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Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 33. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 12 2 Browse Search
A Roster of General Officers , Heads of Departments, Senators, Representatives , Military Organizations, &c., &c., in Confederate Service during the War between the States. (ed. Charles C. Jones, Jr. Late Lieut. Colonel of Artillery, C. S. A.) 8 0 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 6. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 6 0 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 22. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 5 1 Browse Search
The Photographic History of The Civil War: in ten volumes, Thousands of Scenes Photographed 1861-65, with Text by many Special Authorities, Volume 10: The Armies and the Leaders. (ed. Francis Trevelyan Miller) 4 0 Browse Search
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War: Volume 2. 3 3 Browse Search
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 3. 3 3 Browse Search
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War: The Opening Battles. Volume 1. 3 1 Browse Search
George Meade, The Life and Letters of George Gordon Meade, Major-General United States Army (ed. George Gordon Meade) 2 0 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 30. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 1 1 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Jubal Anderson Early, Ruth Hairston Early, Lieutenant General Jubal A. Early , C. S. A.. You can also browse the collection for Harry T. Hays or search for Harry T. Hays in all documents.

Your search returned 181 results in 25 document sections:

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Jubal Anderson Early, Ruth Hairston Early, Lieutenant General Jubal A. Early , C. S. A., Chapter 18: battle of Fredericksburg. (search)
t distance and then into the woods on my left. Hays' brigade was on my right, with Trimble's brigad was ordered to move his brigade to the left of Hays, but before he got into position, I received a vance to the front with the whole division, and Hays' brigade was at once ordered forward in supportse of resting and replenishing its ammunition. Hays' brigade, which had advanced in rear of Hoke, hing in confusion before my advancing brigades. Hays was posted in rear of Hoke for the purpose of stheir positions on the front until night, while Hays retained his position immediately in rear of Ho brigade being in the rear, and that Hoke's and Hays' brigades and the 13th Georgia were the only trgade and the 13th Georgia in front, followed by Hays' brigade. The programme was that a number of pefore dawn on the 14th, Paxton relieved Walker, Hays took the position which Paxton vacated, Hoke rele was in killed 89 and wounded 639, to-wit: in Hays' brigade, 5 killed and 40 wounded; Trimble's br
Jubal Anderson Early, Ruth Hairston Early, Lieutenant General Jubal A. Early , C. S. A., Chapter 19: operations in winter and Spring, 1862-63. (search)
ed attached to the division under the command of Captain W. F. Randolph, but it was transferred in the spring to General Jackson's headquarters. My division, as it remained after the changes above mentioned, was composed of four brigades, to-wit: Hays' Louisiana brigade, Hoke's North Carolina brigade, Lawton's Georgia brigade (commanded by Colonel Evans), and Smith's Virginia brigade, organized as follows: Hays' brigade: 5th, 6th, 7th, 8th, and 9th Louisiana Regiments. Hoke's brigade: 6Hays' brigade: 5th, 6th, 7th, 8th, and 9th Louisiana Regiments. Hoke's brigade: 6th, 21st, 54th, and 57th North Carolina Regiments and Wharton's North Carolina battalion. Lawton's brigade: 13th, 26th, 31st, 38th, 60th, and 61st Georgia Regiments. Smith's brigade: 13th, 31st, 49th, 52nd, and 58th Virginia Regiments. In a few days after the battle, the other divisions of Jackson's corps were moved to positions above me, covering the river from the mouth of Massaponix to my left, Jackson's old division being on my immediate left, then A. P. Hill's division, and then
Jubal Anderson Early, Ruth Hairston Early, Lieutenant General Jubal A. Early , C. S. A., Chapter 20: battle of Chancellorsville. (search)
discovered by the enemy. I determined to leave Hays' brigade to occupy the hills in rear of Frederi road. Barksdale occupied his old position and Hays' returned during the night to the right of my lperson to request reinforcements, and I ordered Hays' brigade to return to the left as soon as possi's position and found his line established with Hays and Gordon in position. It had been now ascn the rear, forming a second line, and to throw Hays' and Hoke's brigades across Hazel Run opposite son's force began to arrive, I was able to draw Hays and Hoke nearer to my right, and I therefore brought Hays' brigade across the branch of Hazel Run, which has been mentioned, and put his brigade ins, pushed on across the Plank road, encountered Hays' brigade in the woods still advancing, and the tinued to advance, getting far into the woods. Hays' brigade pressed on in its proper direction, bud placed on line with Gordon's on its left, and Hays' brigade was moved back and placed in the trenc[23 more...]
Jubal Anderson Early, Ruth Hairston Early, Lieutenant General Jubal A. Early , C. S. A., Chapter 21: invasion of Pennsylvania. (search)
on the various battlefields. There was a very great deficiency in shoes for the infantry, a large number of the men being indifferently shod, and some barefooted. A like deficiency existed in regard to the equipment of the men in other respects, the supply of clothing, blankets, etc., being very limited. On the 11th of June, Ewell's corps resumed the march, taking the road from the lower Shenandoah Valley across the Blue Ridge at Chester Gap. Johnson's division, followed by mine, moved on the road by Sperryville, and Little Washington through the gap, and Rodes' division on a road further to the right through the same gap. Late in the day of the 12th, my division reached Front Royal, Rodes' and Johnson's having preceded it, crossing both forks of the Shenandoah near that place. Two of my brigades, Hoke's and Smith's, were crossed over both of the forks that night. Hays' and Gordon's and Jones' artillery with the division trains remained on the east side of the South Branch.
Jubal Anderson Early, Ruth Hairston Early, Lieutenant General Jubal A. Early , C. S. A., Chapter 22: capture of Winchester. (search)
ground carefully, and, after doing so, I moved Hays' brigade to the left, through a skirt of woods junction with a body of skirmishers sent out by Hays, he drove from behind a stone fence, and then sBurton's Mill, where there were some reserves. Hays, in the meantime, advanced to the front, thus ced his brigade in line across the Valley pike. Hays was posted on his left along a ridge between Ceigades were brought up and the latter placed on Hays' left, with a view to further operations againsery early on the morning of the 14th, I ordered Hays and Gordon to advance each a regiment across thWhen the men had become sufficiently refreshed, Hays' brigade, which was selected to make the assauly the enemy's guns, but in a very wild manner. Hays then advanced to the assault as directed, crossquipments complete, including those captured by Hays' brigade at the storming of the outer work, a v 144 wounded, total 174, all but one killed and six wounded being from Hays' and Gordon's brigades. [10 more...]
Jubal Anderson Early, Ruth Hairston Early, Lieutenant General Jubal A. Early , C. S. A., Chapter 23: at York and Wrightsville. (search)
ell having moved in the meantime to Shepherdstown on the Potomac, to which place Johnson's division, and Gordon's brigade, Hays' brigade and three regiments of Smith's brigade of my own division had also moved. The 54th North Carolina Regiment of Honged was retreating through the fields between Mummasburg and Gettysburg, I sent the rest of French's cavalry in pursuit. Hays' brigade, arriving soon after, was ordered to move towards Gettysburg, while the rest of this column was ordered into the camp near Mummasburg. I then rode to Gettysburg, and finding Gordon in possession of the town, Hays was halted and encamped within a mile of it, and two of his regiments were sent to help French in catching the frightened militia, but could not gth of the Conewago to burn two railroad bridges at that point and all others between there and York. Before reaching town Hays' and Smith's brigades were ordered into camp about two miles on the north of it at some mills near the railroad. Hoke's b
Jubal Anderson Early, Ruth Hairston Early, Lieutenant General Jubal A. Early , C. S. A., Chapter 24: battle of Gettysburg. (search)
road, I ordered him to remain stationary while Hays and Avery advanced on his left. The latter werng brigades, but before the battery reached me, Hays had entered the town and the enemy's retreating which they were pointing an annoying fire into Hays' left, and along the streets running towards thwooded hill before named. During the night, Hays' brigade was moved to the left into the open grof the town, and take position on it in rear of Hays and Avery, Smith's brigade being left with Genand Hill's division on his right. I ordered Hays and Avery to advance, as soon as Johnson was hes heard fairly engaged it was after sunset, and Hays and Avery then moved forward on the low ridge ithe hill, when by a dash upon the enemy's works Hays' brigade and a portion of Hoke's succeeded in erks in the woods. Before light next morning Hays and Godwin, who had taken position on Gordon's formed in line on the street first occupied by Hays, Gordon being left to hold the position in fron[9 more...]
Jubal Anderson Early, Ruth Hairston Early, Lieutenant General Jubal A. Early , C. S. A., Chapter 25: retreat to Virginia. (search)
on the morning of the 5th our army commenced retiring from before Gettysburg. The loss in my division in the battle, beginning with the first and ending with the last day, was in killed 154, wounded 799, and missing 227, total 1,180, of which Hays' and Hoke's brigades lost in the assault at the close of the day of the 2nd, in killed 39, wounded 246, and missing 149, total 434. 194 of my command were left in hospitals near Gettysburg, the rest being carried off. The loss of our army was heav's and Hill's corps going to Falling Waters and Ewell's to Williamsport to ford the river. My division brought up the rear of Ewell's corps, and the river being found too high for the passage of artillery, Jones' battalion, under the escort of Hays' brigade, was moved down the river to Falling Waters, where it crossed during the morning of the 14th. The rest of the division forded the river, in rear of the other two divisions, after sunrise on the morning of the 14th to a little above Willi
Jubal Anderson Early, Ruth Hairston Early, Lieutenant General Jubal A. Early , C. S. A., Chapter 28: devastation of the country. (search)
of losing the horses. At four o'clock, General Hays, who had been detained from his brigade by ntioned. This assault was resolutely met by Hays' men and Green's guns, who poured a destructivet their posts. When the guns were taken General Hays made an attempt to recapture them, but the e on Godwin's front simultaneously with that on Hays' right, but not in as strong force, had been rer Hale, on foot across the bridge to direct General Hays and Colonel Godwin to send and have rations returned and informed me that when he saw General Hays the enemy was advancing against him, but heeturning across the bridge he saw one or two of Hays' men coming off, who said the enemy had just bror Daniel, who informed me he had just seen General Hays, who had made his escape, and that the greamparatively slight. Nearly three hundred of Hays' officers and men, between one hundred and one h, and my own division under the command of General Hays was withdrawn from its position and concent[9 more...]
Jubal Anderson Early, Ruth Hairston Early, Lieutenant General Jubal A. Early , C. S. A., Chapter 29: skirmishing at Mine Run. (search)
rning of the 27th, as follows: my own division under Hays on the stone pike on the right, Rodes' on the road bartlett's Mill on which Johnson was. In a short time Hays came up from Bartlett's Mill and finding Rodes in po. The enemy opened with artillery on both Rodes and Hays, and some skirmishing ensued. While I was in conched me in the afternoon, and I rode to the front to Hays' position. I found the enemy occupied commanding grbrush as to make an advance very difficult. Causing Hays to connect his left with Rodes' right and so post hind for attacking me. An examination of the ground on Hays' right had caused me to suppose that an attack might at light next morning, on the west side of the run, Hays' left and Rodes' right resting on the stone pike, anance, by General Lee, arriving about dark in rear of Hays' right, and before withdrawing my own troops I commuo withdrew across the run, so as to take position on Hays' right next morning. A strong line of pickets havin
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