 of the enemy, and he has established an enviable reputation for gallantry and efficiency. To the members of my personal staff, I am indebted for their gallantry and efficiency. I would particularly mention Major William Elliott, Assistant Adjutant-General, and Lieutenants J. D. McFarland, S. M. Underhill and N. S. Farish, Acting Aides. Major G. B. Dyer, C. S., and A. G. Quaite, Quarter-master, performed t
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 9. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Sherman's advance on Meridian — report of General W. H. Jackson. (search)
effect was to confine them closely to the road on which they were moving. I beg leave to call the attention of Major-General Lee to the part performed by Lieutenant Harvey and his gallant band of forty scouts; he was everywhere doing good service, killed and captured of the enemy four times his own number. His daring coolness m February 4th to March 4th was as follows: Killed, wounded and missing, 49. I captured and killed 128 Federal officers and men. Enclosed you will find Lieutenant Harvey's (commanding my scouts) report of operations during the raid. There were many instances of personal gallantry in the different skirmishes, but the behaviy such courage and determination in holding every position assigned them, against overwhelming numbers, that I will make no discrimination in this report. Lieutenant Harvey's report shows that he brought to bear his usual undaunted courage and extraordinary energy and judgment. I am, Captain, very respectfully, P. B. Starke,
Frederick H. Dyer, Compendium of the War of the Rebellion: Regimental Histories, Wisconsin Volunteers. (search)
20, 1865. Battery lost during service 3 Enlisted men killed and mortally wounded and 25 Enlisted men by disease. Total 28. 11th Wisconsin Independent Battery Light Artillery Organized with 17th Wisconsin Infantry at Madison, Wis., February 22, 1862. Transferred to 1st Illinois Light Artillery as Battery L February, 1862. (See Battery L, 1st Illinois Light Artillery.) 12th Wisconsin Independent Battery Light Artillery Organized at St. Louis, Mo., under authority of Governor Harvey, as a Company for the 1st Missouri Light Artillery, to be known as the 12th Wisconsin Battery February and March, 1862. Moved to Hamburg Landing, Tenn., May 6, 1862. Attached to Artillery Division, Army of Mississippi, to September, 1862. Artillery, 3rd Division, Army of Mississippi, to November, 1862. Artillery, 7th Division, Left Wing, 13th Army Corps (Old), Dept. of the Tennessee, to December, 1862. Artillery, 7th Division, 16th Army Corps, to January, 1863. Artille
Emilio, Luis F., History of the Fifty-Fourth Regiment of Massachusetts Volunteer Infantry , 1863-1865, Roster of the Fifty-Fourth Massachusetts Infantry. (search)
borer; Montgomery. 30 Nov 63; died 15 Je 65 Gen. Hos. Beaufort, S. C. Typhoid Fever. $325. Washington, Josiah 18, sin.; farmer; Boonsboro, Md. 6 May 63; 20 Aug. 65. $50. Watson, Jacob Sergt. 20, mar.; butcher; Mercersburg, Pa. 6 May 63; 20 Aug. 65. $50. weaver, George 29, mar.; laborer; Mt. Healthy, O. 5 May 63; 29 Jly 64 Morris Id, S. C. dis. Wounded 16 Jly 63 James Id. S. C. $50. Mt. Healthy, O. Wentworth, Charles B. 21, —— —— Woodstock, Vt. 14 Dec. 63; 20 Aug 65. —— white, Harvey 21, sin.; laborer; Toledo, O. 5 May 63; 20 Aug 65. Wounded 18 Jly 63 Ft. Wagner. $50. Williams, Cyrus. 18, —— —— Rutland, Vt. 20 Nov 63; 20 Aug 65. —— Rutland, Vt. Williams, Edward 18, sin.; laborer; New York. 3 May 63; 1 Jly 64 Morris Id, S. C; dis. Wounded 18 Jly 63 Ft. Wagner. $50. Williams, Neff 21, sin.; laborer; Paris, Tenn. 5 May 63; 1 Sep 65 New York. Wounded 18 Apl 65 Boykins Mills, S. C. $50. Williams, Norman B. 29, —— —— Woodstock, Vt. 20 N
e following report of my capture and subsequent attempted murder is respectfully submitted for your information: I was captured on the twentieth December, fourteen miles in a south-eastern direction from Murfreesboroa, in company with two other officers, Lieutenant D. G. Cooke, Seventeenth United States colored infantry, and Captain C. G. Penfield, Forty-fourth United States colored infantry, by a company of scouts belonging to Forrest's command, numbering thirty-six men, commanded by Captain Harvey. As soon as captured we were robbed of everything of any value, even to clothing. We were kept under guard for three days with some other prisoners (private soldiers of General Steadman's division, who were captured near Murfreesboroa), until we reached a small town called Lewisburg, some eighteen miles south of Duck river. There the officers were sent under a guard of four men to report, as I supposed, to General Forrest's headquarters. The guards told us that was their destination
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