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Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 1. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 17 1 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 18. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 5 1 Browse Search
Edward Alfred Pollard, The lost cause; a new Southern history of the War of the Confederates ... Drawn from official sources and approved by the most distinguished Confederate leaders. 1 1 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Edward Porter Alexander, Military memoirs of a Confederate: a critical narrative. You can also browse the collection for Old Joe Hooker or search for Old Joe Hooker in all documents.

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Edward Porter Alexander, Military memoirs of a Confederate: a critical narrative, Chapter 16: Gettysburg: the first day (search)
tation. Ewell in Valley. captured property. Hooker moves. Lincoln suggests. Lee in Valley. Stuper. Hill's corps now stood alone in front of Hooker's entire army. Meanwhile, Hooker had sent Bpeper, and Hill still opposite Fredericksburg, Hooker put his army in motion from Falmouth for Manast began crossing at Williamsport on the 24th. Hooker was not far behind, for he crossed at Edward'sh, and, at the same time, covered Washington. Hooker had, meanwhile, been placed in command of the se order, but under the policy of not allowing Hooker to fight, it was but a sham, as he soon discovpense has been incurred in fortifying them. Hooker appealed in vain to Stanton and Lincoln, pointth Hooker still in command. Meade succeeded Hooker. He was an excellent fighter, but too lackines away, to deliver the order superseding him. Hooker had hoped for a different outcome. He acquiesee, therefore, on June 28, still believed that Hooker's army had not yet crossed the Potomac, and, t[29 more...]
Edward Porter Alexander, Military memoirs of a Confederate: a critical narrative, Chapter 17: Gettysburg: second day (search)
vantage given the Confederates at Chancellorsville in allowing them the occupation of the Hazel Grove plateau. But it was, nevertheless, bad tactics. It exchanged strong ground for weak, and gave the Confederates an opportunity not otherwise possible. They would be quite sure to crush the isolated 3d corps. If their attack was properly organized and conducted, it might become possible to rush and carry the Federal main line in the pursuit of the fugitives. Meade, however, having seen Hooker's movement, at once visited the ground, and, after conferring with Sickles, ordered his return to his original position. Before the movement could be begun, however, Longstreet's guns had opened, and it was unwise to attempt a withdrawal under fire. Meade saw the danger, and with military foresight prepared to meet it with every available man. There was not during the war a finer example of efficient command than that displayed by Meade on this occasion. He immediately began to bring to t
Edward Porter Alexander, Military memoirs of a Confederate: a critical narrative, Chapter 19: battle of Chickamauga (search)
Bragg could concentrate enough to attack them, Hooker appeared, coming from Bridgeport, with the 11tross Lookout Creek, and seize the road between Hooker's camp near Brown's Ferry and the camp of Gearh the advance of the 11th and 12th corps under Hooker, but had now withdrawn across Lookout Creek. e, a fine view was afforded of the valley with Hooker's camp at the north end, and Geary's three milto him. Besides the 11th and 12th corps, under Hooker, already near at hand, it was known that Grant aware of it. At sunrise, on the 25th, both Hooker and Sherman were ordered to attack. When Hookacross Chattanooga Creek, burning the bridge. Hooker followed in pursuit with three divisions, Ostel either Sherman had turned our right flank or Hooker had turned our left. Hooker was delayed and dHooker was delayed and does not seem to have been heard from. Sherman had been fought to a standstill; but thinking that hee been also marched off of Missionary Ridge by Hooker, had not Grant grown impatient. The unwise di[7 more...]
Edward Porter Alexander, Military memoirs of a Confederate: a critical narrative, Chapter 20: battle of the Wilderness (search)
ng the Rapidan at Ely's and Germanna fords, with orders from Lee to march to Todd's Tavern on the Brock road, the road by which Jackson on May 2, 1863, had turned Hooker's position. At 4 P. M., we were on the way, with orders to march all night, only stopping to feed and water. We kept it up until near sundown the next day, whenongstreet's two divisions in the morning. Meanwhile, Grant had been misled into a serious blunder by false information, curiously like what had been imposed upon Hooker in the Chancellorsville campaign. By the stories of prisoners he was led to believe, just as Hooker had been, that Pickett's division had arrived, and he orderedHooker had been, that Pickett's division had arrived, and he ordered Hancock to withdraw Barlow's division from the force about to attack Heth, and post it on his left, on the Brock road, in anticipation of Pickett's expected appearance. There happened to be near that point the grading of an unfinished railroad, designed to run from Fredericksburg to Orange C. H., and here passing through the Wil
Edward Porter Alexander, Military memoirs of a Confederate: a critical narrative, Chapter 23: the fall of 1864 (search)
themselves upon Lee's communications. On this occasion, Grant narrowly avoided one mistake of previous campaigns made, not only by himself in May, 1864, but by Hooker in May, 1863, and by Lee in June, 1863. He kept his cavalry moving and acting with his infantry instead of sending it off on a raid, having suspended on the 29thcClellan before Richmond. 2d against Pope before Washington. 3d against McClellan in Maryland. 4th against Burnside before Fredericksburg. 5th against Hooker on the Rappahannock. 6th against Meade in Pennsylvania. 7th against Grant before Richmond. This last campaign endured for eleven months, during which th, to Aug. 8, 186222,448 PopeJune 26, 1862, to Sept. 2, 186216,955 McClellanSept. 3, 1862, to Nov. 14, 186228,577 BurnsideNov. 15, 1862, to Jan. 25, 186313,214 HookerJan. 26, 1863, to Jan. 27, 186325,027 MeadeJune 28, 1863, to May 4, 186431,530 GrantMay 4, 1864, to April 9, 1865124,390 Aggregate262,141 These figures incl
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