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The Atlanta (Georgia) Campaign: May 1 - September 8, 1864., Part I: General Report. (ed. Maj. George B. Davis, Mr. Leslie J. Perry, Mr. Joseph W. Kirkley) 111 1 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 4. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 98 2 Browse Search
Maj. Jed. Hotchkiss, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 3, Virginia (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 95 1 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 7. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 93 3 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 12. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 90 2 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 6. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 88 4 Browse Search
Jefferson Davis, The Rise and Fall of the Confederate Government 86 4 Browse Search
Comte de Paris, History of the Civil War in America. Vol. 4. (ed. Henry Coppee , LL.D.) 78 2 Browse Search
Col. O. M. Roberts, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 11.1, Texas (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 66 4 Browse Search
Fitzhugh Lee, General Lee 64 0 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in General James Longstreet, From Manassas to Appomattox. You can also browse the collection for John B. Hood or search for John B. Hood in all documents.

Your search returned 159 results in 28 document sections:

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General James Longstreet, From Manassas to Appomattox, Chapter 18: battle of Sharpsburg, or Antietam. (search)
d's brigades, and all the help he could bring. Hood's and G. T. Anderson's brigades were put in, anel, and D. H. Hill's brigades to closer lines. Hood was in season to brace them, and hold the line nt. The brigade under G. T. Anderson joined on Hood's right, and the brigades under J. G. Walker coming up took place on Hood's left, Walker leaving two regiments to fill a vacant place between Anderson's brigade and Hood's right. Walker, Hood, and D. H. Hill attacked against the Twelfth Corps; woHood, and D. H. Hill attacked against the Twelfth Corps; worn by its fight against Jackson, it was driven back as far as the post-and-rail fence in the east op At the close of the Walker-Hood-Hill affair, Hood found his line making a large angle with the lichardson followed in left echelon to Sedgwick. Hood's brigades had retired for fresh supply of ammuapel on his left. As McLaws approached, General Hood was sent to give him careful instructions o, after the rencounter of Walker's, Hill's, and Hood's divisions against Mansfield's last fight, Gen[3 more...]
General James Longstreet, From Manassas to Appomattox, Chapter 19: battle of Sharpsburg, or Antietam (continued). (search)
sted an opportunity for the Confederates, and I ordered McLaws and Walker to prepare to assault. Hood was back in position with his brigades, and Jackson was reported on his way, all in full supply os McLaws, A. P. Hill, Gibbon, and Patrick, and Colonels Barlow and Cross. Generals D. H. Hill and Hood were like game-cocks, fighting as long as they could stand, engaging again as soon as strong enou. W. Ransom; 49th N. C., Lieut.-Col. Lee M. McAfee; Branch's Field Art. (Va.), Capt. Branch. Hood's Division, Brig.-Gen. John B. Hood :--Hood's Brigade, Col. W. T. Wofford; 18th Ga., Lieut.-Col. Brig.-Gen. John B. Hood :--Hood's Brigade, Col. W. T. Wofford; 18th Ga., Lieut.-Col. S. Z. Ruff; Hampton (S. C.) Legion, Lieut.-Col. M. W. Gary; 1st Tex., Lieut.-Col. P. A. Work; 4th Tex., Lieut.-Col. B. F. Carter; 5th Tex., Capt. I. N. M. Turner. Law's Brigade, Col. E. M. Law; 4th AHood's Brigade, Col. W. T. Wofford; 18th Ga., Lieut.-Col. S. Z. Ruff; Hampton (S. C.) Legion, Lieut.-Col. M. W. Gary; 1st Tex., Lieut.-Col. P. A. Work; 4th Tex., Lieut.-Col. B. F. Carter; 5th Tex., Capt. I. N. M. Turner. Law's Brigade, Col. E. M. Law; 4th Ala., Lieut.-Col. 0. K. McLemore; 2d Miss., Col. J. M. Stone; 11th Miss., Col. P. F. Liddell; 6th N. C., Maj. Robert F. Webb. Artillery, Maj. B. W. Frobel; German Art. (S. C.), Capt. W. K. Bachman; Pa
General James Longstreet, From Manassas to Appomattox, Chapter 21: reorganization and rest for both armies. (search)
urt-House, arriving at that point at the same time as McClellan's at Warrenton,--W. H. F. Lee's cavalry the day before me. Soon after the return to Culpeper Court-House, Evans's brigade was relieved of duty with the First Corps and ordered south. Hood had a brush with a cavalry force at Manassas Gap, and part of McLaws's division a similar experience at the east end of Chester Gap. I reached Culpeper Court-House with the divisions of McLaws, R. H. Anderson, and Pickett. Hood's division wasHood's division was ordered behind Robertson River, and Ransom to Madison Court-House, General Jackson with the Second Corps remaining in the Shenandoah Valley, except one division at Chester Gap of the Blue Ridge. The Washington authorities issued orders on the 5th of November relieving General McClellan of, and assigning General Burnside to, command of the Army of the Potomac. On the 9th the army was put under General Burnside, in due form. When informed of the change, General Lee expressed regret, as h
General James Longstreet, From Manassas to Appomattox, Chapter 22: battle of Fredericksburg. (search)
of the corps came up they were posted, R. H. Anderson on Taylor's Hill; Ransom in reserve, near corps Headquarters; Pickett in the wood, in rear of McLaws's right; Hood at Hamilton's Crossing. The Federal Grand Divisions under Franklin and Hooker marched on the 18th of November, and on the 19th pitched their camps, the former McLaws had a brigade on picket service, extending its guard up and down the banks of the river, in connection with details from R. H. Anderson's division above and Hood's below, the latter meeting Stuart's cavalry vedettes lower down. At the west end of the ridge where the river cuts through is Taylor's Hill (the Confederate le Massaponax. He objected to the position, preferring the North Anna, but General Lee had already weighed the matter, and had decided in favor of Fredericksburg. Hood's division, relieved at Hamilton's Crossing, was drawn to my right and stretched across the valley of Deep Run, a little to the rear of Jackson's left and McLaws's
General James Longstreet, From Manassas to Appomattox, Chapter 23: battle of Fredericksburg (continued). (search)
to view my line and troops from right to left. Hood's division on the right was found on the alert,us that they seemed quite near at hand, and General Hood was looking for assaulting columns against nstructions similar to those just mentioned for Hood. The divisions of McLaws, Ransom, and R. H. Any engaged against them; both encountered loss. Hood got one of his brigades in in time to follow thof the break on Jackson's lines Pickett rode to Hood and urged that the opportunity anticipated was at hand, but Hood failed to see it in time for effective work. About two P. M. the battle quieted i artillery. He had, including the divisions of Hood and Pickett,--ordered to work with him,--about n as to beat them back in bad disorder. General Hood's failure to meet his orders to make counteRichmond (Fayette) Art. (Macon's battery). Hood's division, Maj.-Gen. John B. Hood :--Law's BriMaj.-Gen. John B. Hood :--Law's Brigade, Brig.-Gen. E. M. Law; 4th and 44th Ala.; 6th and 54th N. C. (Col. J. C. S. McDowell); 57th N.
General James Longstreet, From Manassas to Appomattox, Chapter 24: preparing for the spring of 1863. (search)
point the line broke to the rear, crossing the Plank road and extending back half a mile to command the road from Chancellorsville to Spottsylvania Court-House. When the lines for these works were well marked, I was ordered, with the divisions of Hood and Pickett and Dearing's and Henry's artillery battalions, to the south side near Petersburg, to be in position to meet the latter move, leaving the divisions of McLaws and R. H. Anderson to finish the work on the lines of defence. After passlines for defence, while his adversary was divided by two crossings of the river, which made Lee's sixty thousand for defence about equal to the one hundred and thirteen thousand under General Hooker. By the time that the divisions of Pickett and Hood could have joined General Lee, General Hooker would have found that he must march to attack or make a retreat without battle. It seems probable that under the original plan the battle would have given fruits worthy of a general engagement. The C
General James Longstreet, From Manassas to Appomattox, Chapter25: invasion of Pennsylvania. (search)
for the northern campaign our march was taken up on Wednesday, the 3d of June, McLaws's division of the First Corps marching on that date from Fredericksburg, and Hood's from near Orange Court-House on the 4th; Rodes's division of the Second Corps followed, and on the 5th Johnson's and Early's of the Second. Pickett of the First, with three of his brigades, followed the course of Hood's division. All were to assemble at Culpeper Court-House, near our cavalry Headquarters. The Third Corps, General A. P. Hill, was left in observation of the enemy at Fredericksburg. When General Hooker discovered the thinning of our camps in rear of Fredericksburg, he. On the 19th the divisions of the First Corps were posted along the Blue Ridge from Ashby's Gap on the right to Snicker's Gap on the left, McLaws at the former, Hood at the latter, Pickett's three brigades between the others. Under the impression that the cavalry was to operate with the First Corps, in the general plan, the co
General James Longstreet, From Manassas to Appomattox, Chapter 26: Gettysburg-First day. (search)
Taneytown. His army, including cavalry, in hand. General Lee's orders called his troops on converging lines towards Cashtown, but he found that part of his infantry must be left at Chambersburg to await the Imboden cavalry, not up, and one of Hood's brigades must be detached on his right at New Guilford to guard on that side in place of Robertson's cavalry (in Virginia). So that as he advanced towards his adversary, the eyes and ears of his army were turned afar off, looking towards the hom four o'clock. The train was fourteen miles long. It was followed by the troops of the First Corps that had been waiting all day. After night the Washington Artillery and McLaws's division camped at Marsh Run, four miles from Gettysburg. Here is Hood's account of his march: While lying in camp near Chambersburg information was received that Hill and Ewell were about to come into contact with the enemy near Gettysburg. My troops, together with McLaws's division, were at once put in motion upon
General James Longstreet, From Manassas to Appomattox, Chapter 27: Gettysburg-Second day. (search)
rates the battle was opened after mid-day General Hood appeals for permission to turn the Federal the centre by Anderson's division, McLaws's and Hood's divisions to extend the deployment to his rigput on picket down the Emmitsburg road. General Hood appealed again and again for the move to thas put in support of the battle growing against Hood's right. I rode to McLaws, found him ready under the order were McLaws's division, part of Hood's, and the artillery,about ten thousand men. Thin position by the time you get there; tell General Hood to attack. When I gave the order to GeneraGeneral Hood he was standing within a step or two of his line of battle. I asked him to please delay his d from his view and attack by his cavalry. General Hood slapped me on the knee and said, I agree wie. I lost no time in repeating the same to General Hood, and remained with him to see the attack, w was close up to him. He gave way quickly. General Hood charged, and I spurred to report to you; fo[16 more...]
General James Longstreet, From Manassas to Appomattox, Chapter28: Gettysburg-Third day. (search)
ntre by a column to be composed of McLaws's and Hood's divisions reinforced by Pickett's brigades. his defences; that the divisions of McLaws and Hood were holding a mile along the right of my line then concluded that the divisions of McLaws and Hood could remain on the defensive line; that he wouthe march moved on. The divisions of McLaws and Hood were ordered to move to closer lines for the end, orders were sent the divisions of McLaws and Hood to draw back and occupy the lines from which thal Lee ordered that the divisions of McLaws and Hood should be a part of the assaulting column. Of defend his flank and rear with the divisions of Hood and McLaws. He was therefore reinforced by Het not at all threatened, one of the divisions of Hood and McLaws, and a greater part of the other, coon; Virginia Batt., Capt. Joseph G. Blount. Hood's division, Maj.-Gen. John B. Hood, Brig.-Gen. Maj.-Gen. John B. Hood, Brig.-Gen. E. M. Law:-- Law's Brigade, Brig.-Gen. E. M. Law, Col. James L. Sheffield; 4th Ala., Lieut.-Col. L.
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