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Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 8. (ed. Frank Moore) 168 0 Browse Search
Benson J. Lossing, Pictorial Field Book of the Civil War. Volume 2. 165 1 Browse Search
William F. Fox, Lt. Col. U. S. V., Regimental Losses in the American Civil War, 1861-1865: A Treatise on the extent and nature of the mortuary losses in the Union regiments, with full and exhaustive statistics compiled from the official records on file in the state military bureaus and at Washington 149 1 Browse Search
George Meade, The Life and Letters of George Gordon Meade, Major-General United States Army (ed. George Gordon Meade) 140 0 Browse Search
Fitzhugh Lee, General Lee 137 1 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 7. (ed. Frank Moore) 113 1 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 34. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 111 1 Browse Search
Maj. Jed. Hotchkiss, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 3, Virginia (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 109 1 Browse Search
Brigadier-General Ellison Capers, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 5, South Carolina (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 105 1 Browse Search
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 4. 97 1 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 3.. You can also browse the collection for Joseph Hooker or search for Joseph Hooker in all documents.

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Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 3., The Eleventh Corps at Chancellorsville. (search)
lank road. At dawn of that eventful day General Hooker was at Chancellorsville. Slocum and Hanco four miles south from Ely's ford, where were Hooker's nearest cavalry flankers. In his report aft Lee's, was so badly handled by the enemy that Hooker at last deemed it safer to return to the north the enemy's charge. It was occasioned by General Hooker, with Colonel Comstock and a few staff-off purpose. About midday Sickles received General Hooker's orders to advance south cautiously. Sooenemy was reported to be in full retreat. General Hooker so telegraphed to Sedgwick; Captain Moore,n, came hurriedly to me with an order from General Hooker for my reserve brigade, Barlow's. Major Hoood strong fight should the enemy come. General Hooker's circular order to Slocum and Howard neitWar Records Office, but a copy of it exists in Hooker's Letters sent book and in one of the two Letthave been made in the latter part of June. In Hooker's book a notation in red ink reads, Copy furni[14 more...]
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 3., Stonewall Jackson's last battle. (search)
ral J. E. B. Stuart of the movement in force by General Hooker across the Rappahannock upon Chancellorsville; 1st, they reached Anderson's position, confronting Hooker's advance from Chancellorsville, near the Tabernaclroad. To meet the whole Army of the Potomac, under Hooker, General Lee had of all arms about 60,000 men. Genend McLaws had been sent from Fredericksburg to meet Hooker's advance from Chancellorsville; Anderson on Wedness and skirmishers were driven back upon the body of Hooker's force at Chancellorsville. Here we reached a point, a mile and a half from Hooker's lines, where a road turns down to the left toward the old Catherine Furns, never failing until heard at the headquarters of Hooker at Chancellorsville — the wild rebel yell of the lol not move as fast as others. Thus the attack upon Hooker's flank was a grand success, beyond the most sanguiConfederate shells on Sunday, May 3d, shortly after Hooker was injured while standing on the porch. The pictu
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 3., Hooker's comments on Chancellorsville. (search)
Hooker's comments on Chancellorsville. by Samuel P. Bates, his Literary Executor. Lance used by the 6th Pennsylvania(rush's Lanoers). In October, 1876, I accompanied General Hooker to the battle-fields of Fredericksburg, Chancellorsvil of his valet. After our arrival at Fredericksburg, General Hooker was the recipient of many courteous attentions from thorsville, the Wilderness, and Spotsylvania are buried, General Hooker said: I never think of this ground but with a shc, January 23d, 1863. General orders, no. 8. (1.) General Joseph Hooker, major-general of volunteers and brigadier-general,rder upon the mind of Mr. Lincoln that he decided to place Hooker, at whom the shaft was chiefly aimed, at the head of the ath it, and in his remarkable letter of January 26th to General Hooker, informing him of his appointment, he said: I have Ross and my best wishes for yourself. Your friend, Joseph Hooker. Colonel Samuel Ross, Commanding Brigade, Twelfth Corp
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 3., Sedgwick at Fredericksburg and Salem Heights. (search)
uck camp on the 27th of April, and on the 30th Hooker established his headquarters at Chancellorsvilt was the first information he had received of Hooker's movement on his left, and it is said he was bsequently been ordered to Chancellorsville by Hooker, Sedgwick was left alone below Fredericksburg e army. During the evening of the 2d of May Hooker sent word to Sedgwick to take up his line on tsition with four fresh brigades withdrawn from Hooker's front, and prepared to contest any farther a with such complete success in his attack upon Hooker that he felt he could well spare these troops lf. At first it was cautiously whispered that Hooker had failed, and soon the worst was surmised, aith their brilliant success, from the front of Hooker, with the exception of Jackson's corps, and maercised by our men in throwing up rifle-pits. Hooker sent word to Sedgwick to look well to the safedgwick were sent through General G. K. Warren, Hooker's chief of engineers, who had been sent to Sed[9 more...]
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 3., Lee's knowledge of Hooker's movements. (search)
Lee's knowledge of Hooker's movements. by R. E. Colston, Major-General, C. S. A. The assertion that Hooker's move upon Chancellorsville was a surprise to General Lee is a great mistake. Every dHooker's move upon Chancellorsville was a surprise to General Lee is a great mistake. Every day Lee had information of Hooker's movements. The following letter, sent by Lee to Jackson, and by the latter to me, has never been out of my possession since. It shows the remarkable intuition thatHooker's movements. The following letter, sent by Lee to Jackson, and by the latter to me, has never been out of my possession since. It shows the remarkable intuition that enabled General Lee on so many occasions to foresee and penetrate the intentions of his antagonist. In this case a demonstration had been made on our extreme right at Port Royal, and without waiting casualties and much exhausted by fatigue, hunger, and thirst; but it was preparing to move upon Hooker's last line of intrenchments, erected during the night on very strong positions. My division wahe situation at Fredericksburg), and I wondered why we were not to continue our advance and hurl Hooker into the river. Lee left the field at Chancellorsville immediately after giving me the above or
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 3., The opposing forces in the Chancellorsville campaign. (search)
ch army as here stated give the gist of all the data obtainable in the Official Records. K stands for killed; w for wounded; m w for mortally wounded; m for captured or missing; c for captured. The Union army. army of the Potomac.--Major-General Joseph Hooker. Staff loss: w, 1. Provost Guard, Brig.-Gen. Marsena R. Patrick: 93d N. Y., Col. John S. Crocker; E and I, 6th Pa. Cav., Capt. James Starr; 8th U. S. (6 co's), Capt. E. W. H. Read; Detachment Regular Cav., Lieut. Tattnall Paulding.a C. H., April 303123651 Rapidan Station, May 11142439 Chancellorsville, May 1--610826849421412,145 Fredericksburg, or Marye's and Salem Heights, May 3, 4493271014974,700   Grand total16069762591917,287 According to the returns for April 30, 1863 ( Official Records, Vol. XXV., Pt. II., p. 320), the effective strength of Hooker's army was, in round numbers, about 130,000, distributed as follows: Infantry, 111,000; cavalry, 11,000; and artillery, 8000, with 404 pieces of the latter arm
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 3., Hooker's appointment and removal. (search)
ry honors in recognition of his services. General Hooker thereupon became the candidate of Mr. Chas moment the needed impulse in the direction of Hooker was supplied by a person of commanding influens indelicacy of the latter's appearance before Hooker at such a moment. Mr. Lincoln went back to Wader Hooker, despite an abject appeal to him by Hooker not to leave the army. General F. A. Walkerbroke up the nearly intolerable situation, and Hooker's diligent and skillful management of his armyore the late battle. On the 5th of June General Hooker sent to the President a long dispatch, to was about to undertake an aggressive movement, Hooker says: As I am liable to be called on toecting to the requirement that he should go to Hooker's Headquarters to take over the command withouturned over to him.--C. F. B. and Burnside for Hooker. Meade proposed to Hardie that he should tele, notwithstanding, it had been determined that Hooker should be relieved, and by Meade alone, and th[43 more...]
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 3., Lee's invasion of Pennsylvania. (search)
Virginia and North Carolina, General Burnside was relieved and General Hooker put in command of the Federal Army of the Potomac. General Lee was not expecting Hooker to move so early, and gave me no warning until the Federals moved out to turn his left by Chancellorsville. He then lank to the east of us. Thus, by threatening his rear we could draw Hooker from his position on Stafford Heights opposite Fredericksburg. Our slow in order that we might be sure of having the proper effect on Hooker. Ewell was started off to the valley of Virginia to cross the molope of the Blue Ridge we heard from day to day of the movements of Hooker's army, and that he had finally abandoned his position on Stafford al army and the preparation to give us battle. The moment he heard Hooker had started across the Potomac he set out to find me. He fell in wi of the Blue Ridge. Meade was then in command of the Federal army, Hooker having been relieved. The two armies were then near each other,
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 3., The Confederate cavalry in the Gettysburg campaign. (search)
Hence Stuart came under Longstreet's orders. Hooker's headquarters were in Fairfax, with his army reported to Stuart the scattered condition of Hooker's corps, and he determined, with the approval . to-day have just been received. . . . If General Hooker's army remains inactive you can leave two ront on the evening of the 24th to pass around Hooker, leaving Robertson about Middleburg with 3000 l. When on the morning of the 25th he reached Hooker's rear, he found his whole army moving to the ons on Maryland Heights and was telegraphed to Hooker, who made a corresponding movement. On the Lee heard, through a scout at Chambersburg, of Hooker's advance. As no information of it had come from the cavalry he had left in Hooker's front in Virginia, he thought that Hooker was still there. Hooker was still there. He immediately issued an order for the concentration at Gettysburg, and sent for Robertson's commandholding Ashby's and Snicker's gaps, to prevent Hooker from interrupting the march of Lee's army; and[5 more...]
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 3., The first day at Gettysburg. (search)
so skillfully were the changes concealed that Hooker, believing that all the enemy's infantry were , and on the shortest road to Richmond. General Hooker's instructions were to keep always in viewver an opponent who had neither. As soon as Hooker learned from Pleasonton that a large infantry the passes of the Bull Run mountains and watch Hooker's army. On the 17th he encountered, near Aldid and moved toward the enemy. Early in June Hooker represented in strong terms the necessity of hon naturally resulted, and authority was given Hooker from time to time to exercise control over thewas utterly useless for any purpose; whereupon Hooker abandoned his project, and finding now that heps. Many welcomed his advent — some regretted Hooker's departure. All thought the time for the chaem, threatening Harrisburg. Unacquainted with Hooker's plans and views [see p. 243], he determined ight of the 27th. Next morning, learning that Hooker had already crossed the river, he marched nort[10 more...]
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