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Lt.-Colonel Arthur J. Fremantle, Three Months in the Southern States, June, 1863. (search)
to Stonewall Jackson, he expressed, however, his astonishment that they should have praised so highly his strategic skill in outmanueuvring Pope at Manassas, and Hooker at Chancellorsville, totally ignoring that in both cases the movements were planned and ordered by General Lee, for whom (Mr. Benjamin said) Jackson had the most rode Lawley's old horse, he and the Austrian using the doctor's ambulance. In the evening General Longstreet told me that he had just received intelligence that Hooker had been disrated, and that Meade was appointed in his place. Of course he knew both of them in the old army, and he says that Meade is an honorable and respectable man, though not, perhaps, so bold as Hooker. I had a long talk with many officers about the approaching battle, which evidently cannot now be delayed long, and will take place on this road instead of in the direction of Harrisburg, as we had supposed. Ewell, who has laid York as well as Carlisle under contribution, has be
Ulysses S. Grant, Personal Memoirs of U. S. Grant, Assuming the command at Chattanooga-opening a line of supplies-battle of Wauhatchie-on the picket line (search)
[0. 0.] Howard and [Henry W.] Slocum, [Joseph] Hooker in command of the whole, from the Army of the ttanooga, the following details were made: General Hooker, who was now at Bridgeport, was ordered tote Whitesides, then cross and hold the road in Hooker's rear after he had passed. Four thousand men of the enemy, made the connection complete. Hooker found but slight obstacles in his way, and on which the troops had been so long deprived of. Hooker had brought with him from the east a full suppo Bridgeport and, with the aid of steamers and Hooker's teams, in a week the troops were receiving f strength on Lookout Mountain was not equal to Hooker's command in the valley below. From Missionarongstreet's corps. When the battle commenced, Hooker ordered Howard up from Brown's Ferry. He had of their muskets. In the darkness and uproar, Hooker's teamsters became frightened and deserted thered. In the night engagement of the 28th-29th Hooker lost 416 killed and wounded. I never knew the [1 more...]
Ulysses S. Grant, Personal Memoirs of U. S. Grant, Condition of the Army-rebuilding the Railroad- General Burnside's situation-orders for battle-plans for the attack-hooker's position- Sherman's movements (search)
e on to the railroad between Cleveland and Dalton. Hooker will at the same time attack, and, if he can, carryout Mountain was of no special advantage to us now. Hooker was instructed to send Howard's corps to the north ite Chattanooga; with the remainder of the command, Hooker was, at a time to be afterwards appointed, to ascens connection with his base at Chickamauga Station. Hooker was to perform like service on our right. His prob by the enemy if we should secure Missionary Ridge, Hooker's orders were changed. His revised orders brought was then to move out to the right to Rossville. Hooker's position in Lookout Valley was absolutely essenti even after the battle for this purpose was begun. Hooker's orders, therefore, were designed to get his forceh with the troops on Missionary Ridge. By marching Hooker to the north side of the river, thence up the streais line across the valley and on Lookout Mountain. Hooker's order was changed accordingly. As explained else
Ulysses S. Grant, Personal Memoirs of U. S. Grant, Preparations for battle-thomas Carries the first line of the enemy-sherman Carries Missionary Ridge--battle of Lookout Mountain--General Hooker's fight (search)
sionary Ridge--battle of Lookout Mountain--General Hooker's fight On the 20th, when so much was othe 24th. Because of the break in the bridge, Hooker's orders were again changed, but this time onlions were going on to the east of Chattanooga, Hooker was engaged on the west. He had three divisio. The side of Lookout Mountain confronting Hooker's command was rugged, heavily timbered, and fue summit. Early on the morning of the 24th Hooker moved Geary's division, supported by a brigadethe upper palisade. The day was hazy, so that Hooker's operations were not visible to us except at below, settled down and made it so dark where Hooker was as to stop operations for the time. At four o'clock Hooker reported his position as impregnable. By a little after five direct communicationnder, General [William P.] Carlin, reported to Hooker and was assigned to his left. I now telegraphw hold the eastern slope and a point high up.3 Hooker reports two thousand prisoners taken, besides [2 more...]
Ulysses S. Grant, Personal Memoirs of U. S. Grant, Battle of Chattanooga-a gallant charge-complete Rout of the enemy-pursuit of the Confederates--General Bragg--remarks on Chattanooga (search)
Sherman was directed to attack at daylight. Hooker was ordered to move at the same hour, and endeissionary Ridge. Thomas was not to move until Hooker had reached Missionary Ridge. As I was with hall he could to obstruct the roads behind him. Hooker was off bright and early, with no obstructions as the presence of the enemy may require. If Hooker's position on the mountain [cannot be maintainget on to the railroad towards Graysville. Hooker, as stated, was detained at Chattanooga Creek do so escaped. Many, however, were captured. Hooker's position during the night of the 25th was neman was to get on Missionary Ridge, as he did; Hooker to cross the north end of Lookout Mountain, ase south end of the ridge near Rossville. When Hooker had secured that position the Army of the Cumbved, however, the order was so changed as that Hooker was directed to come to Chattanooga by the nored in crossing troops upon it. For this reason Hooker's orders were changed by telegraph back to wha[1 more...]
Ulysses S. Grant, Personal Memoirs of U. S. Grant, The relief of Knoxville-headquarters moved to Nashville-visiting Knoxville-cipher dispatches --Withholding orders (search)
isorganized mob, with the exception of Cleburne's division, which was acting as rear-guard to cover the retreat. When Hooker moved from Rossville toward Ringgold Palmer's division took the road to Graysville, and Sherman moved by the way of Chickauga Creek and Taylor's Ridge, and about twenty miles south-east from Chattanooga. I arrived just as the artillery that Hooker had left behind at Chattanooga Creek got up. His men were attacking Cleburne's division, which had taken a strong positioed a great many times in the course of the first mile. This attack was unfortunate, and cost us some men unnecessarily. Hooker captured, however, 3 pieces of artillery and 230 prisoners, and 130 rebel dead were left upon the field. I directed GGeneral Hooker to collect the flour and wheat in the neighboring mills for the use of the troops, and then to destroy the mills and all other property that could be of use to the enemy, but not to make any wanton destruction. At this point Sherman
Ulysses S. Grant, Personal Memoirs of U. S. Grant, Sherman's campaign in Georgia-siege of Atlanta --death of General McPherson-attempt to capture Andersonville-capture of Atlanta (search)
ave abandoned the contest and agreed to a separation. Atlanta was very strongly intrenched all the way around in a circle about a mile and a half outside of the city. In addition to this, there were advanced intrenchments which had to be taken before a close siege could be commenced. Sure enough, as indicated by the change of commanders, the enemy was about to assume the offensive. On the 20th he came out and attacked the Army of the Cumberland most furiously [at Peach Tree Creek]. Hooker's corps, and Newton's and Johnson's divisions were the principal ones engaged in this contest, which lasted more than an hour; but the Confederates were then forced to fall back inside their main lines. The losses were quite heavy on both sides. On this day General [Walter Q.] Gresham, since our Postmaster-General, was very badly wounded. During the night Hood abandoned his outer lines, and our troops were advanced. The investment had not been relinquished for a moment during the day.
Ulysses S. Grant, Personal Memoirs of U. S. Grant, The end of the war-the March to Washington- one of Lincoln's anecdotes-grand review at Washington-characteristics of Lincoln and Stanton-estimate of the different corps commanders (search)
es, and who attracted much public attention, but of whose ability as soldiers I have not yet given any estimate, are Meade, Hancock, Sedgwick, Burnside, Terry and Hooker. There were others of great merit, such as Griffin, Humphreys, Wright and Mackenzie. Of those first named, Burnside at one time had command of the Army of the Potomac, and later of the Army of the Ohio. Hooker also commanded the Army of the Potomac for a short time. General Meade was an officer of great merit, with drawbacks to his usefulness that were beyond his control. He had been an officer of the engineer corps before the war, and consequently had never served with troops untiers, and extenuated those of officers under him beyond what they were entitled to. It was hardly his fault that he was ever assigned to a separate command. Of Hooker I saw but little during the war. I had known him very well before, however. Where I did see him, at Chattanooga, his achievement in bringing his command around t
J. B. Jones, A Rebel War Clerk's Diary, chapter 22 (search)
f the enemy, leaving fifty negroes on it — which he could have sold for $50,000. They promised not to leave him, and they kept their word. Judge Donnell, in North Carolina, has left his plantation with several hundred thousand dollars worth on it-rather risking their loss than to sell them. December 4 All is quiet (before the storm) on the Rappahannock, Gen. Jackson's corps being some twenty miles lower down the river than Longstreet's. It is said Burnside has been removed already and Hooker given the command. Gen. S. Cooper takes sides with Col. Myers against Gen. Wise. Gen. W.'s letter of complaint of the words, Let them suffer, was referred to Gen. C., who insisted upon sending the letter to the Quartermaster-General before either the Secretary or the President saw it,--and it was done. Why do the Northern men here hate Wise? Gen. Lee dispatches to-day that there is a very large amount of corn in the Rappahannock Valley, which can be procured, if wagons be sent from
J. B. Jones, A Rebel War Clerk's Diary, XXII. January, 1863 (search)
e of the earth, and explodes when a horse or a man treads upon it. He says he would not use such a weapon in ordinary warfare; but has no scruples in resorting to any means of defense against an army of Abolitionists, invading our country for the purpose, avowed, of extermination. He tried a few shell on the Peninsula last spring, and the explosion of only four sufficed to arrest the army of invaders, and compelled them to change their line of march. January 26 The Northern papers say Hooker's grand division crossed the Rappahannock, ten miles above Falmouth, several days ago. Burnside has issued an address to his army, promising them another battle immediately. Gen. Lee advises the government to buy all the grain in the counties through which the canal runs. He says many farmers are hoarding their provisions, for extortionate prices. I have no house yet. Dr. Wortham had one; and although I applied first, he let Mr. Reagan, the Postmaster-General, have it. He is a m
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